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Full text of "Bay Area Reporter, Volume 14, Number 43, 25 October 1984"

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VOL. XIV NO. 43 OCTOBER 25, 1984 1 528 1 5TH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103 


TELEPHONE. 415/861-5019 



Firemen Trash 
Gay Restaurant 

Police Refuse to Investigate, 
Make No Arrests in Attack 

by Allen White 

Five members of the San Francisco Fire Department have 
been identified as suspects in the violent brawl at the Gay 
Casa de Cristal restaurant on Saturday, Oct. 20. The brawl 
began when the firemen made anti-Gay slurs at waiters and 
a patron, continued when they assaulted one patron and the 
restaurant owner, and ended with bottles flying and tables 
overturned. 

Police called to the scene refused to enter the restaurant. 
Although police went to the firehouse where the firemen 
work, they did not make any arrests. As this edition of the 
Bay Area Reporter went to press, no charges had been filed 
in the brawl. 


Too-Too Much. Bulbous ballerinas make their appearance on Castro Street — part of a troupe of 60 on Saturday 
night. (Photo: Rink) 


A NEWS ANALYSIS 


Commissioner Jo Daly: 
Whose Side Is She On? 

Smiling Photos With Anti-Gay Cop 
And Candidate Kevin Starr 

by Allen White 

Many in San Francisco’s Lesbian and Gay community have 
seriously begun to question whether Jo Daly, Lesbian police 
commissioner, is selling out her roots — San Francisco’s Gay 
community. Holding one of the highest appointive offices 
in the city, she has recently been the subject of two highly 
controversial articles in the San Francisco Examiner. 


On Sunday, Aug. 19, as the 
active Gay political community 
and many police officers were 
reacting to an inflammatory 
anti-Gay column by a splinter 
police group, “Cops For 
Christ,” Daly took to the pages 
of the Examiner in an article 
authored by Larry Maatz. In 
the story, she defended members 
of ‘‘Cops For Christ” and never 
once was there any defense of 
the Gay community mentioned. 


As she praised “Cops For 
Christ,” she ignored the fact 
that Rev. Jim Sandmire, a Gay 



Jo Daly (Photo: Rink) 


minister and police chaplain, 
was humiliated and embarrass¬ 
ed in the “Cops For Christ” col¬ 
umn. For weeks after the article 
appeared, Jo Daly would not 
return the phone calls of Sand¬ 
mire, the pastor of the Golden 
Gate Metropolitan Community 
Church. 

Sandmire stated to several 
people that he was personally 
hurt, not by the “Cops For 
Christ,” but by the total lack of 
compassion or concern by Jo 
Daly. 

Following the article, she said 
she stood by all the statements 
in the story. 

One comment in the story 
stated that Supervisor Richard 
Hongisto was to introduce legis¬ 
lation primarily because mem¬ 
bers of the Gay community saw 
the “Cops For Christ” column 
and were “incensed and insulted 
by it.” 

Examiner columnist Larry 
Maatz quotes Daly as respond¬ 
ing, “But Daly disagreed, ‘I’m 
a pretty visible member of the 
Lesbian and Gay community,’ 
she said, ‘and my phone sure 
hasn’t been ringing off the hook 
about it.’” 

Her phone might have stayed 
(Continued on page 4) 


Man Mem to 
2 Teens’ Murders 

San Francisco police re¬ 
ported Wednesday afternoon 
that a 42-year-old ex-convict 
has confessed to the murder 
of 15-year-old Theodore 
Gomez last month. William 
Melvin White also led homi¬ 
cide detectives to a location 
near Land’s End where the 
decapitated, dismembered 
body of another young man 
was discovered Tuesday after¬ 
noon. 

Authorities in Salem, Ore¬ 
gon, arrested White on sex 
charges last weekend. After 
telling police there that he 
had murdered a man in San 
Francisco, he was taken to the 
city where he admitted both 
murders. 

The body of young Gomez 
was discovered in Golden 
Gate Park on Sept.22. He had 
died of multiple stab wounds. 

Homicide investigators 
have yet to identify the second 
victim, described as a teenage 
street person. ■ 


The primary victim of the at¬ 
tack was Bill Moore, a restau¬ 
rant customer who works as a 
bartender at the newly opened 
Hard Rock Cafe. The straight 
man was at the restaurant hav¬ 
ing dinner with two women 
friends when the fight broke out. 

Tony Vaughn, a customer at 
the Polk Street area restaurant, 
said the fight resembled a bar 
brawl “just like in the movies.” 

Robert McNamara described 
the firefighters as loud and abu¬ 
sive. Randy Hanson, the waiter 
for the group, endured an on¬ 
slaught of homophobic slurs 
from the San Francisco firemen. 
“Wouldn’t you just love to have 
me pull out my cock? ” one fire¬ 
man reportedly said. Another 
firefighter reportedly said, “Bet 
you would love to have a penis 
in your mouth.” 

Witnesses said the firemen 
were making “fag” and “pansy” 
remarks. One of those who was 
a target was Bill Moore. He and 
his two friends chose to have 
dinner at the restaurant. Last 
Saturday night at 10 p.m. the 
restaurant was filled to capacity. 
There was a waiting list as peo¬ 
ple had drinks at the bar of the 
P.S. Restaurant next door. 

Sitting at an adjoining table, 
Moore and the women he was 
with were forced to endure the 
continual stream of anti-Gay re¬ 


marks. The comments became 
so loud and so hostile that owner 
George Sanders asked the fire¬ 
men to leave. 

As they started to depart, one 
of the men turned to Moore and 
called him “a fucking pansy.” 
Moore stood and made a remark 
about one of the firemen’s 
mother. At that, the members of 
the San Francisco Fire Depart¬ 
ment attacked Moore. The men, 
as they pummeled Moore, sent 
glasses, dishes, and chairs 
flying. 

Several waiters tried to pull 
Moore away from the firemen. 
They were able to move him to 
the other side of the restaurant. 
As he was being held, dazed and 
bleeding, the firemen went after 
Moore, throwing glasses and 
dishes in their path to the floor. 
They attacked Moore again, 
beating him to the floor. 

At 10:08 the first phone call 
was received by the police say¬ 
ing there was a fight. One min¬ 
ute later Harry, a waiter, called, 
frantically saying “patrons in 
the restaurant are throwing bot¬ 
tles and glasses” and that “this 
was getting out of hand.” Two 
minutes later, Sanders called the 
police saying he believed the five 
were firemen. 

By this time the firemen had 
done their damage and were 
(Continued on page 2) 


Immigration Rules Leave 
Couple Without a Coiiiilrv 

Years-Long Struggle Leads to Order 
For Deportation of Australian Gay 

by Charlie Linebarger 

“. . . We do not find that the respondent’s (Anthony Sullivan’s) separation from his ‘life 
partner’ (Richard Adams) will cause him hardship, emotional or otherwise ...” So went the 
decision of the federal Board of Immigration Appeals in April, effectively classing Gay rela¬ 
tionships in the same unrecognized limbo accorded to marriages between slaves before the Eman¬ 
cipation Proclamation. . , 

(Continued on page 6) 

























DEAN 

GOODMAN 

Community College 
Board 

• Progressive 
• Aggressive 
• A Lifetime Defender of 
Gay Rights 

ENDORSED BY 

Stonewall Gay Democratic Club 
National Organization of Women, PAC 
Mexican-American Political Association 
Alice B. Toklas Lesbian and Gay 
Democratic Club 



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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 2 


Fireman toll Gay Restaurant 


(Continued from page 1) 

leaving the restaurant. They 
walked down Post Street a half¬ 
block to the loeal fire station. 

A minute later, the police ar¬ 
rived on the scene. The manage¬ 
ment aqd waiters of the restau¬ 
rant were stunned when the 
police tried to minimize the seri¬ 
ousness of the incident. The 
police knew the attackers were 
members of the San Francisco 
Fire Department and several 
present immediately surmised 
that the “code of silence” was 
beginning to take effect. 

Bill Moore was accused of 
having red eyes, which the police 
said was an indication of drink¬ 
ing. Waiters at the restaurant 
were astonished that the police 
might not conclude that a per¬ 
son who has just been brutally 
beaten might have puffy eyes. 
The police were hesitant to at¬ 
tempt to locate the firemen, get 
their names or make an arrest. 

The Bay Area Reporter talk¬ 
ed to five witnesses, who said 
that though the restaurant was 
a shambles, the police never 
entered the restaurant to assess 
the damage. Bill Moore insisted 
that the police take him to the 
fire station to attempt to locate 
his attackers. They agreed, but 
reluctantly, he said. 

As they entered the fire sta¬ 
tion, one of the attackers was 
present. He was not arrested. 
Another firemen, possibly an of¬ 
ficer in charge, told Moore, “If 
you want, come back tomorrow 
night when I’m off duty and I’ll 
whip your ass too.” 

Once in the fire station, 
Moore said he was forced to 
withstand another set of verbal 
attacks accusing him of being 
Gay. In fact, Bill Moore is 
straight. 

Moore said he looked at the 
fireman and said, “Suppose I 
am Gay, what difference does it 
make . . . after all, you guys 
sleep upstairs with each other. ” 
At that point Bill Moore said the 
fireman became uncontrollable 
with rage. 

“He was an animal, it seemed 
like he was going to kill me,” 
said Moore. The police restrain¬ 
ed the fireman from attacking 
Moore again. 

The night of the attack, the 
police did not identify the sus¬ 
pects in the beating or assess the 
damage done to the restaurant. 
On Tuesday, Assistant Fire 
Chief Oliver Storti told the Bay 
Area Reporter that the identity 
of the firefighters had been 
learned. He said the men would 
be making statements to the po¬ 
lice department. Storti said that 
Fire Chief Emmet Condon had 
ordered a full investigation of 
the incident. 

Storti would not divulge the 
names of the firemen to the 
press. It was his position that the 
incident was under investigation 
and therefore it was not neces¬ 
sary to reveal their names. ■ 

A. White 



The Brawl Site. The Casa de Cristal restaurant, where the firemen’s brawl 
was held. (Photo: Rink) 


'He was like an animal. It seemed like he 
was going to kill me/ 

— Bill Moore 



Busts in Ringold Alley While 
Mounties Patrol Buena Vista Pk. 

Arrests in Ringold Alley and patrols of police mounted on 
horseback in Buena Vista Park have been reported in the past 
week. 


Seven men are known to have 
been ticketed and one arrested 
in the early hours Saturday in 
Ringold Alley, a popular cruis¬ 
ing area in the South of Market 
neighborhood. Three of the cita¬ 
tions were sex-related: two for 
oral sex, and one for a man 


alleged to be exposing himself in 
his car. The other citations were 
for public urination and posses¬ 
sion of small amounts of mari¬ 
juana. 

All the known citations occur¬ 
red between 2:13 and 2:40 a.m. 
Saturday, and were issued by 


Officers Cooper and Hollins of 
the Southern Station, head¬ 
quartered in the Hall of Justice 
at Fourth and Bryant Streets. 

One man who said he was an 
eyewitness to police activity late 
Friday night/early Saturday 
morning told the Bay Area 
Reporter that two police paddy 
wagons were on the scene. This 
report could not be confirmed. 

Meanwhile, in Buena Vista 
Park — another Gay cruising 
area — police mounted on 
horseback have been regularly 
patrolling. It is unknown if any 
arrests have taken place in the 
park. ■ 









































EXPRESS ?i«8 
I REVULSION 
’ NOT, 8TB 


STONEWALL GAY DEMOCRATIC CLUB 


The Kopp Quote is revived, enlarged, and displayed for Muni Metro 
underground riders. (Photo; Rink) 


Undergrouil Effort to Stop Kopp 
tails Him With His Own Words 


SIO 




“God damn it, I told you to have those people talk to Jack 
Davis about that, don't you understand?" So screamed Super¬ 
visor Quentin Kopp at his secretary when a request was made 
by a reporter for a comment on billboards that now hang in 
several Muni Metro stations quoting the supervisor. 


The boards were posted last 
week and were paid for by the 
Stonewall Gay Democratic 
Club. Across the top of the signs 
are the word “revulsion” in bold 
letters. What follows is a quote 
made by Supervisor Quentin 
Kopp regarding San Francisco’s 
Gay community which ap¬ 
peared in The New York Times. 

J ack Davis is Quentin Kopp’s 
campaign manager. He said the 
boards were “obviously politi¬ 
cally motivated by extremists 
who have not been fair with his 
record. The truth be known, 
Supervisor Kopp voted for 
AIDS funding, supported the 
original Human Rights ordi¬ 
nance introduced by Harvey 
Milk, publicly opposed the 


Briggs Initiative, and lobbied 
Governor Deukmejian for 
AB-1. 

“It’s just basically coming 
from people who have an ideo¬ 
logical hard-on for Kopp be¬ 
cause he walks to a different 
drummer with their extremist 
beliefs,” Davis said. “In terms 
of the net effect of the race and 
the reelection effort, I think it 
will help.” 

Paul Boneberg, President of 
the Stonewall Gay Democratic 
Club, said Kopp and Davis 
should remember “that it was 
Harry Truman who said, ‘We 
never gave them hell, we just 
told the truth and they thought 
it was hell.’” 


Preiiminaiy Appeal on Baths 
Is Rejected liv State Court 

A preliminary appeal to reopen 9 closed Gay bathhouses 
was rejected this week. A three-judge panel of the State Court 
of AppVals denied a written petition to reopen the clubs un¬ 
til a hearing on a permanent closure order is held Nov. 8. 


Boneberg said, “I think 
anyone who reads the statement 
on the billboard will be clear on 
Supervisor Kopp’s position on 
Lesbian and Gay people. That 
is why the billboard simply 
reproduces his own words. If he 
wants to run on a position that 
Lesbian and Gay people are not 
in his consitutency, then I think 
Gay voters should know that.” 

The Stonewall president said, 
“Our purpose is to inform the 
voters about what Quentin 
Kopp said. There is absolutely 
no other strategy.” The state¬ 
ment by Kopp comes from a 
New York Times article which 
appeared at the time of the 
Democratic National Conven¬ 
tion. 

The billboards were paid for 
through the sale of “Stop Kopp” 
buttons which were sold last 
August at the Castro Street Fair. 
The signs are posted in the 
Castro, Civic Center, Church, 
and Montgomery Street Muni 
Metro stations. ■ 



Jack Davis (Photo: Rink) 


The panel voted 2-1, with 
Justice J. Anthony Cline dis¬ 
senting, not to overturn the clo¬ 
sure order. San Francisco Supe¬ 
rior Court Judge William Mul¬ 
lins ordered the sex clubs and 
bathhouses closed Oct. 12. The 
judge’s temporary restraining 
order followed an order Oct. 9 
by Dr. Mervyn Silverman, the 
Director of Public Health, to 
close the bathhouses because of 
the AIDS epidemic. 

Attorneys for the bathhouses, 
and Gay civil rights attorneys in¬ 
volved on behalf of the Gay 
community, said they were not 
discouraged by the rejection of 
the preliminary appeal. Thomas 
Steel, one of the attorneys, said 
it appeared the appeal court 
wanted to wait until after the 
Nov. 8 Superior Court hearing 
to fully delve into the matter. 
The appeal court rejected the 
appeal “without prejudice, 
meaning the lawyers may file the 
same appeal in the same court 
again. ® 


Oar Wash Benefit 
For AIDS Foundation 

The Touchstone Society will 
sponsor a car wash to benefit the 
San Francisco AIDS Founda¬ 
tion on Saturday, Oct. 27, at the 
Union 76 station at Market and 
Duboce Streets from 9 a.m. to 
6 p.m. The price will be: cars 
$3, trucks and vans $5. • 


Baths Protest 
Rally Called 
For Oct. 29 

The Committee to Preserve 
Our Sexual and Civil Liberties 
announces a rally to protest the 
closing of San Francisco bath¬ 
houses and its civil liberties im¬ 
plications. The rally will occur 
Monday, Oct. 29, at 7:30 p.m. 
at Castro and Market Streets 
(Harvey Milk Plaza). 

The committee was organized 
on Oct. 19 by 120 activists at a 
meeting at the Valencia Rose. 
Randy Stallings, long-time San 
Francisco Gay activist, was 
elected coordinator. 

The committee formed to pro¬ 
test the bathhouse closure and to 
guard against further civil liber¬ 
ties encroachment. There will be 
another meeting on Friday, Oct. 
26, 7:30 p.m., at the Valencia 
Rose, 766- Valencia St. near 
18th. All are invited to attend. 

Contributions may be sent to 
the Committee to Preserve Our 
Sexual and Civil Liberties in 
care of: Steve Cain, 40 Alvarado 
St. #5, San Francisco, CA 
94110. 

For further information con¬ 
tact Vince Quackenbush at 863- 
2632, or Randy Stallings at 8()4- 
1774. ■ 


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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 3 


















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Oct. 28: Religion, Part III of 4; 
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Rev. Thorp. 

Nov. 4: Religion, Part IV of 4; 

The Need for Meditation 
_ Rev. Thorp. 


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HARVEY MILK 

LESBIAN & GAY DEMOCRATIC CLUB 


ELECTION ENDORSEMENTS 

■k 

IIIVw tfW® Ml IWC jlWHv ITOTOfVVWGI Wa 

President & 
Vice President 

Walter Mondale 

Geraldine Ferraro 

A future Supreme Court with up to 5 Reagan appointees could kill the progress 
of gay rights for decades. The Democratic platform specifically pledges fed¬ 
eral legislation to end anti-gay discrimination. 

Supervisor 

Harry Britt 

John Molinari 

Willie Kennedy 

Carol Ruth Silver 

Pat Norman 

Congress 

Sala Burton 

Barbara Boxer 

State Senate 

Ua Belli 

State Assembly Art Agnos 

Willie Brown 

College Board 

Tim Wolfred 

Julie Tang 

Ernest Ayala 

Amos Brown 

School Board 

Libby Denebeim 

Ben Tom 

Dick Cerbatos 

Joanne Miller 

BART Board 

Rodney Johnson 

Local 

Propositions 

YES on A, B, C, E, F, G, 1 

YES on J 

Stop city investment in racist South Africa 

State 

Propositions 

YES on 25,26,27,28, 29,30, 31,32, 33, 34 

YES on 37 Lottery 

NO on 36 Jarvis IV 

NO on 38 English-only voting materials 


1 NO :Mi 39 Hco.ib 'Crli • f(Mppor!*Or»PH> r ' 


NO on 40 Campaign financing 

NO on 41 Slashes social services 


YOUR VOTE IS YOUR POWER. 
Vole Tuesday, N o v e mb er 6. 


Gay Leaders Criticize Daly 


(Continued from page 1) 
in place, but the Alice B. Toklas 
Lesbian/Gay Democratic Club, 
a club she once served as presi¬ 
dent, had a different approach. 
The club members were furious. 

They passed two resolutions 
damning the Police Officers 
Association for being associated 
with a column of such cheap 
shots at the Gay community. 
The Police Officers Association 
itself, unlike Daly, voted unani¬ 
mously to disassociate itself 
from the “Cops For Christ.” 

To the contrary, Daly has 
taken a position which backs the 
“Cops For Christ” and she op¬ 
posed the Hongisto legislation, 
which passed in the San Fran¬ 
cisco Board of Supervisors and 
was vetoed by the mayor. 

Daly was offered the oppor¬ 
tunity to comment for this story 
but declined. On Monday, Oct. 
22, a message was hand- 
delivered to her Diamond 
Heights home asking for com¬ 
ment. Daly contacted the Bay- 
Area Reporter late Tuesday, 
and said she would prefer to ad¬ 
dress the issues raised in this 
article after it appeared. 

As the “Cops For Christ” 
furor was beginning to die 
down, Jo Daly popped up again 
on Oct. 3 in the San Francisco 
Examiner. According to report¬ 
er Maatz, she made the decision 
she wanted to have a meeting 
with police officer Greg Cor- 
rales, a former narcotics officer 
and what the Examiner de¬ 
scribed as a “hate object for 
many in the Gay community.” 

As a police commissioner, 
Daly is Corrales’ boss, yet she 
chose to meet the police officer 
with a reporter present from the 
San Francisco Examiner. Maatz 
quotes the police commissioner 
as saying, “Could you introduce 
us? . . . Could you arrange for 
us to meet and then sit in with 
us as kind of a neutral party? ” 

The story, which rims almost 
two pages in length, mentions 
Gays only twice: Once in Daly’s 
hearsay description of Corrales, 
and as she describes how she 
acts as a disciplinarian at police 
hearings. A police commissioner 
since 1980, Jo Daly says of Cor¬ 
rales, “A lot of people in the Gay 
community are simply terrified 
of him, of him and his reputa¬ 
tion. They tell me he does terri¬ 
ble things, that he beats people, 
that he plants dope on them, and 
then arrests them, that he hates 
homosexuals, that he is brutal, 
sadistic.” 

She goes on to say, “And then 
other people, people I respect, 
tell me that none of these stories 
are true, that he’s really a fine 
police officer. I want to meet 
him.” With such a laundry list 
of accusations, it seems note¬ 
worthy that a Lesbian on the 
police commission to represent 
the Gay community doesn’t 
know the facts surrounding Cor¬ 
rales’ record. 

Corrales, according to colum¬ 
nist Maatz, bears some resent¬ 
ment toward Daly for remarks 
attribtued to her for the role he 
played in the Polk Street sweeps 
of 1981. 

At the time, over 400 people 
were arrested, but only three 
people were ever charged. The 
remainder were hauled around 
in paddy wagons, harassed, 
beaten, and abused by members 
of the police vice squad. The 
remark was that Jo Daly had 
called Corrales an “animal.” 

Examiner writer Maatz says 
that Jo Daly claimed she had 
been misquoted. The original 
story appeared in the Bay Area 
Reporter. In her on-the-record 



Jo Daly (Photo: Rink) 


remarks Daly did not call Cor¬ 
rales “an animal.” What Daly 
did say — and was quoted as 
saying — was that “some of the 
officers were animals.” Many of 
her comments made at the time 
of the Polk Street sweeps against 
officers were not printed in the 
Bay Area Reporter because they 


were either off the record or 
bordered too close to legal action 
against the paper to be printed. 

At the Monday, October 8, 
meeting of the Alice B. Toklas 
political club, Community 
United Against Violence Direc¬ 
tor Diane Christensen openly 
criticized Daly. Others did so 
privately. The criticism comes at 
a time when the Office of Citizen 
Complaints — a direct arm of 
the police commission — is in 
shambles. The citizens’ com¬ 
plaint system was an important 
issue to Gays, whose support 
was critical in winning its adop¬ 
tion on the baHot two years ago. 

Meanwhile, Daly has not 
been active on that issue — 
choosing instead to devote her 
energy to campaigning for su¬ 
pervisorial candidate Kevin 
Starr. Starr is a former Exam¬ 
iner columnist whose anti-Gay 
column “Sodom by the Sea” in 
April 1978 shocked the Gay 
community, 

Starr wrote, “Violence is al¬ 
ways lurking in the underlife of 
Sodom and Gomorrah, for when 
the consumption of bodies ex¬ 
hausts itself and still there is no 
satisfaction, then comes the kill¬ 
ing rage.” 

It is against that record that 
Daly is seen in Kevin Starr com¬ 
mercials, posing for photos with 
the candidate, and lobbying for 
Gays to support him. There is 
another relationship as well: 
Starr heads a taxicab associ¬ 
ation, and Daly, as a member of 
the police commission, votes on 
issuance of cab permits. ■ 


A. White 

What They Say 
About Jo Daly 

Gordon Armstrong, head trial attorney, Public Defender’s 
Office: “I didn’t realize she was so naive and I am convinced that 
the Police Commission is a joke.” 

Carmen Vasquez, former head of the Women’s Building and 
now a staff member of Community United Against Violence: 
“She is putting her interests above those of the community and 
that is wrong. There are times when you have to curb your tongue 
and not put yourself in a position of saying, ‘Look, the police are 
above criticism, the police are public servants, therefore we have 
to take whatever they dish out.’ No! The police have a respon¬ 
sibility to be responsive to our community and our needs, so when 
we single out an officer and say he or she is not doing their job 
it is because we have good reason. And therefore as a Lesbian and 
a member of the Police Commission Jo Daly needs to be at the 
front of the leadership that is saying, ‘Let’s look into this.’ The 
question is whether she is seriously doing this.” 

Jim Sandmire, Gay Police Chaplain and Pastor of Golden 
Gate Metropolitan Community Church: “I’m hopeful she will 
not remain isolated as she has recently from broad sections of our 
community. She has been most effective when she has been regu¬ 
larly involved. 1 would hope that she would assist me in establish¬ 
ing a dialogue as a police chaplain. Also, we must acknowledge 
the valuable work she has done in the past.” 

Bob Cramer, a former President of the Alice B. Toklas 
Democratic Club and Chair of the Cable Car Awards: “A chain 
is only as strong as its weakest link and the Mayor’s weakest link 
has always been the Police Department. Jo Daly is a police com¬ 
missioner and she has to take some of that blame.” 

Ken Cady, Assistant District Attorney: “Because of the Ex¬ 
aminer story, if Lt. Corrales ever should come before the Police 
Commission on a discipline charge, she would have to disqualify 
herself. This would deprive the Gay community of any represen¬ 
tation in the process. It would have been wise if she had been 
impartial.” 

John Wahl, Gay rights attorney and candidate for Supervisor: 
“Jo Daly represents the Mayor’s interest very, very well, but for 
quite some time the Mayor’s interests have not been the interests 
of the Gay and Lesbian community.” 

Paul Boneberg, President of the Stonewall Gay Democratic 
Club: “She is the result of the promise of the Mayor in the 1979 
Mayor’s race. She promised the Gay community a Gay police com¬ 
missioner and that person was Jo Daly. The problem lies not with 
Jo Daly but with the moderate attitude that prevails. There is now 
a willingness to tolerate much more. The one militant person on 
the Police Commission was Jane Murphy and she was removed. 
Jo Daly does the best job under the political climate in which she 
has to operate. Also, we have a tendency to blame our own peo¬ 
ple first. I would like to see a more militant climate but I don’t 
think that is possible." ® 

Allen White 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 4 













































The lesbian anil gay community 
is united behind Supervisor Harry Britt. 



Stephen Baker 

Physician 




Carole Migden 

President, Harvey Milk 
Lesbian & Cay 
Democratic Club 



Wayne Friday 

Political Editor. 
Bay Area Reporter 


To show our pride, build our political power, and respond to threats 
to our rights, lesbians and gay men have always joined together. 

Although we may not always agree about the complex issues facing 
us, gay people have united when it was vital that we protect our strong 
position in the city, and see that our needs were met. 

Now, all three of the city’s gay Democratic clubs, and thousands of 
individual lesbians and gaymen have united to assure that Harry Britt 
is re-elected to the Board of Supervisors in November. His continued 
place on the Board is important to our community because: 

■ Harry’s leadership has brought tremendous gains to 
lesbians and gay men, and there is much more work 
to be done. Harry wrote the first domestic partners law in the 
country to give us greater equality. He assured a strong city 
response to AIDS by securing over $2 million in spending for 
services, fought hard against police misconduct, and has been 
the leading advocate for reasonable limits on rents. And he has 
done much more. But there is much more work for him to do 
that needs his leadership and the friendships he has built with 
other leaders in the city. 

■ The gay community needs a gay Supervisor. City Hall 
doesn’t respond to our needs just because of our large numbers. 
It has taken strong gay Supervisors like Harvey Milk and 
Harry Britt to press for programs and legislation we need. 

We can’t afford to be without our voice on the Board. 

■ Re-electing Harry Britt will send a strong message 
about the strength of gay and progressive politics. In a 

year that threatens us with the re-election of Ronald Reagan, 
and in which Jerry Falwell is influential, it is important to show 
the country that gay people with humane politics can continue 
to be elected to office. 

On November 6, each of us has six votes to cast for members of the 
Board of Supervisors. It is critical that we all cast one vote to re-elect 
Supervisor Harry Britt. 




Diana Christensen 

Director, Community 
i 'nited A gainst l 'iolence 



Grand Mere Jose I 

The Widow Morton . 


Carole Migden, President 
Harvey Milk Lesbian & Gay 
Democratic Club 

Sal Rosselli, President 
Alice B. Toklas Lesbian/Gay 
Democratic Club 

Paul Boneberg, President 
Stonewall Gay Democratic Club 




Gwenn Craig 

Deputy Sheriff 


Randy Johnson 

Bartender 



Dr. Tom Waddell 

Gay Games Organizer 


Mary Dunlap 

Attorney 


Tim Sockett 

Co-Owner, Sutter's Mill 



Bob Cramer 

Cable Car Awards 


Stan Palomares- 
Criollos 

Community Relations 
Specialist 



Jimmy Stoker 

Artist 

Jay Baughman 

Bank loan officer 


Lenore Chinn 

Artist 


Jim Sandmire 

Metropolitan Community 
Church 


Bernard Pechter 

Stockbroker, 
Co-founder, Sha’ar 
Zahav 


Sal Rosselli 

President, Alice B. Tbklas 
Lesbian/Gay Democratic 
Club 



Paul Boneberg 

President, Stonewall 
Gay Democratic Club 


Dennis Peron 

Marijuana Activist 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 


PAGE 5 


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SMALL BUSINESS & THE LAW 

Partnership Agreements, Leases 
Incorporations, Contracts, 
^ Business Law. 

Rick L. Manring 
k The Sally L. Bracho 

LaW (415)626-5444 

Centers Member, GGBA 

295 Fell Street. Suite B. San Francisco 941 02 - 


LIFE, HEALTH, GROUP INSURANCE, 
ANNUITIES, PENSION PLANS 


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• Estate Planning & Wills 


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Business Law & Litigation 


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Evening & 
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45 Franklin St. 

San Francisco, Ca 
94102 


Couple Without A Country 


(Continued from page 1) 

Anthony Sullivan, an Austra¬ 
lian, came to the United States 
in 1971 on a visit. He met and 
fell in love with an American, 
Richard Adams. In 1972 Sulli¬ 
van returned to the United 
States on a 5-year, renewable 
tourist’s visa to be with Adams. 

Subsequently, Sullivan decid¬ 
ed to put his residence in this 
country on a more sure footing. 
He requested first preference 
status as the spouse of an Amer¬ 
ican citizen. 

Sullivan, in an interview with 
the Bay Area Reporter , talked 
about his reasons for coming out 
of the closet for the U.S. Immi¬ 
gration Service rather than do¬ 
ing what thousands of Gay 
aliens do every year — lie. 

“We thought about it,” Sulli¬ 
van said, “and realized that 
there were thousands of Gay 
couples in this country who have 
to go through this every year. 
We wished that someone some¬ 
place would stand up and con¬ 
test the system. And suddenly it 
dawned on us that we were the 
guys who were going to contest 
it.” 

Sullivan and Adams were 
legally married in Boulder, 
Colorado in 1974. For a 5-week 
period in 1974, the county clerk 
of Boulder, a feminist, per¬ 
formed marriages between 
same-sex couples and issued 
marriage licenses to them. She 
was able to do this legally be¬ 
cause Colorado law at the time 
was gender neutral in the mar¬ 
riage statutes. 

According to United States 
law, an alien married to a U.S. 
citizen has his residence in this 
country virtually assured. But 
the Immigration and Naturali¬ 
zation Service (INS) ruled that 
the marriage was invalid. The 
INS notification, by mail, gave 
the agency’s reasoning: 

“You have failed to establish 
that a bona fide marital relation¬ 
ship can exist between two fag¬ 
gots.” 

The INS ruling was later 
reissued without the word “fag¬ 
gots.” Sullivan and Adams took 
the agency to court to put a stop 
to the agency’s efforts to have 
Sullivan deported. The superior 
court judge was unwilling to 
validate their relationship. 

The couple then appealed to 
the Ninth Circuit Court of Ap¬ 
peals, the last recourse before 
the U.S. Supreme Court. Here 
the judge ruled that the INS did 
not have to follow constitutional 
safeguards in dealing with non¬ 
citizens. 

“We were told,” Sullivan 
said, “that I could be treated in 
a manner that would have been 
unconstitutional when applied 
to an American citizen.” It was 
now 1982 and time was fast run¬ 
ning out on Sullivan’s legal ave¬ 
nues to avoid deportation back 
to Australia. 

Sullivan’s last tactic was to 
use the fact that he had been liv¬ 
ing in the United States for more 
than seven years, and that to 
deport him now would work a 
hardship on him. Under U.S. 
law, residence in the country for 
seven years or more gives an 
alien the right to attempt a 
showing that deportation would 
cause undue hardship. 

At the INS hearing the judge 
simply refused to waive Sulli¬ 
van’s deportation order. 

Sullivan then took his appeal 
for waiver of deportation by 
reason of undue hardship to the 
Board of Immigration Appeals 
in April. 

The board ruled that Sullivan 
had shown that he was of good 
moral (iharacter, that he had 
been in the United States for 


seven years, but that he failed to 
prove that separating him from 
his life partner — Adams — 
would cause him any emotional 
or other hardship. 

The couple’s last chance to re¬ 
main together in the United 
States is to persuade the Ninth 
Circuit Court of Appeals to ask 
the Board of Immigration Ap¬ 
peals to review its decision. Ac¬ 
cording to Sullivan, the court 
may make its decision any day 
after the 28th of this month. A 
rejection of the appeal would 
mean an order giving Sullivan 
17 days, at the most, to leave the 
country. 

Sullivan said, “We have 
agreed that whatever happens 
we will stay together. It means 
separating us from friends we 
have had for 10 years, and from 
the life we have made for our¬ 
selves. We don’t really know 
what we will do. Australia is out 
of the question because they 
don’t recognize our relationship 
either.” 

Asked if he had any regrets 


about having chosen this route 
for achieving permanent resi¬ 
dence in the United States, Sul¬ 
livan said that on some levels he 
did. “As far as the apparent 
destruction of our future here is 
concerned, I am sorry. But on 
another level I’m not at all. We 
found out that we were courage¬ 
ous men, and so often Gay men 
are told that they have no cour¬ 
age. We’ve been totally honest 
and we have no apologies to 
make to anyone for that.” 

“I have personally lost respect 
for the judicial system in this 
country,” Sullivan said, “be¬ 
cause the holder of the scales of 
justice in this country is not 
blindfolded. If we had been a 
heterosexual couple we would 
have been home-free years ago. 
Someone in the Gay community 
has to come forward and say 
that our right to have relation¬ 
ships recognized at law is just as 
important as our right to have 
sex with whom we please. It has 
to become a priority.” ■ 

C. Linebarger 


DEATHS 


John Riccardi 

Sunday, Oct. 14, was gradu¬ 
ation day for our friend John 
Riccardi. John’s love of life, 
spirit and change continues to 
serve as a great inspiration to us 
all. Members of the San Fran¬ 
cisco Gay Men’s Chorus shared 
John’s energy for over 3 l h years, 
including his vision of a national 
tour which he became instru¬ 
mental in making a reality dur¬ 
ing the summer of 1981. 

In remembering our special 
friend we recall a truck named 
“Lucy,” the color yellow, Diana 
Ross, a warm smile, and a closet 
full of warm jackets and sensi¬ 
ble shoes. 

John’s loving parents, three 
brothers, and many friends will 
think of him always. Memorial 
services were held Oct. lb in 
Piscataway, New Jersey. At 

Steven M. Block 

Our beloved friend, Steven M. Block died Sunday morning, 
Oct. 21, in the University Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Steve was diagnosed with pneumocystis pneumonia Oct. 8. 

While in the hospital, Steve wrote notes to visitors saying he 
hoped, when he got out of intensive care, to come back to San 
Francisco. Steve spent most of his adult life in the Bay Area, which 
he considered home and where he was much loved and respected 
as a leader in the Lesbian and Gay community. 

Steve was a brilliant lawyer with a passionate devotion to civil 
liberties and intellectual honesty. He graduated from the Stan¬ 
ford Law School in 1976; then clerked for Judge Robert Peckham 
of the Federal District Court for the Northern District of California 
before beginning practice as an associate at Heller, Ehrman, White 
& McAuliffe. 

In 1983 Steve accepted an appointment as Associate Professor 
of Law at the University of Minnesota Law School. Even after 
moving to Minneapolis, Steve maintained close ties with his friends 
and colleagues in the Bay Area and talked often of returning after 
his stint in Minnesota. 

Steve was the best and most selfless kind of leader in our com¬ 
munity. With no political ambitions of his own, he gave generously 
of his enormous intellect and energies to a number of worthwhile 
organizations. For three years, he led Bay Area Lawyers for Indi¬ 
vidual Freedom (BALIF), the Lesbian and Gay bar association 
dedicated to the preservation and protection of our civil rights. 

He was a moving force in the ACLU Gay Rights Chapter. While 
at Heller-Ehrman he worked on landmark cases involving the 
rights of Lesbians and Gay men to be free of discrimination in 
the workplace and to be treated fairly in military service. He had 
a profound belief that reasonable minds could find common 
ground in constitutional doctrine to allow for exprssion of diver¬ 
sity and self-determination for all groups. 

Among his friends, Steve was notorious for his keen observa¬ 
tions and his scathing wit. Those of us who knew him well will 
miss the ironies that kept us honest and the little kindnesses that 
bespoke the real love he felt for us. Steve is survived by his parents 
and brother, his family of friends, and his community. 

A memorial is to be held at Fort Mason, Building F, Sunday, 
Oct. 28 at 11:30 a.m. Donations in Steve’s memory can be made 
payable to the AIDS Foundation, the ACLU, NGRA or the Les¬ 
bian Rights Project. 

Steve, we’ll miss you! ■ 















































Distrust of Federal Research 
May Thwart Major AIDS Study 

Gay Men Refusing to Join UC-Berkeley Project; 
Researchers Make Plea, Promise Privacy 


by Brian Jones 


A federal study of how AIDS is spread in San Francisco may be canceled because Gay men 
are refusing to take part. Men resisting the study say they are distrustful of the federal govern¬ 
ment and fear that confidential information may find its way to employers or insurance 
companies. 


“The irony is that participation was good until a virus was found,” said Jim Wiley, co¬ 
investigator for the study, The Natural History ' of AIDS in San Francisco. “Now, the issue of 
confidentiality has come down like a big lead brick on our heads. 


The University of Calif ornia- 
Berkeley researchers who are 
conducting the study promise 
strict confidentiality. Their 
research contract bars the re¬ 
lease of any information which 
would identify the study sub¬ 
jects. And, said Dr. David 
Lyman, the project director, “If 
there ever were a case where I 
was ordered to produce the raw 
data, I would burn the files 
first.” 

Despite such assurances, 
most of the Gay men contacted 
at random as potential study 
subjects are refusing to help. 
“The level of resistance in the 
field is incredible,” Wiley said. 

Since spring, 750 men have 
been recruited — almost all of 
them before AIDS confidential¬ 
ity became a controversial topic 
in late August. The study re¬ 
quires another 450 men. The 
deadline to have all 1,200 sub¬ 
jects involved is Dec. 20, but 
recruitment has dwindled. 
“Without more public support, 
we’re not going to make it,” 
Wiley said. 

The researchers’ dilemma 
poses a problem for the Gay 
community as well. The UC- 
Berkeley study is the type of 
epidemiological research Gay 
AIDS activists have demanded 
for more than two years. Now 
that the study has been approv¬ 
ed, funded and begun, the con¬ 
fidentiality fears of Gay men 
may prevent the research from 
taking place. 

THE STUDY 


This is a different question 
than “What causes AIDS?’’ 
Scientists working in laborato¬ 
ries apparently have solved that 
problem. The culprit is Human 
T-cell Leukemia Virus-3, 
HTLV-3 for short. 

It has been proven that 
HTLV-3 causes AIDS, at least 
in some cases, because of several 
accidental infections with the 
virus through blood transfu¬ 
sions. Those who contracted 
AIDS through this route shared 
none of the sexual orientation, 
ethnic or behavioral back¬ 
grounds of the AIDS high-risk 
groups. But when they were in¬ 
fected with the HTLV-3 virus, 
they got AIDS. 

So far, the big money in AIDS 
research has focused on such 
“etiology” — the cause — of the 
disease. Little money or effort 
went into the epidemiology — 
the path — of the disease. For 
the Gay man who wants to keep 
his health, knowing the path¬ 
ways of AIDS is probably more 
important than knowing its 
cause. 

Said Lyman, “As a Gay man, 
I believe our study can do things 
for the Gay community which 
no other research will do.” 

The study starts with a ran¬ 
dom sample of Gay men — 
something no other study has 
done. All previous research is 
based on volunteers, mostly 
from VD clinics, or from the 
Hepatitis B studies which took 
place from 1978 to 1981. 

No one knows if trends 
charted from those groups are 


representative of Gay men as a 
whole. Most researchers pre¬ 
sume they are not representa¬ 
tive. 

The Natural History of AIDS 
study recruits its sample from 
the general population. “If you’ 
get a high enough participation 
among those who are eligible, 
you can generalize about the fac¬ 
tors of those people who are not 
getting ill,” Wiley said. It is a 
big task. 

First, 19 census tracts in San 
Francisco with a high share of 
Gay residents, and AIDS cases, 
were identified. Then, field 
workers began visiting 4,000 
households within those areas, 
seeking men eligible for the 
study. 

Those who fit the study pro¬ 
file, and who agreed to take 
part, began a series of medical 
tests and interviews. The exams 
are highly personal. 

Medical tests require samples 
from each subject every six 
months for a variety of body 
fluids, including semen, blood, 
and saliva. Interviewers inquire 
into sex practices, drug habits, 
exposure to AIDS, and less sen¬ 
sitive topics such as diet, rest, 
and stress. 

GAY MEN’S REACTION 

In April, the HTLV-3 virus 
was discovered. In August, it 
was revealed that the federal 
Centers for Disease Control had 
suggested compiling a national 
registry of people who tested 
positive for the antibody to 
HTLV-3 virus. That disclosure 


made headlines nationwide. It 
couldn't have come at a worse 
time for the AIDS study. 

“We had people who had 
agreed to join up the study be¬ 
come no-shows at the clinic, 
Wiley said. “I started getting 
questions on the phone like, 
‘What would you do if someone 
asked for this information? 
What if they had a subpoena?”’ 

Distrust was one force stalling 
the study. But there was another 
reaction: fear. “I think some 
others are afraid of finding out 
this information for them¬ 
selves,” Wiley said.. 

The contract between the 
federal government and UC- 
Berkeley requires confidentiality 
for study subjects. It states, “No 
information on individuals 
maintained by the contractor 
(UC-Berkeley) shall be . . . 
transferable or accessible at any 
time to any person, organiza¬ 
tional or other governmenal unit 
in any form in which an indi¬ 
vidual is identified by name, 
code number, symbol, or other 
identifying particulars.” 

Lyman said, “After all the 
questions, I went to the Univer¬ 
sity attorney and showed him 
the contract. He said it is 
perfectly defensible in court. 

In September, the researchers 
began a campaign to overcome 
the distrust and regain public 
support for the study. Lyman 
wrote to the Gay doctors’ group. 
Bay Area Physicians for Human 
Rights (BAPHR), on Sept. 0. 

Lyman told the doctors, “I 
understand some members of 
BAPHR have expressed con¬ 
cern about the possibility of 
violation of the confidentiality of 
our participants. Given the sen¬ 
sitive nature of this study, we 
have taken the strongest possi¬ 
ble stand on this issue. We can¬ 
not and will not provide names 
or other identifying information 
about our participants to anyone 
outside of our key investiga¬ 
tors.” 

The researchers published a 
full-page ad in the Bay Area 
Reporter Sept. 13 which repeat¬ 
ed the confidentiality promise. 
I n listing endorsers of the proj¬ 
ect, however, it may have raised 
more distrust than it quelled. 

Mayor Dianne Feinstein was 
listed, even though she personal¬ 
ly ordered police officers to spy 
on Gay men in bathhouses in 
May. Also listed was the De¬ 


partment of Public Health, 
whose director. Dr. Mervyn Sil¬ 
verman, ordered private investi¬ 
gators to spy on Gay men in 
bathhouses in September. 

DON’T TELL YOUR M.D. 

Lyman and Wiley are ada¬ 
mant that the study subjects are 
protected under current law. If 
the law should be changed to 
undermine the confidentiality of 
their subjects, the researchers 
said they would destroy the 
“raw data” which identifies par¬ 
ticipants. 

Research subjects are coun¬ 
seled to protect their own confi¬ 
dentiality. One risk for informa¬ 
tion being unknowingly shared 
with insurance companies — 
and thus, employers — is 
through private physicians, the 
researchers said. 

If a research subject is told, 
for example, that he has the 
antibody to HTLV-3 virus, he 
may immediately tell his private 
physician. That information be¬ 
comes part of a medical file and, 
usually, part of the file for the in¬ 
surance coverage which pays for 
the person’s medical care. 

The importance of most of the 
test results is unknown. For ex¬ 
ample, a positive test for the 
HTLV-3 antibody means you 
have been exposed to the sup¬ 
posed AIDS virus — but does it 
mean you will get AIDS? Or 
does it mean you are immune? 
No one knows. 

“There’s really no reason at 
present to want to know these 
results,” said Wiley. “Their only 
significance is in generalized re¬ 
search. We will tell the subject 
if he really wants to know. But, 
if that s the case, we tell them 
personally — not their physi¬ 
cian. ” 

For prospective study par¬ 
ticipants, there are many rea¬ 
sons to refuse to join the re¬ 
search: the time, the tests, the 
personal questions, the lingering 
doubts about confidentiality. 
Yet, for the Gay community, the 
study is undeniably a needed 
one. 

“We re already finding out 
things which challenge some 
widely held myths." Lyman 
said. “For example, the ratio of 
exposure (to the HTLV-3 virus), 
based on a couple of hundred 
samples so far. appears to be 
much less than the (>0 percent 
which had been reported. ■ 


The Natural History of AIDS 
in San Francisco seeks to answer 
questions frequently asked by 
Gay men: What factors put peo¬ 
ple at high risk for the disease? 
What lifestyle factors seem to 
lower the risk? What share of 
the Gay community has been ex¬ 
posed to the HTLV-3 virus, the 
presumed cause of AIDS? 

Most basically, the study 
asks, “How is AIDS spread?” 


Elves, Fairy Queens 
To Patrol Halloween 

Reliable sources have it that 
the ghastlies and ghoulies, trolls 
and the evil eye will again be 
roving during our celebration. 
To that end, Community United 
Against Violence (CUAV) will 
be organizing and training safe¬ 
ty monitors to patrol on the 
evenings of both Sat., Oct. 27 
and Wed., Oct. 31. 

All volunteers must attend 
one of the training sessions to be 
held at MCC, 150 Eureka, at 
the following times: Sat., Oct. 
27, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 
Mon., Oct. 29, 7 to 9 p.m. 

Last year’s celebration was 
one of the safest on record — 
due in large part to the presence 
of safety monitors. Help do your 
part to make your community, 
your friends, and yourself safe 
and happy — be a Halloween 
safety monitor. Contact Suz¬ 
anne Gautier at 8t>4-3112. ■ 


non 

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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 PAGE 7 

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Open foruM 

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VOL. XIV NO. 43 OCTOBER 25, 1984 NEXT ISSUE OUT: NOVEMBER 1 NEXT DEADLINE: OCTOBER 26 


Viewpoint Letters 



(Photo: Rink) 


A Job Well Done 

The Reagan Administration’s approach to the AIDS 
epidemic is to throw words at it. Early this year, the Secretary 
of Health and Human Services, Margaret Heckler, called the 
epidemic “the nation’s number one health priority. Heckler’s 
actions since then have put the lie to her words. 

This spring, the administration proposed to spend about $54 
million for AIDS research in 1985 — roughly the same amount 
as was spent this year. But the discovery of the virus which 
causes AIDS, announced in April, added new urgency to 
research funding. Dr. Edward Brandt, Jr., Heckler’s assis¬ 
tant secretary and the director of the Public Health Service, 
said $3t) million more would be needed in 1985. He detailed 
what the needs were, in light of the AIDS virus discovery, in 
a memo sent to Heckler in May. 

All through the summer, Heckler did nothing. In August, 
she finally responded to Brandt — telling him to reallocate 
funds from other health programs into AIDS research. In so 
doing, Heckler revealed the depths of cynicism and cruelty in¬ 
herent in Reaganomics: to fight the suffering from one disease, 
take away resources from other health programs. 

Fortunately, Congress rebuffed the Ad- 
j ministration. For that, we have Sen. Alan 
| Cranston, the California Democrat, to thank. 

! Cranston single-handedly shepherded a $14 
| million addition into the AIDS budget. 

When Congress finished its work, nearly 
[ $93 million for AIDS research was approved. 
The money bill included precisely the funding 
| which had been recommended by the Admin- 
! istration’s own AIDS expert, Dr. Brandt. 
Regrettably, Brandt resigned the same day 
the AIDS bill passed. Does anyone wonder why? 

The Gay community owes Sen. Cranston — and Dr. Brandt 
— the praise of a job well done. Each and every one of us owes 
a vote Nov. 6 to throw Reagan and Heckler out of office. We 
demand funds, not cynical promises. We demand compassion, 
not cruelty. Our votes, this year, could mean life or death in 
the struggle against AIDS. 

A Job Undone 

On the subject of AIDS research, there is trouble on the home 
front. For quite some time, Gay activists have been demand¬ 
ing federal research into how AIDS is spread. This year, $15 
million was appropriated in five cities to examine that ques¬ 
tion. Here in San Francisco, a promising, $3 million study may 
be canceled. The problem is that Gay men are refusing to take 
part in the study, The Natural History of AIDS in San 
Francisco. 

The men are worried about confidentiality. In a broad sense, 
we don’t blame them. Public health authorities have done much 
to undermine faith in themselves this summer and fall. The 
federal government secretly suggested a registry of people with 
the antibody to the AIDS virus. And Dr. Mervyn Silverman 
ordered private eyes to secretly spy on Gay men having sex in 
the baths. Actions such as these work to destroy the trust which 
long has existed between the public health establishment and 
the Gay community. 

Yet, the failure of the local AIDS study would be a tragedy. 
The UC-Berkeley study holds real hope of providing informa¬ 
tion which may help Gay men save their health and their lives. 
This newspaper — which initially raised the confidentiality 
issue during the summer — has examined the study. We believe 
there are adequate safeguards to protect research subjects’ con¬ 
fidentiality. We urge Gay men to participate. 

Brian Jones 


The First Step 

An open letter to Dr. Mervyn Silverman 

★ While I laud your concern over AIDS, it does not 
seem clear that the closure of the bathhouses will save 
any lives. First of all, the CDC’s study seems to in¬ 
dicate that bathhouse patrons are no more at risk than 
the general homosexual population of San Francisco. 

Second, there is a point after which additional deter¬ 
rence will not only not prevent an undesirable act from 
being committed, but rather the additional risk of be¬ 
ing caught or censured will actually attract a marginal 
element of the population to it. 

Third, sex is such a strong and instantaneously grati¬ 
fying pleasure that people will find other places to 
engage in it, some of which will not be as hygenic or 
safe as the bathhouses and which may even be public, 
thus inviting arrest and scorn from the citizenry. 

Fourth, as the Bay Area Physicians for Human 
Rights has pointed out, closing the baths eliminates 
an opportunity for education and observation. 

More importantly, members of the Gay communi¬ 
ty now feel that your true concern was not for health 
but politics as you cut off any chance that the Gay com¬ 
munity could solve the problem itself by implementing 
the plan of the SF AIDS Foundation just as the plan 
was taking final form. 

My greatest concern, however, is that the civil rights 
of the Gay community are being infringed dramatically. 
Although I do not consider myself an alarmist, the 
closure of the baths surely is the first step to the 
recriminalization of sodomy and perhaps the quaran¬ 
tine of homosexual men. 

In short, I believe you have made an error that has 
set back Gay rights and has destroyed the confidence 
of the Gay community in you and the administration. 
Perhaps it is just as well as it may provoke Gay men 
and Lesbians (as well as other minorities) to work 
harder to promote and protect themselves. 

George R. Lanyi 
San Francisco 


A Bleak Day 

★ The ninth of October was a bleak day for civil rights 
in our beloved city. Clad in the cynical drag of con¬ 
cerned, compassionate altruism, those who would 
deprive Gay men of their hard-won freedom of associa¬ 
tion and of consensual sexual activity drove the open¬ 
ing wedge of their campaign. The ordering of the baths 
and “sex clubs" lent yet greater credibility to Orwell’s 
prescience in this Falwellian, long-dreaded year of 1984. 

Everybody knows that Gay bars (just like straight 
ones) are frequently the sites of “pick-ups” for (slight¬ 
ly) later sex at home. How long will it be before our 
“protectors,” both straight and Gay, insist — for our 
good — that they be padlocked? 

Everybody knows that Gays (just like straights) 
arrange assignations on the streets. Since streets can¬ 
not be padlocked, perhaps our “protectors” will de¬ 
mand that we be padlocked. By then, it is to be ex¬ 
pected that all of our “protectors” will be straight. The 
Gay ones will have awakened. By then, it will be too 
late. 

Charlie Morrison 
San Francisco 


Say Hello 

★ I agree with you that closing the bathhouses was 
a political move, not a health move to stop the spread 
of AIDS. Yes, people are dying, but the statistics show 
not everyone will contract or die from this disease. 6,000 
cases nationwide is not the black plague that killed 
millions in Europe during the middle ages. I see so 
much alcohol and drug abuse in this city, the so-called 


Gay mecca; estimates put the substance abuse at an 
alarming 30%. How many people have been abusing 
these substances over the years, burning the candle at 
both ends, etc. The so-called Gay lifestyle is a very 
unhappy, lonely, and alienated one. Not just society 
loathes us, but a lot of each other do too. A lot of us 
reject our brothers and sisters because he or she is the 
wrong color, or female. The way we dress is offensive 
even amongst ourselves. People hate leather or the clone 
look, or the chick look or you name it. I walk down 
Castro or Polk or Folsom and people ignore you. 
They’ve internalized their fear and hate for one another. 
To deny your brother or sister is to deny yourself. If 
we don’t care about each other, who will? Getting fund¬ 
raisers and lobbying politicians alone won’t get the job 
done. When you walk down the street tomorrow smile 
and say hello, not to just the cute ones, or the ones who 
are your type. A smile won’t cost you and you might 
make someone’s day. 

Gary Patterson 
San Francisco 


Merv’s Award 

★ May we have the envelope, please? . . . Previous 
winners in this category have been Anita Bryant, Jerry 
F alwell, and John Briggs. And now this year’s winner 
for Most Pious Performance in a Press Conference: our 
own Dr. Merv Silverman. 

S. C. Narland 
San Francisco 


Homophobes All? 

★ Last Friday night I attended a meeting called to pro¬ 
test closing the baths. I left during the course of the 
meeting, not because I agree with closure, but because 
the total certainty with which this move, and everyone 
who supports it, were branded as homophobic and un¬ 
concerned with civil rights, bothers me. 

Lots of homophobes want to see the baths and other 
sex places closed. But not everyone who takes this posi¬ 
tion is, ipso facto, homophobic. Most distressing to me 
was that those making these allegations included people 
publically committed to the reelection of President 
Reagan. While people such as Dr. Silverman, Harry 
Britt, and Marcus Conant — to name three of the most 
commonly attacked names — have lead the fight for 
greater resources for research and treatment of AIDS, 
most of this money has been won despite the total lack 
of support of the Reagan administration. This presi¬ 
dent, who is constantly crying for the lives of the un¬ 
born, has yet to express a word of concern for the several 
thousand dead from AIDS. 

I can sympathize with the passion of those who 
oppose Dr. Silverman’s actions. But they would 
strengthen their — our — case immensely if they 
recognized that they do not have a monopoly on either 
good will or concern. 

Dennis Altman 
San Francisco 


Letter Policy 

★ The Bay Area Reporter welcomes your letters 
to the editor. Letters must be signed; anonymous 
letters will not be published. Please include your 
mailing address and telephone number so we may 
verify your letter — this information will not be 
published. 

In order to print as many views as possible, we 
ask letter writers to be brief. To promote diversity 
in the Open Forum, we favor letters from writers 
who do not appear frequently, over repeated cor¬ 
respondence from a single author. 




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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 8 





















Letters 


Blame 

The following was written to the Chronicle. 

★ In your editorial of Oct. 10, you state about AIDS 
that, “its cause is connected to some of the sexual prac¬ 
tices that define their homosexuality.” Gay and bisex¬ 
ual men, and their sexual acts, did not cause AIDS 
anymore than women cause breast cancer or children 
cause polio. Why did you make such a statement? I 
am angry when I read your slanted reporting of the 
AIDS crisis, and I realize the danger of your inaccuracy 
when I hear people parroting what you've written, like 
how the woman who contracted AIDS through a blood 
transfusion was an innocent bystander. Who the hell 
isn't an innocent bystander in the face of this terrible 
epidemic? 

Yes, you're right that an epidemic of this propor¬ 
tion would have received different attention if Gay and 
bisexual men were not the main sufferers. If this disease 
were prevalent in the whole community there would 
be a daily national vigil for all concerned, enormous 
research spending, the declaration of a mandate for sup¬ 
port and cure of those who are affected, and no talk 
about who caused it. The lack of this sort of widespread 
response is evidence of profound homophobia. Its result 
is genocide of the groups of people at risk for AIDS. 

Anthony Rice Ricco 
San Francisco 


A Place to Relax 

★ I live in San Francisco and work at a store in the 
city until 2:30 in the morning. There is a 24-hour 
restaurant across the street from my place of business, 
but by 2:30 a.m. it is crowded with “punk rockers” 
and the drunks of the neighborhood — not what I con¬ 
sider a place to relax. 

I could go home and play music or watch TV — and 
wake up the others in the building. Or I can go to an 
after-hours club two blocks away from where I live. 
It’s safe to walk to and safe to walk home from. I have 
a place to relax, drink coffee, and visit with friends from 
the neighborhood who have the same hours I do. 

This place also allows sexual activities in another area 
of the building, and because of this the city has closed 
the establishment. 

I would first of all like to know what legal right 
anyone has to close these clubs. As the commentary 
in the Tuesday Chronicle (10/16/84) said, “It is the 
person, not the place” that causes diseases to get out 
of hand. 

There are rotten apples everywhere, but we’ll still 
eat and enjoy the good ones. Let us keep our heads in 
this matter, and not make many suffer for what a few 
do. 

T. Boyd 
San Francisco 


Close the Baths 

★ Bathhouse owners have attempted to cloud the re¬ 
cent public health closure of their facilities by calling 
it a “civil rights issue.” It is not a civil rights issue. At 
stake may possibly be the very survival of our 
community. 

Contrary to earlier reports, AIDS may not be a dif¬ 
ficult disease to catch. As our experience with the 
disease increases, and as the number of persons with 
the disease continues to rise, we have discovered a possi¬ 
ble latency period of up to five years. Recent reports 
have implicated saliva as harboring the virus. It could 
be that the only safe sex alternative is no sex. 

AIDS is now firmly entrenched in our community. 
The possibilities for contact and transmission of the 
disease have increased exponentially. It is quite possi¬ 
ble that a total treatment for this disease may never 
be discovered. Development of a vaccine for preven¬ 
tion at this point seems years away. 

Gay men must be totally cognizant of these factors. 
Rationalizations such as “They’ll develop a pill for it 
any day now,” or “As long as I’m not anally active, 
I’m not at risk,” just are not realistic. Bathhouse owners 
realize this; they must know' that behaviour that places 
persons at risk is occurring in their facilities. 

Close the baths! 

Mark Hoffman 
San Francisco 


Responsibility 

The following was written to Carl Nolte of the 
Chronicle. 

In reference to your article “City Gives Court Its Sex 
Report On Bathhouses,” which appeared in the San 
Francisco Chronicle (10/12/84) on page 2,1 would like 
to say the following: 

Whether or not shareholders or property owners are 
responsible for the actions of the businesses they in¬ 
vest in or lease space to is definitely a valid issue. 
However, I feel it to be off-center as concerns this AIDS 
epidemic. 

Nowhere have I read of AIDS being caused by a 
place. 

Behavior, the scapegoat for us all, is at the root of 
promoting or preventing the spread of AIDS. 

Wherever sex is possible is where AIDS can be pro¬ 
moted or prevented. 

Ultimately, a personal, individual decision promotes 
or prevents the spread of AIDS. 


Education is the most effective tool available in the 
altering of behavior that promotes AIDS, while re¬ 
search actively searches for a cure. 

To lay responsibility and/or blame for this epidemic 
anywhere outside the virus itself is clearly outside the 
issue. 

To lay responsibility and/or blame for the spread 
of AIDS outside the individual is again clearly outside 
the issue. 

Both sexual partners equally share responsibility for 
preventing or promoting the spread of AIDS. The issue 
rests soundly here and nowhere else. What sexual prac¬ 
tices two individuals decide to engage in ultimately 
determines whether or not they are promoting or 
preventing AIDS. Every participant in a risky sexual 
practice is a promoter of AIDS. 

Jack Manse 
San Francisco 


Too Much 

.★Asa member of Harvey Milk’s original constituency 
I must admit I have never considered Harry Britt a 
brilliant supervisor, though not, on balance, unsup- 
portable. He has even seemed likeable at times. His 
role this year in the city’s attempts to regulate individual 
consciences, however, has proven too much for this 
voter. Supervisor Britt’s latest comments on the issue 
of the baths (Mike Hippier, Bay Area Reporter, 
Oct. 18, 1984) are worse than wrong-headed. They are 
incomprehensible, which is perhaps only to be expected 
from someone who seems to have spent most of the year 
obscuring his stand on the question lest he be held 
accountable for anything resembling an idea. 

Supervisor Britt states that he is against the closing 
of the baths, but that if Silverman, Feinstein and some 
self-righteous doctors want to do their best to dose them 
they should be allowed to pursue this course unopposed 
by politicians such as himself. The courts will surely 
protect us — if we deserve protecting (evidently the ar¬ 
ticle was written before Judge Mullins’ temporary 
restraining order). I have no doubt that this is the kind 
of blithering idiocy that the supervisor mistakes for 
political acumen. 

Either there is a question of civil liberty raised by 
the moves of Silverman and Feinstein or there isn’t, 
and if there is, it is exactly the kind of issue an elected 
public official must take a clear stand on. 

Mike Black 
San Francisco 


Suicide? 

• Our esteemed mayor has justified Silverman’s deci¬ 
sion on bathhouses by saying, “You see someone try¬ 
ing to commit suicide, you do your level best to pre¬ 
vent it.” 

I propose that our community join Dianne in her 
crusade against suicide. Let us apply the same princi¬ 
ple to other high-risk activities by circulating a peti¬ 
tion asking the mayor to prevent suicide in the follow¬ 
ing ways: 

• Close all stores which continue to sell cigarettes in 
the face of lung cancer statistics. 

• Close all freeways in the face of continued highway 
carnage despite the 55 mph speed limit. 

• Close down California so as to prevent mass suicide 
by earthquake. 

• Close down churches to keep heterosexuals from mar¬ 
rying and having children, thus preventing all risk of 
suicide for everyone. 

• Life isn’t about liberation. It’s about disease and 
death. Who needs civil rights? Let’s save money on city 
medical expenses instead. We’ll call our crusade “Save 
America’s Children from Themselves. ” Won’t you join 
Dianne and me in this noble effort? Send your con¬ 
tributions to: Citizens for a Risk-Free America, P.O. 
Box 007, Lynchburg, Virginia. 

You won’t regret it. 

Jim Jones, Jr. 
San Francisco 


Who’s Guilty — of What? 

★ There are many things that are being overlooked 
amid the hysteria of AIDS. When one looks at the raw 
data supplied by the CDC one sees a picture quite dif¬ 
ferent than what is represented by the homophobic 
media. My greatest concern these days is the obvious 
return of self-hatred among Gay men. What do we 
mean when we talk of “an innocent person who might 
contract AIDS?” Do we imply that there are people 
who deserve to get the diseases related to AIDS? 

It is time for us to stand united as we have in the 
past when confronted with less serious political issues. 
We, too, have fallen prey to the vicious anti-Gay 
interpretations of AIDS. We are beginning to believe 
that Gay men are responsible for creating AIDS just 
as the non-Gay media believes that children, women 
and heterosexual males catch AIDS from Gay men. 

The fact that the city of San Francisco was able to 
close down the bathhouses with little opposition from 
the Gay community worries me more than AIDS. The 
fact that Dr. Silverman was able to equate Gay sex with 
Russian roulette (even in one’s own bedroom) worries 
me more than AIDS. Perhaps it doesn't matter any¬ 
more that Gay men are dying. It seems as though we 
have all died already. The only question left to all of 
us is “are we also willing to dig our own graves? " 

Robert Starkey 
San Francisco 



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ETTERS 


Stop Kopp 

• I must admit to being absolutely astonished upon 
reading the Bay Area Reporter’s feature story on 
Quentin Kopp. The article states that Kopp has en¬ 
dorsed or voted for every piece of Lesbian and Gay 
rights legislation which has come before the Board of 
Supervisors. Nothing could be further from the truth. 
Since the passage of Harvey Milk’s ordinance in 1978 
the Board has not exactly been deluged with Lesbian 
and Gay rights legislation, but on most issues which 
have been of importance to our community, Kopp has 
consistently proven to be an enemy to our cause. 

Perhaps the single most important piece of Les¬ 
bian/Gay rights legislation to come before the Board 
of Supervisors in the last six years was the domestic 
partners ordinance. Kopp certainly voted against that. 
But quite apart from being against basic civil rights 
for Lesbian and Gay people, Kopp has often gone out 
of his way to vote against our concerns in an offensive 
and bigoted manner. 

• When voting against a commendation for Phyllis 
Lyon and Del Martin on the occasion of their 25th an¬ 
niversary, he asked ‘twenty-five years of what?” He 
then summarized his position by stating “tolerance yes, 
glorification no.” 

• He has voted against street closures in conjunction 
with the Castro Street Fair. 

• He voted against the Jaguar Book Store in 1981. 

• He voted against establishing the Office of Citizens’ 
Complaints in spite of a long record of police abuse 
against Lesbian and Gay people. 

• Just recently, he voted against Supervisor Hongisto’s 
legislation which would have prevented homophobic 
police officers from being assigned to cases involving 
Lesbian and Gay issues. 

• His attack on our community in the July 1,1984 issue 
of The New York Times shows the level of contempt 
which this man harbors towards Lesbian and Gay 
people. Kopp said “. . . the Democratic Party is out 
of touch, catering to special interest groups like the 
gays . . . My constituency was absolutely astonished 
by the Gay Freedom Day Parade. A sizable number 
expressed revulsion.” 

Kopp’s attacks go far beyond insensitivity. When 
a member of our government uses words like “revul¬ 
sion” to describe us, it is not only a source of great pain 
to our community, it is a demonstration of deep-seated 
homophobia. And, when these words are used in a 
calculated manner to exploit society’s hatred against 
us, we must not let them go unchallenged. 

The Stonewall Gay Democratic Club voted to con¬ 
demn Kopp at its July meeting, the day after his com¬ 
ments appeared in The New York Times. Stonewall 
has since been joined by the Alice B. Toklas and Harvey 
Milk Lesbian/Gay Democratic clubs, and Kopp’s Gay¬ 
baiting attacks on the Democratic Party have also caus¬ 
ed him to be unanimously censured by the County 
Democratic Central Committee of San Francisco. 

Kopp is apparently the only elected official in San 
Francisco who excludes Lesbian and Gay people from 
his constituency. During the Democratic National Con¬ 
vention, he was the only elected official in San Fran¬ 
cisco to attack our city, the Democratic Party, and Gay 
people. Now, he is running for reelection, and he also 
hopes to become president of the Board of Supervisors 
by being the top vote-getter. 

Each time Quentin Kopp stands for reelection, he 
skillfully manipulates the issues and the media in such 
a manner that the public is often sufficiently confused 
to give him more votes than anyone else. If Kopp is 
top vote-getter this time, he will automatically become 
president of the board. Lesbian and Gay voters should 
be warned: if Kopp becomes president, not only will 
he be the leading candidate to be the next mayor, he 
will have the power to make crucial committee 
assignments on the Board of Supervisors. These 
assignments will strongly affect the type of legislation 
that is generated by the board. Given Kopp’s record 
of insensitivity and contempt for our community, every 
Lesbian and Gay voter should be gravely concerned. 

Stonewall is mounting a massive campaign to inform 
the Lesbian and Gay electorate of Kopp’s attitude 
towards our community. We intend to get the word out 
about Kopp and his attacks on us. Watch out for our 
MUNI Metro billboards, buttons, direct mail, and 
newspaper advertisements. And, on Nov. 6, we hope 
that people will express their revulsion and STOP 
KOPP! 

Ralph Payne, Political Vice President 
Stonewall Gay Democratic Club 
San Francisco 


Federal AIDS Funding 

★ The 98th Congress adjourned on Oct. 12, com¬ 
pleting action on two bills which included funding for 
federal research into the cause and cure for Acquired 
Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). 

As you know, the fight to obtain adequate funding 
for this critical research has been long and hard; this 
Administration has resisted taking seriously this 
insidious disease. I am gratified that Congress took the 
responsibility to provide the funds necessary' to carry 
on the battle against AIDS. 

The Labor-Health and Human Services appropria¬ 
tions bill for Fiscal Year 1985 provides more than $84 
million for research on AIDS. The continuing ap¬ 
propriations resolution — covering those agencies 
whose regular appropriations bills have not passed — 
provides $8.35 million for the Food and Drug Ad¬ 
ministration to test and license AIDS drugs, vaccines, 
and blood-screening tests. The total amount of federal 
spending on AIDS will be approximately $92 million. 


The centers for Disease Control will receive $18.7 
million; the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health 
Administration, $1.3 million; and the National Institute 
of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (part of the National 
Institutes of Health), $46.3 million — NIH also receiv¬ 
ed a large increase in its overall research budget and 
is expected to spend at least $20 million beyond this 
amount. 

I will continue to urge both the Administration and 
my colleagues in Congress to commit the federal govern¬ 
ment to a full-scale effort to eradicate AIDS. 

Sala Burton 
Member of Congress 
5th District, California 


Keep Up the Humor 

★ Sometimes it seems there is a lot of downbeat news. 
I’d like to congratulate Dug Figley on his lighthearted 
outlook. 

Asa silly person and early riser, I can relate to his 
cartoon of Oct. 18. I think I’ve been out with the same 
person. 

Keep up the good humor. 

David H. Lee 
San Francisco 


‘Safe Sex’ Misguided 

★ The latest effort to enlist “community pressure” to 
enforce “Politically Correct” (“Safe”) Sex is, at best, 
misguided. The AIDS Foundation can be credited for 
promoting common sense ideas about sex, but it should 
be noted they are talking about pure speculation when 
saying one sexual behavior or another is related to 
AIDS. There is no scientific evidence, in fact, that any 
sexual behavior is linked to AIDS. 

To transform these ideas into mandatory sexual 
behavior enforced with vigilantic tactics is outside any 
acceptable role for the AIDS Foundation. Contribu¬ 
tions have been made in good faith to deal with vic¬ 
tims and potential victims of AIDS, not to assist the 
AIDS Foundation in becoming a power broker with 
the mayor, political clubs, or city agencies. 

It should also be noted that using medical “experts” 
to decide what is “safe sex” does not mean the ideas 
are valid. You may recall that aside from religion, 
medicine has probably caused more suffering among 
homosexuals than any other institution. For decades 
it was the official policy of the medical establishment 
that homosexuality was a disease to be cured. There 
is no reason to believe they still do not have that 
objective. 

Even more ridiculous is dragging in the “Gay/Les¬ 
bian political” clubs. If these people want to tell us to 
vote for Lia Belli and Jimmy Carter or Richard Nix¬ 
on or Ronald Reagan that is their right; they have no 
right to impose their particular ideas about sexual be¬ 
havior any more than the Milpitas Republican club 
does. 

This absurdity could only happen in San Francico 
where the political clubs have become agents of govern¬ 
ment and long since given up any semblance of repre¬ 
senting Gay liberation. In fact, that has been specifical¬ 
ly rejected by the Milk Club who now defines “Gay/ 
Lesbian liberation” as having a job as a congressional 
aide, as getting to sit next to the mayor at a fundraiser, 
or having fat research grants directed to your political 
cronies. 

Despite endless self-praise about its good work on 
AIDS, in fact the Milk Club has done more harm than 
good. When the extent of possible contagion of AIDS 
was being exaggerated to gain research funds, the Milk 
Club’s “education” served to spread fear and paranoia 
inside and outside the Gay community. Further, the 
attack on baths spread to damage many other Gay 
businesses (denied by the Milk Club’s spokesman but 
confirmed by the San Francisco Business Journal ). 
While we cannot doubt the political ambitiousness of 
the political clubs, we can certainly doubt their good 
judgment. 

Jerry Jansen 
San Francisco 

ED. NOTE: So-called “Safe Sex”guidelines — 
actually, guidelines to lower the risk of transmit¬ 
ting AIDS through sex — are based on much more 
than “pure speculation.” Several studies have 
shown statistically significant correlations between 
certain sex practices, such as anal-receptive sex, 
and AIDS. 

There is also, no doubt, any longer, that HTLV-3 
via blood transfusion into recipients who share 
none of the other risk factors or medical histories 
of Gay men is proof positive that HTLV-3 causes 
AIDS. The HTLV-3 virus has been found in blood 
and semen of Gay men in test research groups (in¬ 
terestingly, the virus seems to be dead in correlary 
groups of Gay men already diagnosed with AIDS j. 
A study now underway is expected to show pres¬ 
ence of active HTLV-3 virus in saliva. 

So, no, there is no absolute, conclusive proof — 
yet — that AIDS is spread through sexual contact. 
But we are 99percent sure. Knowing that, anyone 
who argues, at this late date, that all the scientific 
evidence is “pure speculation ” is whistling in the 
dark. Anybody with any sense, and sense of 
responsibility, should accept the great probability 
that AIDS can be spread through exchange of body 
fluids — and moderate their behavior accordingly. 

Brian Jones 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 10 












































POLITICS AND POKER 


The Legislature’s Last 
Liberal Republican 



The Republican Democrat. Or is it Democratic Republican ? State Sen. 
Milton Marks has brought home the bacon for Gay-related programs. (Photo: 
Rink) 


A fter nearly four years of 
Ronald Reagan, it is be¬ 
coming difficult to even 
think of voting for a Republican. 
State Senator Milton Marks is 
the exception. Though Marks’ 
name appears on the Repub¬ 
lican ticket, the independent 
legislator rarely pays attention to 
his party line and is, in fact, 
more of a Democrat than a 
Republican. 

I have known Senator Marks 
for 15 years and he understands 
our problems and has been suc¬ 
cessful in translating our con¬ 
cerns into legislation and state 
funding. Marks is probably the 
last liberal Republican in the 
California legislature. He has 
worked hard to educate his less 
understanding Republican col¬ 
leagues about our needs. To a 
large extent he has been suc¬ 
cessful in those efforts. 

On SF-910, co-authored with 
Senator Roberti, which created 
the AIDS Advisory Committee, 
he was successful in winning the 
support of the majority of Re¬ 
publicans in the Senate. On 
AG-1 and AB-848, he garnered 
enough Republican votes to en¬ 
sure the bills’ passage. 

In the past, Marks co¬ 
authored the Consenting Adults 
legislation, which is now law. 
He authored SB-184, which re¬ 
quires the San Francisco Re¬ 
development Agency to comply 
with our Gay Rights Ordinance. 
And he helped corral the votes 
needed to pass AB-858. Other 
measures supported by Marks 
are: 

• AB-2102, which requires that 
profits from the retelling of a 
crime not go to the criminal, but 
to the criminal’s victims, or their 
beneficiaries. 

• AB-1, which passed both 
houses but was vetoed by Deuk- 
mejian. 

• SB-910, which was signed in¬ 
to law, and AIDS Education 
funding — $500,000 in 1983, 
and $1 million in 1984. 

On the AIDS funding, Marks 
introduced in 1983 a line item in 
a friendly subcommittee, and 
ultimately this amount was in¬ 


cluded in the budget and kept 
there by the Governor. These 
monies supported 15 AIDS 
Educational programs through¬ 
out the state, including three in 
San Francisco. In 1984, Marks, 
recognizing the need for inten¬ 
sified education on AIDS, pro¬ 
posed that the amount be dou¬ 
bled, and won. Marks then suc¬ 
cessfully urged the Republican 
Governor to keep the full 
amount in the budget, even 
though Assembly Republicans 
fought to have him veto all or 
part of the funds. 

Most recently, Milton Marks 
has worked closely with the 
Department of Health Services 
to ensure that all of the monies 
appropriated go to AIDS Edu¬ 
cation and that San Francisco 
gets its fair share. He held a 
workshop for local agencies so 
that their grant proposals would 
better respond to the State’s Re- 


WAYNE FRIDAY 


quest for Proposals. 

The Senator has also met 
recently with AIDS providers 
and hospital administrators to 
determine what additional pro¬ 
blems relating to AIDS can be 
addressed by the state. 

I know Milton Marks well, 
and I firmly believe that, party 
politics aside, this is one man the 
Gay and Lesbian community 
cannot afford to lose. He has 
consistently been there when we 
needed him; he needs our sup¬ 
port Nov. 6. 

★ ★ ★ 

W ho won Sunday night’s 
“Great Debate”? From 
our viewpoint, neither 
won, though Ronald Reagan 
did better than the previous 
debate. The respected News¬ 
week polls said this week that 
Republican Reagan won, by a 
close 43-40 percent. 

Mondale’s people have to be 
dissappointed that the former 
vice president failed to deliver 
the all-important knock-out 
punch. Even Mondale, though 
claiming he won the debate, 
conceded that Ronald Reagan 
“did better” this time around. 

Toklas president Sal Roselli 
was sworn in Tuesday to a seat 
on the city’s Human Rights 
Commission. • Even some lib¬ 
eral Democrats are surprised 
that Assemblyman Tom Hay¬ 
den’s campaign is making an 
issue of the little-known fact that 
his GOP opponent in the 44th 
Assembly District received a 
court martial back in 1967 for 
possession of a mere 2.068 
grams of the stimulant amphet¬ 
amine. It is a cheap shot, par¬ 
ticularly in view of Tom Hay¬ 
den’s past. • The Examiner 
editorially supported Prop. 37 
(the state lottery) while opposing 
both Prop. 36 (the Jarvis taxa¬ 
tion amendment) and Prop. 38 
(English-only voting materials). 

Y ou read it here first: officials 
of the Miss America Pageant an¬ 
nounced that future contestants 
may have to swear that they’re 
not transsexuals, but will not 
have to promise they’ve never 
posed for nude photos. 

S o Dan White is aching to 
return to San FraUcisco. 
White’s former City Hall 
(Continued on next page) 



Whitebusters. Return of Dan White, the prodigal son, sparks plans for 
welcome home party at 18th and Castro. 




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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 11 

























































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POLITICS 


(Continued from previous page) 

aide and campaign manager 
Kay Sloan told the Chron’s 
Warren Hinckle that Dan “just 
can t wait to get home and be 
with his friends.” Well, maybe 
we could give the son-of-a-bitch 
a welcome home party at the 
corner of 18th and Castro 
streets. This filthy creep has a lot 
of gall to even think he dares 
come back to a city he tore 
apart. Dan White is a mur¬ 
derous pig who deserves to be 
treated as such, and he can 
never come back to this city — 
never! 

Former Congresswoman 
Bella Abzug will appear at a 
fundraiser-luncheon for super- 
visoral candidate Pat Norman 
at the Marines’ Memorial Club 
on Sutter Street Nov. 1; tix are 
$5 and can be obtained by call¬ 
ing 021-1780. 

The only Halloween card I 
received so far came to the Bay 
Area Reporter office this week. 
The outside cover of the card 
carried a headline proclaiming 
“Reagan Re-elected!”. Inside 
the card read, “This is the 
scariest card I could find; Hap¬ 
py Halloween!” 

Gael Sapiro, Connie O’Con¬ 
nor, Law Wilson and Sal Ros- 
selli are among Toklas Dems 
giving a no-host cocktail fund¬ 
raiser for Carol Ruth Silver next 
Tuesday (Oct. 30, 5:30-7:30) at 
the home of Steve Walters; don¬ 
ors choice of $15 on up re¬ 
quested; 641-8965 or 641-8866 
for info. 

Supervisor Molinari’s cam¬ 
paign announced that the pop¬ 
ular supe has recently been en¬ 
dorsed by District One Political 
Action, The Golden Gate Demo 
Club, San Francisco Tomorrow, 
and the Transport Workers 
union. 



Is It a Frame-Up? No, just some Halloween politicking at the Beaux Arts 
Ball for Supervisor Louise Renne. (Photo: Rink) 

Louise Renne Holds 
City’s Porse-Strings 

Finance Chair Has Supported 
Numerous Gay Projects 


A ccording to Dr. David 
Sencer, the city’s Health 
Commissioner, recent cases 
of AIDS reported in New York 
City show that proportionally 
fewer Gays and more intraven¬ 
ous drug users -are contracting 
the disease. Early last year, 71 
percent of AIDS cases reported 
in NYC involved Gays, while 17 
percent involved intravenous 
drug users, mostly drug addicts 
using contaminated needles. 

Dr. Sencer said last week that 
drug users now accounted for 25 
percent of the New York vic¬ 
tims, while the percentage of 
Gay victims had dropped to 61 
percent. Dr. Sencer attributed 
the shift to more conservative 
sexual life styles of New York 
Gays since AIDS was first re¬ 
ported in 1981, and to the dif¬ 
ficulty of convincing drug users 
of the risk of contracting AIDS 
from contaminated needles. 

Announcements (as they 
come in): The committee for 
Louise Renne is holding a $125 
reception (cocktails and hors 
d’oeuvres) for the supervisor at 
the Vorpal Gallery Nov. 1, 5:30 
to 7:30. • Friends of School 
Board member Dick Cerbatos 
are holding a cocktail party for 
their man on the same date 
(Nov. 1) at the Fay Mansion 
Inn, 834 Grove, from 5:30 to 
7:30 ($25, no-host bar, etc.). 
Friends of Board of Education 
candidate JoAnne Miller are 
holding a “pre-election celebra¬ 
tion” for her at the Elaine Pot¬ 
ter Gallery, 336 Hayes, Nov. 2, 
(5:30-7:30; donors’ choice of $20 
- $5 requested). 

Milk Club members are an¬ 
noyed that the notation on their 
slate card asking specifically 
that voters not vote for Kopp or 
Starr was left off, with the usual 
“oversight” explanation offered. 

■ 

W. Friday 


by Allen White 

If Supervisor Louise Renne could send a message to the 
Lesbians and Gay men who will be voting in two weeks, it 
is that she cares about people and that she is a “cause 
oriented" person. 

She backs her position with her track record as chair of 
the powerful Finance Committee of the Board of Supervisors. 
With the exception of some federal grants, every sing ie dime 
of taxpayers' money spent in San Francisco must pass 
through this committe. Louise Renne is in charge. 


She brings up item after item 
which she has pushed through 
the committee and into final 
passage in the Board of Super¬ 
visors. The Larkin Street Youth 
Center will have funds to stay 
open next year because of her 
work. The theater community 
will stay vibrant because of 
funds she has found to assure 
their physical buildings meet 
safety standards. 

Last week, she found an ad¬ 
ditional $65,000 to meet a finan¬ 
cial need of the Gay-based 
Operation Concern. The Com¬ 
munity United Against Violence 
and the Pride Center will receive 
money in 1985 that Supervisor 
Renne has fought to secure. 

Renne was in the forefront to 
rechannel city money toward 
AIDS. The city of San Fran¬ 
cisco has spent more money on 
AIDS prevention education 
than the federal government. 

The fights of Louise Renne 
would appear to take several 
specific directions. First, she 
and her staff work on the spend¬ 
ing of city money. The money is 
not unlimited. Renne has had to 
fight a war of dollars and cents. 
Who gets what money, who gets 
cut? She has been successful by 
being a negotiator, an accoun¬ 
tant, and a part-time magician. 
The result has been financial 
stability and money to fund 
many programs, many which 
have directly affected the Gay 
community. 

She has fought also to find the 



Louise Renne (Phoi Rink) 


truth. She tells how she gets out 
into the city and works with peo¬ 
ple to find their true needs. 

One of the more recent efforts 
deals with the Larkin Street 
Youth Center. Renne went to 
the Tenderloin and the Polk 
Street areas to persoi ly see the 
problems. What she found were 
homeless youths, many who had 
run away to San Francisco. 

Louise Renne is one of the 
people who chose to make their 
problem her problem. She went 
to the Mayor, she started 
(Continued on page 14) 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 12 













































Starr: Tve Changed 
My Mind on Gays’ 

Anti-Gay Columnist Becomes 
Pro-Gay Candidate for Supe 

by George Mendenhall 

Kevin Starr, who has raised $300,000 in hopes of placing 
himself on the Board of Supervisors Nov. 6, held a reception 
for Lesbian and Gay supporters and the curious on Monday, 
Oct. 22. The primarily \ uppie crowd of 60 professionals and 
conservatives heard Starr deny that he is homophobic. 

The challenger said he made a dramatic change in his 
attitude toward Gay people after he wrote two controversial 
columns in the San Francisco Examiner in 19/8. 


Seeks Election in Her Own Right. Supervisor Willie Kennedy u 
the voters Nov. 6. (Photo: Kink) 


s appointed more than three years ago . and faces 


Willie Kennedy: An 
Ear in City Hall 

She Says She’s Willing to Switch 
When the Facts Support It 

by Allen White 

Supervisor Willie Kennedy is a woman who listens more 
than she lectures. Since her appointment 3Vz years ago to the 
Board of Supervisors, Supervisor Kennedy has been learn¬ 
ing from the people of San Francisco. The lessons can come 
hard, especially from the Gay community. 

Earlier this month she made regional Democratic political 


a firm commitment that she will 
support “domestic partnership’’ 
legislation when it again appears 
before the Board of Supervisors. 
When originally introduced, she 
voted for the legislation, then 
reversed her stand when Mayor 
Feinstein vetoed the measure. 
She was sharply rebuked by the 
Gay community for her reversal. 
Yet, this move became the be¬ 
ginning of a learning process 
and a dialogue with the com¬ 
munity. 

The reasons Supervisor Ken¬ 
nedy will now enthusiastically 
endorse the “domestic partner¬ 
ship’’ bill are symbolic of how 
she has grown and changed in 
her role of San Francisco super¬ 
visor. When the legislation was 
originally presented she had a 
distant relationship with the 
Lesbian and Gay community. 

Following her first vote, 
Black ministers were vocal and 
strong in opposition to the legis¬ 
lation. The Black community 
was her “core” of support and 
the picture they painted caused 
her to change her vote. Several 
other supervisors also switched, 
killing the law. 

Since that time, Supervisor 
Kennedy has not only broad¬ 
ened her relationship with the 
Gay community, she has also 
been building a wide range of 
support throughout the city. 
Listening and responding to the 
diversified communities in the 
city is now starting to pay off. 

She easily won endorsement 
by the Black organizations 
throughout the city. That was to 
be expected. Much more impor¬ 
tant, for it may signal her victory 
in the supervisorial race, are her 
endorsements by so many di¬ 
verse community action political 
groups. 

She now enjoys support from 
Latino clubs, Asian-American 
organizations, and organized 
labor as well as many of the 


clubs. The broad-based coali¬ 
tion extends in the Gay com¬ 
munity with her endorsement by 
the Harvey Milk Lesbian/Gay 
Democratic Club. 

Assemblyman Art Agnos, 
who built a similar type of coali¬ 
tion on a statewide level to push 
AB-1 through the California 
Assembly and Senate, com¬ 
mented on the reasons why he 
believes Kennedy has been suc¬ 
cessful in gaining this coalition 
support. Agnos says it is “be¬ 
cause she is accessible to every¬ 
one, gives everyone a fair hear¬ 
ing, and always acts in the in¬ 
terests of San Francisco as a 
whole.” 

Her willingness to listen and 
be accessible was most dramati¬ 
cally demonstrated during the 
recent battles over rent control. 
Kennedy sits on the committee 
which first had to approve the 
legislation before it was present¬ 
ed to the full board. The day of 
the hearing there were literally 
hundreds of people jamming the 
supervisors’ chambers and fill¬ 
ing the entire main floor of City 
Hall. One supervisor was ab¬ 
sent, leaving a two-person com¬ 
mittee, which constitutes a 
quorum. 

Supervisor Kennedy chose to 
allow every person who had a 
viewpoint to speak. Kennedy 
wanted to listen. The other 
supervisor chose to leave after 
hearing only about half the 
speakers. As the supervisor left, 
thereby leaving the committee 
without a quorum and unable to 
legally function, Willie Kennedy 
let loose a verbal attack 

“Those committee hearings,” 
says Supervisor Kennedy, “are 
the time when the people can 
participate in the process of city 
government. If they will take the 
time to come down to City Hall, 
they must be given the courtesy 
and the right to be heard.” 

I Continued on next page) 



Starr had decried wanton vio¬ 
lence in the city in one column 
and related this to the Gay com¬ 
munity. He wrote in April 1978 
that Assembly Member Willie 
Brown and Supervisor Harvey 
Milk were urging Gay people to 
move to the city “because it 
means more votes.” 

He added, “I abhor the idea 
of turning this city into one big 
bathhouse, Gay or straight. I 
don’t want every creep in the 
country — homosexual, hetero¬ 
sexual, whatever — coming here 
in search of thrills.” He added 
comments about murder, sado¬ 
masochism, and child molesta¬ 
tion as “becoming a way of life” 
here. 

The columnist also wrote that 
Gay activists had no business 
relating the killing of Gay peo¬ 
ple with the Holocaust in Ger¬ 
many. He wrote, “There were 
no bars or bathhouses or Coors 
beer at Dachau. There were no 
drag queen contests at Buchen- 
wald.” 

Starr said the treatment of 
Jews in the Holocaust was “too 


sacred to be so cheaply appro¬ 
priated by every two-bit radical 
Gay spokesman . . .” (The 
Nazis’ own records show that 
tens of thousands of Gays also 
were tortured and executed in 
concentration camps.) 

Several Gay activists say they 
have become convinced since 
these 1978 columns were written 
that there is a “new” Kevin 
Starr, and have endorsed his 
candidacy. These include Police 
Commissioner Jo Daly, long¬ 
time activist Dorr Jones, former 
Bay Area Reporter editor Paul 
Lorch, Gay Catholic activist 
Kevin Gordon, and decorator 
Billy Gaylord. Allan Johnson, 
former City Hall aide, is a Starr 
staff person. 

Starr said there was a dra¬ 
matic change in his life when 
Dan White murdered Harvey 
Milk and George Moscone six 
months after he wrote his con¬ 
troversial columns in 1978. “I 
cannot emphasize enough the ef¬ 
fect their assassination had on 
me. That shoook the holy hell 
(Continued on next page) 


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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 PAGE 13 





















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(Continued from previous page) 

As she wants to listen to the 
people who want to speak, she 
is equally as adamant about 
wanting to be given all the facts 
on issues where she is lobbied for 
support. Those who try and sell 
her an incomplete package do so 
at peril. 

The best example was her 
change from support to opposi¬ 
tion to Proposition 37, the lot- 
1 Jtery issue. On her desk sits a 
w huge folder of information 
which, she says, distorted the 
facts regarding this issue. When 
further, more complete points of 
information were presented to 


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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 14 


her, she assessed the total pic¬ 
ture and announced that she was 
withdrawing her support. 

It is this presentation of all the 
facts by the Gay community re¬ 
garding “domestic partner¬ 
ships” which now has convinced 
her to fight for its passage. The 
next time the legislation , is 
presented before the board, 
Supervisor Kennedy believes it 
will be a better, refined legisla¬ 
tive package. 

“Gay men and Lesbians pay 
taxes,” she said, “and they are 
entitled to the same status as any 
other person.” ■ 

A. White 


Renne Holds City’s Purse-Strings 


(Continued from page 12) 

searching the budget for funds, 
and she was able to make spe¬ 
cific proposals to help solve the 
problems that exist for these 
kids. 

Renne has been equally as 
concerned about the performing 
arts in San Francisco. Through 
the hotel tax fund, the city has 
been supporting theater groups 
for years. The money, though, 
is designated for very specific 
projects. 

Supervisor Renne started to 
realize that on one hand the city 


was giving money to little the¬ 
ater groups and on the other, the 
Fire Department was closing the 
theaters down because they were 
unsafe. Renne found the situ¬ 
ation absurd. She went to work 
and her solution was to push 
through a program that now 
allows theaters in San Francisco 
to borrow money at low interest 
rates to make their properties 
safe. 

In the Gay community, The¬ 
atre Rhinoceros is one of the 
organizations which will benefit 
from the program. Acknowl¬ 
edged as one of the leading 


Kevin Starr: ‘I’m Pro-Cay’ 


(Continued from previous page) 
out of me and began my devel¬ 
opment. I had not always under¬ 
stood and you do not have the 
time for measured judgment 
when you are writing a column 
six days a week. I learned about 
the roundup of homosexuals and 
the pink triangles. They were 
after I wrote those columns.” 

Starr said, “I stand before 
you self-accused of previous er¬ 
rors of fact and charity. Some of 
you went through that and also 
w orked your way out of it . . . 
If you think I am mean and dark 
then go out and campaign 
against me. But I recognized 
shortly after I wrote those col¬ 
umns that I wrote in haste, with 
hate and improper facts. Let us 
talk about the columns I wrote 
later.” 

Starr referred to four later col¬ 
umns — recognizing the rights 
of the Sisters of Perpetual In¬ 
dulgence to satirize the Church, 
praise for a book by a Gay 
author (Playing the Game by 
Roger Austen), and two col¬ 
umns urging support for the 
local Gay Catholic Task Force. 
Kevin Gordon, who headed the 
task force, stood up to say that 
Starr’s columns had consider¬ 
able w eight in helping his group 
receive support and continue its 
work. 

Recognizing some doubts in 
his audience, Starr asked, “Do 
you recall the development of 
your own identity, your own 
sense of self-esteem? If you can 
recall that, imagine what it was 
like for a hulking ethnic from St. 
Ignatius High as he stumbled on 
his journey to understanding. 
We are here together today — 
and that is where I want to be. ” 

The challenger urged that he 


is “not campaigning for votes 
among people who do not like 
the people in this room. I could 
campaign comfortably with 
them but I no longer want that 
kind of support ... I want to 
see an end to stereotyping and 
distrust. I am for assimilation.” 

Starr commented on two con¬ 
troversial issues in the Lesbian 
and Gay community. A question 
from the floor raised the bath¬ 
house issue and Starr was em¬ 
phatic: “It is a very dangerous 
thing to let the government reg¬ 
ulate sexual activity. I am a 
libertarian on this subject. I do 
not support the closing of the 
bathhouses. The spread of 
AIDS will continue whether 
these places are closed or not. 
No business should be closed 
unless it can be totally proven 
that what is happening there is 
endangering public health.” 

On domestic partners, Starr 
said he agreed with the Mayor 
and Supervisor Harry Britt that 
any plan to extend the health 
benefits to the live-in relatives of 
city employees must include 
heterosexuals. He said that he 
would support such a plan. 

Starr said he would like to 
serve on the board’s Planning, 
Housing, and Development 
committee. Such a move would 
be of special interest to single 
Gay people. He said that if 
elected he would oppose adding 
vacancy control to the city’s rent 
control ordinance, as he believes 
such a move would halt the de¬ 
velopment of new housing here. 

The relatively cordial recep¬ 
tion came to life when Gay labor 
activist Howard Wallace con¬ 
fronted Starr. He said, “I see 
nothing that you have done since 
1978 that even remotely com- 


TV Documentary Set on ‘New Right’ 


“Life & Liberty ... For All 
Who Believe,” a 30-minute doc¬ 
umentary produced by People 
For The American Way, will air 
in San Francisco on KBHK at 
10:30 p.m. Oct. 25. 

The documentary, which is 
hosted by Burt Lancaster, ex¬ 
amines the extremism of the 
Fundamentalist Right and, in 


the words of some of the move¬ 
ment’s leaders, focuses on many 
of the movment’s long-term 
goals — especially in the areas 
of public education and national 
politics. 

The film, which was original¬ 
ly released nationally in 1982, is 
being re-released as part of a $1 
million religion and politics 
campaign. 



Willie B. Kennedy (Photo: Rink) 



theater groups in the city, The¬ 
atre Rhinoceros has made a sig¬ 
nificant contribution to the 
theater community. At the same 
time, its smaller studio theater 
does not meet all fire and safety 
standards. Because of Renne’ 
fire-safety loan program, the 
theater property will be able to 
pass all safety standards. 

When the need for AIDS 
funding was presented to the 
board. It was Louise Renne who 
acted as the watchdog on how 
the money was to be allocated. 
She is part of a team of super¬ 
visors who have made San Fran¬ 
cisco the nation’s top-spending 
city in responding to the health 
crisis. ■ 

A. White 


Kevin Starr (Photo: Rink) 


pensates for the ruthless col¬ 
umns you wrote against our 
community. That was while 
(State Senator) Briggs was try¬ 
ing to raise signatures to ban 
Gay teachers. Your columns 
caused considerable pain and 
misery as you pitted Jews 
against Gays and created the im¬ 
pression that we are murderers 
and uncaring people.” 

Starr halted his aide, John¬ 
son, from stopping Wallace 
from speaking but then let 
Johnson himself reply. Clearly 
angered, Johnson moved close 
to Wallace’s face and said, “You 
are the victim of your sexuality. 
I have grown in this community 
as Kevin has. I am sorry you are 
condemning him for something 
he said six years ago. People 
change their minds.” 

Considerable opposition to 
Starr’s candidacy has come from 
within the three Democratic 
clubs in the city. None have en¬ 
dorsed him. The Milk Demo¬ 
cratic Club has specifically 
urged Gay people not to vote for 
him. Not one officer of a Gay 
Democratic club attended the 
Starr reception, although three 
leading Gay Republican activ¬ 
ists attended as observers — 
Duke Armstrong, Kevin Wads¬ 
worth, and Bob Bacci. Also 
observing, but not endorsing, 
was Supervisor Richard Hon- 
gisto. ■ 

G. Mendenhall 





























ON THE JOB: 

GAY PEOPLE AT WORK 


Unionist 


B ill dwell is International 
Vice President of the United 
Food and Commercial 
Workers, which, with 1.3 mil¬ 
lion members, is the largest of all 
unions affiliated with the AFL- 
CIO. He recently attended a 
fundraising dinner in Washing¬ 
ton, D.C., for the Human 
Rights Campaign Fund, a polit¬ 
ical action committee which sup¬ 
ports candidates sympathetic to 
Lesbian/Gay rights. As he took 
his seat at the dinner, the follow¬ 
ing dialogue took place: 

Coors: Well, I guess I’m sit¬ 
ting here. My name is Dallas 
Coors. 

Olwell: Not Coors as in Coors 
beer? 

Coors: Yes, I was born, bred, 
and brewed in Golden, Colo¬ 
rado. 

Olwell: Oh, Mr. Coors, you’re 
not going to want to sit here. 

Coors: I'll be glad to sit here. 
There's only one SOB in the 
joint I don't want to sit next to 
and that's the goddam guy from 
the union. 

Olwell, 49, has been a union 
man for nearly 30 years. He 
knew he was Gay at 14, was 
publicly pushed out of the closet 
at 35, but only in recent years 
has he become widely known as 
a Gay rights activist. 

His genuine commitments to 
both the trade union movement 
and the Gay rights movement 
inevitably have led to grousing 
by those purists among the Les¬ 
bian and Gay leadership who, in 
their zeal, find divided loyalties 
hard to accept. 

“The Gay and Lesbian com¬ 
munity is afraid of compro¬ 
mise,’’ retorts Olwell. “They 
don’t realize that sometimes half 
a loaf is a starting point on which 
to build. I have little patience 
with the great rhetoric that goes 
on in our community, the de¬ 
bates, and the stridency. Labor 
has had to compromise. I’ve 
been through it. I’ve learned 
how to do it. I’m not afraid of 
a compromise.’’ 

Olwell’s family background 
was not only non-union, it was 
decidedly anti-union. His 
grandfather owned a small coal 
mine in the state of Washington. 
When the mine workers’ union 
organized his employees in the 
late 1920s, he flooded the mine 
rather than deal with the union. 
The mine never opened again. 

He worked his way through 
school, holding down a job in a 
grocery store. When the store 
was unionized, he joined and 
became fascinated with the 
operations of the union. 

As a result, he changed his 
major at college to labor rela¬ 
tions. He completed his degree 
in 1959 after which he secured 
a job as a buiness agent for a 
local union. 

By 1967 he had become Presi¬ 
dent of the local, which, through 
a series of mergers, had become 
one of the largest locals in the 
country, with membership at the 
time of some 11,000. 

I n 1970, in a bitterly fought 
election for the presidency of 
Seattle’s Labor Council, Ol¬ 
well’s closet w as blasted open by 
his opponent for the office, who 
made public remarks on the sub¬ 
ject of his sexuality. Olwell won 
the election with an overwhelm¬ 
ing majority. 

He remembers the experience 
of being openly attacked for his 
private preferences as a most 
painful one, but he recognizes 


ARTHUR LAZERE. C PA. 

that it was useful in nudging him 
into dealing with the issue. 

He started taking his lover to 
official functions. He began 
talking about Gay issues. Even¬ 
tually, he helped raise money for 
the Seattle Lesbian and Gay 
community’s successful fight to 
retain the city’s Gay rights laws. 

In 1972 Olwell was elected In¬ 
ternational Vice President of his 
union, at age 37 one of the 
youngest ever to achieve that 
rank. In 1978 he relocated to 
Washington, D.C., to take up 
the function of Director of Pub¬ 
lic Affairs and Communica¬ 
tions, the slot he holds today. 

With some 45 staff people 
under his supervision, Olwell 
has responsibility for all of his 
union’s publications, research, 
and education. He conducts the 
union’s lobbying efforts, both 
legislative and administrative. 

The latter effort, of course, in¬ 
cludes maintaining the union’s 
relationships with the Demo¬ 
cratic and Republican parties. 
Congress, and the White House. 
When Olwell refers to “Fritz,” 
it is not pretension, but a genu¬ 
ine indication of his friendship 
with the presidential candidate, 
cultivated over his years in the 
Washington political arena. He 
is also close to Lane Kirkland, 
President of the AFL-CIO. 

With friends in high places, 
Olwell has been able to produce 
some concrete results for the 
Lesbian and Gay communitv. 
He lobbied for the AFL-CIO 
resolution passed in October 
1983 which supported Gay 
rights legislation as “consistent 
with the principles of trade 
unionism and a person’s right to 
privacy.” 

H e was instrumental in gain¬ 
ing admission for both the Gay 
Rights National Lobby and the 
National Gay Task Force into 
the influential Leadership Con¬ 
ference for Civil Rights. With 
Dan Bradley, he secured Mon¬ 
dale as the keynote speaker at a 
New York Human Rights Cam¬ 
paign Fund dinner. 

He played an important role 
in the formation of the Lesbian/ 
Gay caucus of the Democratic 
Party and in obtaining party 
recognition of the caucus. He 
has provided assistance to the 
hospice for people with AIDS in 
Washington. 

Olwell was a principal speak¬ 
er at the National March for 
Lesbian/Gay Rights in San 
Francisco, and has spoken to the 
National Association of Busi¬ 
ness Councils in Washington. 
To date, he has not taken any 
formal positions with Gay or¬ 
ganizations because, he says, of 
the heavy demands of his job. 
But he appears to have accom¬ 
plished more than many who 
have held such positions. 

“I am not a front office Gay 
person ... At the union I have 
a line position. I have paid a 
very dear price for what I am do¬ 
ing on Gay issues. I would pay 
it ten times over, because I think 
it is incredibly important that 
we, as Gay and Lesbian people, 
have role models, people who 
are successful and sit in seats of 
power and make a difference. 
We can show to the rest of the 
community that we are the same 
as they are, that we’ve got the 
same strengths and weaknesses 
as society as a whole.” 

hile welcoming the AFL- 
CIO resolution supporting 
Gay rights legislation, 
some community activists have 
been critical that AFL-CIO pol¬ 



icy does not extend to making 
sexual preference nondiscrimi¬ 
nation clauses one of the de¬ 
mands in negotiating union con¬ 
tracts. 

Olwell’s response: “There is a 
dramatic misconception on that. 
It drives me up a wall. Most 
contracts now say that no one 
can be discharged or disciplined 
except for just cause. Period. 

“The minute you start to 
moderate or to put parameters 
or to expand on that^you limit 
the broadest form of protection 
that workers have,’ Olwell said. 

On the issue of domestic part¬ 
ners’ benefits, Olwell said, “It is 
a tremendously complex and 
difficult question with large, 
large dollar values attached to it. 
The economy is going to have to 
change before we have the lux¬ 
ury of .extra money to take care 
of domestic partners’ benefits. 

“My own lover of 17 years is 
not covered by my pension 
plan,” Olwell said. “I am work¬ 
ing day and night to get that 
changed. It is a terrible thing to 
think that after 17 years with my 
lover, if I die, he’ll get absolutely 
nothing from my pension plan. 
I’m trying to change it, but I 
don’t know whether I can get it 
done or not. I think we’re going 
to have to have a law which 
legalizes same-sex marriages in 
the United States.” 

Olwell sees many parallels be¬ 
tween the union movement and 
the Gay movement. He would 
like to see the techniques which 
he has learned for organizing 
and mobilizing labor be applied 
to the Lesbian and Gay commu¬ 
nity. He offers assurance that 
major people in the labor move¬ 
ment will step forward to speak 
to the Lesbian and Gay commu¬ 
nity on the subject of labor's 
commitment to nondiscrimina¬ 
tion on the basis of sexual 
orientation. 


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CANDIDATES WHO 
ENDORSE PROP. 36 




SAVE 13 


VOTE “YES” ON PROP. 36 


.□ The Gay Community in 1978 gave strong voter support to Prop¬ 
osition 13. 

□ This year, Howard Jarvis is showing us his appreciation, has 
recently rejected supporting an anti-gay ballot initiative and has 
publicly endorsed our community candidates who favor lower 
taxes. 

□ Let’s now show Howard our appreciation by voting yes on 
Proposition 36. 

PROPOSITION 36 WILL: 

^ Close the loopholes of Proposition 13. 

Refund money to all property owners who were unfairly taxed. “When 
government takes money that doesn’t belong to it. the money should be 
returned.” 

protect renters against increases in the taxes they pay: income, sales, 
gasoline, and rental owner “fees." 

^ not help big corporations. California's biggest corporations opposed 13 
and now 36. “They want to control your tax dollar and don’t want want you 
voting on tax increases." 

^ not help politicians. Most politicians opposed 13 and now 36, with scare 
tactics. “They want to control your tax dollar and don’t want you voting on tax 
•increases.” 

'V v v 


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for individual rights and 
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Return the power to the 
people. Let people, not 
politicians and corpora¬ 
tions, control your tax 
dollar. Vote yes on 36, and 
support Howard Jarvis, a 
man of the people. 



BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 PAGE 15 

























New Year Brewing 
For Gay Witches 

The Ways of the Old Religion 
Touch All on Halloween 

by Van Ault 

F or many Gay people, Halloween is one of the most dra¬ 
matic, exciting times of the year. Halloween is the oppor¬ 
tunity to cast off the staid, stiff behav ior of our mundane 
world, and a chance to step into the sensually enriching world 
ol fantasy. This holiday is regarded as a special time of 
psychic freedom and experimentation. 


The mystique of Halloween 
has its roots in pagan culture, 
and in contemporary Witchcraft 
is still regarded as one of the 
four greater Sabbats. Actually 
known as Samhain (pronounced 
sow-an), this festival marks the 
end of the' Celtic Harvest* and 
the turning of the wheel of life 
towards winter. It is the Witch¬ 
es’ new year celebration. 

On Samhain, it is said that the 
veils between life and death are 
very thin, and we can communi¬ 
cate with our beloved ones who 
are no longer living, if they wish 
it. 

While we Witches use this oc¬ 
casion to reflect upon the past, 
and prepare ourselves for the 
seasonal change, it is, in the 
broadest sense, a day to intense¬ 
ly affirm the power of the life 


force which animates us. This is 
intuitively understood by many 
who are not Witches. The 
revelry that occurs in the Gay 
community is very indicative of 
this affirmation. 

For those, like mvself, who 
are Gay and practioners of the 
Old Religion, there is even more 
richness and excitement, and it 
is experienced year ’round, and 
not just at Samhain. 

What attracts Gay men to 
Witchcraft? Finding our way 
through the sexual labyrinth to 
places of power and ecstatic 
realization can be almost a spiri¬ 
tual experience. In the Craft, 
this primal connection with our 
deeper self, acted out on the sex¬ 
ual playground, is magnified 
enormously. 


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The Witch Goddess 


The Witch God 


Through the powers of con¬ 
centration and the directing 
force of the will, sexuality be¬ 
comes another aspect of divinity 
made manifest, and, like rocket 
boosters, can jettison us into 
realms of awareness which ordi¬ 
nary folks cannot access. 

W itches use magic, some¬ 
times defined as the “art 
of changing consciousness 
at will,” to shape and mold the 
world around us so it reflects our 
desires more clearly. It is also 
the power to transform ourselves 
into what we will — and to avoid 
being transformed by the world 
around us into what we do not 
will. 

It requires the skills of dis¬ 
crimination and careful choice. 
While we simply call this art 
“magic,” the techniques found 
therein have been adapted into 
many different approaches to 
personal growth, and are often 
known as meditation, visualiza¬ 
tion, hypnosis, ritual, and mani¬ 
festation. 

First and foremost is the vi¬ 
sion of the imminent life force as 
the Goddess — the Great Moth¬ 
er who gives us birth and to 
whose infinite grace we return at 
death, until we reincarnate 
again. Her power is witnessed in 
the cycles of the seasons, in the 
phases of the moon. 

She is the creator, as well as 
destroyer, and it is through her 
expansiveness that we can un¬ 
derstand how to walk the deli¬ 
cate balance between life and 
death. She teaches us why we 
cannot have one without the 
other, for without death, there 
can be no life. The feminine 
aspect of the divine empowers 
Gay men to master the healing, 
creative, nurturing, and life- 
giving principles of our own 
beings. 

The masculine side of the 
divine force is the Horned God, 
often viewed as Pan, or Cernun- 
nos. He is the force of primal 
sexuality itself, and is visually 
represented with the horns or 
antlers of the stag, the hooves of 
a goat, as well as a prominent 
and erect penis. How can you 
help but love a deity who has 
had a hard-on for thousands of 


years? 

In Witchcraft, we regard sex 
as a sacred act, rather than 
something that is sinful, im¬ 
moral, or questionable. The 
God is the lord of animals, and 
the ruler of the realms of death 
— our own animal nature un¬ 
tamed by conventions and fool¬ 
ish traditions. 

The Christian Church, when 
it sought to destroy the pagan 
ways, twisted the imagery of the 
God into their devil, Satan. To 
Witches, the idea of a devil is 
ludicrous and serves only as a 
metaphor for human ignorance 
and fear. 

The God is kind and compas¬ 
sionate, and yet he dances his 
part in the spiral of life with 
playfulness, a kind of rambunc¬ 
tious seductiveness that is exhil¬ 
arating to experience. His force 
in nature is observed in the solar 
holidays (the solstices and equi¬ 
noxes). 

He is the growing grain, the 
ripened fruit. At the harvest, he 
is cut down, and returns on 
Samhain to the underworld 
where he waits to be bom again 
through the Goddess on the 
Winter Solstice, as the sun child. 

Like the shamans of old, some 
Gay men relate to this aspect of 
divine power through the wear¬ 
ing of animal skins — leather. 
The sense of earthiness, primal 
energy, which comes through 
that expression shifts conscious¬ 
ness, at times, over into a more 
magical, and richly creative ex- 

G ay Witches are free to draw 
upon any aspect of God or 
Goddess they desire, and 
through that, can evoke out of 
their moment-to-moment expe¬ 
rience effects which serve them¬ 
selves and those they love. The 
power of the Goddess, the all- 
seeing, all-knowing, benevolent 
mother, may be of assistance in 
the healing and transformation 
of pain, anger or sickness. 

The strength of the God may 
bring assertiveness, masculine 
strength, and logical growth into 
the life of one who is frustrated 
and lost. The balance of the God 
and Goddess in consciousness 
reveals the true androgyny and 


flexibility of the human identity. 

Unlike many of our Christian 
friends, Gay Witches seldom 
worry whether their sexuality is 
accepted by the conventional 
clergy, bishops, popes, or other 
supposed “authorities” — ex¬ 
cept, perhaps, where inquisi¬ 
tions and religious persecutions 
arise. The Witch is his or her 
own Priest — and answers to no 
one’s authority except that of his 
or her own Gods. 

The Witch understands sexu¬ 
ality as a divine gift, through 
which love and connectedness, 
sensual pleasure, and ecstasy are 
revealed. Witches are fiercely in¬ 
dependent, not given to the “fol¬ 
low the leader” type of religion 
that is often observed in the 
manipulative cults of today. We 
are a faith of leaders, and we do 
not need followers, or to pros¬ 
elytize. 

Witchcraft is lived as a path 
of joy, as an art of power, or 
perhaps best viewed as life as an 
art form. The power which 
comes to the practitioner is ac¬ 
quired through diligent practice, 
discipline, ethical exploration, 
and rigorous training. 

It is not easy to become a 
Witch. Caution and sound judg¬ 
ment must prevail when magical 
power is exercised — and Witch¬ 
es have a firm belief that “what 
you send out returns to you 
threefold.” 

Much of the Craft is simply 
common sense. There is a pleth¬ 
ora of useful, practical informa¬ 
tion on how to stay healthy, how 
to purge ourselves of needless 
guilt, anger, or fear, and how to 
set in motion positive things for 
ourselves and our community. 

Initiation into the Craft of the 
Wise is, for some Gay men, very 
much like a second coming out. 
To get there, we must confront 
“the guardian on the threshold” 
— that deeply ingrained pro¬ 
gramming that tells us we must 
be victims — helpless and pow¬ 
erless forever. 

When we overcome that 
block, and dare to say “yes” to 
the swirling, pulsing powers of 
the psyche, our lives take on new 
dimensions. And when we make 
our position known to others, we 
jokingly refer to it as “coming 
out of the broomcloset. ” 

In some shamanistic cultures, 
Gay people have been revered 
and looked upon as special mag¬ 
ical gifts to the community at 
large. We were often the healers, 
priests, medicine men, or sages 
who served others. To be Gay is 
to develop special sensitivities, 
which, when rightly harnessed, 
can open new levels of percep¬ 
tion. To be Gay and a Witch, 
then, is to consciously plug into 
that ability. It changes one dra¬ 
matically, and enriches the 
experience. 

That richness will be seen 
during Halloween. On Samhain, 
the wheel of life turns again, a 
new year is born. We celebrate 
the change with our own stun¬ 
ning pageantry and creative fun, 
even if we don’t recognize the 
“spiritual” or “religious” rami¬ 
fications. 

Deep down, we all know it’s 
very, very special. Whether 
you’re a Witch or not, you can 
still feel the special energy and 
ethos of this Sabbat. The bar¬ 
riers between the mundane and 
the magical fall, and we become, 
even if just for an evening, more 
empowered beings. The way of 
the Witch takes that kind of ex¬ 
perience and magnifies it a hun¬ 
dredfold, year ’round! ■ 

V. Ault 

Recommended reading: The Spiral 
Dance by Starhawk, Drawing Down 
The Moon by Margo Adler, Witch¬ 
craft And The Gay Counterculture by 
Arthur Evans. 

Van Ault is a professional psy¬ 
chic, a teacher of Witchcraft, and 
publisher of Cemunnos News, a 
periodical for Bay Area Witches. 


BAY AREA REPORTER (DCTOBER 25 , 1984 PAGE 1 6 





































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The audience at last Sunday 
night’s ball had, for the most 
part, paid $30 a ticket to sit at 
a table and be dazzled by spec¬ 
tacular costumes and the cre¬ 
ativity for which San Francisco’s 
Gay community is famous. 

The contestants prepare, 
sometimes for months, for the 
moment when they will make 
their grand entrance. In the past 
years there has been special 
music tracks, special lighting, 
and magnificent spectacle. 
Presentations would be staged, 
choreographed, and planned to 
dazzle. 


the evening. As the contest came 
to its conclusion, embarrassed 
and bewildered Tavern Guild 
officers were unable to find out 
the winners. 

In the single male category, 
all the prizes were awarded but 
not one contestant went on stage 
to accept their award and their 
money. The female single cate¬ 
gory first prize was given to the 
wrong person and had to be 
exchanged. 

Said Jo-Jo of San Jose, win¬ 
ner in the female attire category, 
“I call myself the unknown win¬ 
ner. It was really a mess. I didn’t 
even get my final walk down the 
ramp, and that was a big reason 
why I did the thing.” 

A mix-up of contestants’ 
numbers resulted in number 3 
getting the prize awarded to 
number 10, Jo-Jo. The mix-up 
was righted before the ball end¬ 
ed. As disappointing as the 
snafu was for Jo-Jo, he had sym¬ 
pathy for number 3. “I feel sorry 
for the fellow,” he said. 

Officals of the San Francisco 
Tavern Guild were not only dis¬ 
gusted with the presentation, 
they were faced with the real 
problem of a substantial finan¬ 
cial loss. When all the bills are 
tallied, the show is going to lose 
money. 

Many knowledgeable observ¬ 
ers speculated the amount would 
(Continued on next page) 


In return, the contestants 
would vie for as much as $5,000 
in prizes. For many, to enter the 
Beaux Arts Ball was not only a 
creative challenge but also a 
gamble that their entry might be 
the one that gave them the op¬ 
portunity to go home several 
thousand dollars richer. 


It Takes Teamwork. The winning group, backstage, getting it together 
for their grand entrance. (Photo: Rink) 


Beaux Arte Ball 
A Real Big Bomb 


Halloween 

Film Sale! 


by Allen White 


The Beaux Arts Ball is usually an explosion of color and 
costume. This year, it was a bomb — Hiroshima sized. The 
22nd annual Beaux Arts Ball was presented Sunday night at 
the Galleria. The producers failed as they attempted to dis¬ 
card two decades of tradition. 


This was to be the year that 
the Beaux Arts Ball was brought 
into the ’80s. Twenty years is a 
long time, and the decision to ig¬ 
nore the experience of the past 
only provided an opportunity for 
a small number of professionals 
to be engulfed by a production 
team which was simply not pre¬ 
pared for the height of spectacle 
and glamour in San Francisco’s 
Gay community. 

The event drew a crowd 
estimated at about 700 people, 
making it the smallest turnout in 
the history of the event. One 
reason was the price, a stiff $30 
for the main floor seats and $20 
for general admission. 

The show was flanked by 
staggering competition. Jose 
Sarria, who ironically started it 
all, was performing at the 
Valencia Rose. The Eagle was 
winding up an afternoon of a 
huge AIDS benefit with their 
“Search for a Daddy’s Boy Con¬ 
test.” Politically there was the 
presidential debates. To further 
diminish the crowd, the event 
was presented on a Sunday night 
— rather than Saturday night — 
more than a week and a half 
before Halloween — a week 
earlier than usual. 


Those who did attend last 
Sunday were given, not the 
Beaux Arts Ball, but a bad imi¬ 
tation of Conceptual Entertain¬ 
ment's annual Halloween party. 
The difference between the two 
events is experience and the 
ability to deliver what the audi¬ 
ence pays to see. 

The contestants were hustled 
on and off the stage without in¬ 
troduction and without any 
planned staging. All of the con¬ 
testants in all the categories were 
run down the ramp like cattle in 
a Kansas City stockyard, in less 
than one hour. It was an insult 
to the contestants. 

Because of the speed of the 
contest, the judging caught the 
contestants off guard. The pre¬ 
sentation of the money to the 
winners is usually a high spot in 


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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 17 























Beaux Ms Ball A Bomb 



It’s the Headgear! Luckily, ail the lightning at the Beaux Arts Ball teas 
in the outfits . saving this contestant from a shocking finish. (Photo: R. Pruzan) 



(Continued from previous page) 
run into the thousands of 
dollars. The real tragedy is that 
the Beaux Arts Ball is presented 
primarily as a fundraising effort 
of the San Francisco Tavern 
Guild Foundation. 

In San Francisco there is a 
public health organization serv¬ 
ing the Gay community called 
Operation Concern. Operation 
Concern simply would not exist 
if it had not been for the profits 
over many years from the ball. 

In spite of the failure of the 
show to succeed on many tradi¬ 
tional levels, there were awards 
and there were many gorgeous 
and creative entries. There were 
three prizes available in each 
category. The first prize winner 
in the group category was Ed 
McMillan and his friends, who 
picked up $1,000 for their 
“Dragon Slayer'' creation. 

The winner in the single male 
category was Joe Atkins, who 
received $350. Max Schultz 
picked up the $500 check for 
best couple. The best female en¬ 
trant was Jo-Jo, who also won 
$350. ^ 

A. White 



It ’s the Legs! The runs were on the runway at the Beaux Arts Ball a 
gratefully, not in the nylons. (Photo: R. Pruzan) 



Shake It ’Til Ya Break It. Halloween hoofing on the dance floor of the Galleria for the Beaux Arts Ball. (Photo: Rink) 


. . . And the W inner is .. . the lovely peacock at left, Jo-Jo, being con¬ 
gratulated by his mother. That s his brother at right. Jo-Jo won best female 
costume. (Photo: Rink) 




>/ 


A Stunning Effect, and he’s not wearing a costume. Well, would you? 
(Photo: Rink) 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 


PAGE 18 














CUAV 


Avoiding Violence 
On Halloween 


WT pon telling Rotea Guilford, 

I Deputy Mayor of San Fran- 

U cisco and quite a jokester in 

his own right, that I am dying 
my hair blue for Halloween, I 
got the response, “Well, just 
don’t let me see it! ” So it will be 
that temporary spray stuff that 
creates blue puffs of dust when 
you pat it, or maybe — just 
maybe — it’ll be real; real blue 
hair, just like my Aunt Regina 
and the rest of the ladies from 
Orinda! 

Halloween is special because 
you can choose who you are to 
be. Fantasies go wild. Even the 
most conservative financial dis¬ 
trict clones are tempted to get 
beyond their yuppie exterior to 
blossom into that fantasy of 
Marilyn Monroe that seems to 
be suppressed the other 364 days 
of the year. 

Walgreen’s never knew when 
they took over the old Star 
Pharm that their largest sales 
week would be around Hallow¬ 
een — in stockings alone! (Safe¬ 
ty Tip #1: Play like a secretary 
— on your way home Hallow¬ 
een night, off with the pumps 
and on with the Adidas in case 
you find yourself needing to 
run.) 

My friend, politico Dennis 
Collins, wakes up every morn¬ 
ing, saunters upstairs in his box¬ 
ers and with cup of coffee in 
hand begins making campaign 
calls from his kitchen. On Hal¬ 
loween he’s gonna wake up and 
put on a suit and tie! Just as this 
thought threatens my image of 
the Dennis I know and love, our 
fantasies-come-real threaten 
straight society around us. 

I’ll get over Dennis’ suit just 
as Rotea Guilford will look the 
other way when he sees blue. 

When CUAV speakers go into 
Bay Area high schools to talk 
about being Gay and about 
violence, they explain that we 
are bashed because our sexuality 
threatens what attackers consid¬ 
er to be the norm. On Hallow¬ 
een, the bashers appear to come 
out in droves and are doubly 
threatened by who we are. 

By now we know their tricks. 
They come dressed in costumes 
that subtly change their weap¬ 
ons. Attackers dress as baseball 
players carrying bats, as golfers 
carrying clubs, and as the elder¬ 
ly with canes. Some bury then- 
weapons (knives, guns, etc.) 
deep into costume pockets. 
(Safety Tip #2: If you see a 
weapon on Halloween, tell a 
CUAV monitor or the police.) 

The psychology of a basher 
generally is that they don t see 
Gay people as real human be¬ 
ings — they don’t know us and 
are able to objectify us. On 
Halloween their objectification 
is heightened, as they can’t un¬ 
derstand that our freedom 
centers on our ability to be who 
we are in the way that we 


choose. On Halloween even 
those Gay people in the closet 
often choose to come out for a 
taste of freedom. 

W hile it might be our natural 
inclination to choose cos¬ 
tumes on the basis of how 
tight the skirts can be without 
splitting, or which brand of 
nylons is least likely to run, a few 
thoughts on safety might make 
our fantasies a night of fun for 
the nostalgia books. (Safety Tip 
#3: Choose a costume that will 


allow you to move quickly if 
you need to.) 

Some other Halloween Safety 
Strategies: 

• Safety Tip #4: Watch out 
for pickpockets and carry a 
dummy wallet with at least 
enough cash for a cab. 

• Safety Tip #5: If you’re 
gonna party heavy, plan your 
way home ahead of time. 
Know the bus route closest to 
home, take a cab, or figure 
out how to assure a parking 
place near your front door. 
Ask the bartender to help you 


D. Christensen 

call a cab. 

• Safety Tip ft 6: Know your 
supplier of “chemicals.' Not 
all products are as they have 
been advertised. 

• Safety Tip #7: Avoid 
walking alone. Travel in a’ 
group or with friends. 

• Safety Tip #8: Carry a 
whistle and keep it in your 
hand on the way home. 

If you’d like to help CUAV 
with Halloween monitoring on 
Castro Street, call Suzanne at 
864-3112 — 200 monitors are 
needed! B 


GLAS Sponsors 
Halloween Ball at 
Stanford Firehouse 

The Gay and Lesbian Alli¬ 
ance at Stanford (GLAS) will be 
sponsoring a Halloween Ball on 
Saturday, Oct. 27, beginning at 
8:30 p.m., in the Old Firehouse 
on Santa Teresa Street, near 
Tresidder Union on the Stanford 
campus. Refreshments will be 
available. A $2.50 donation will 
be requested at the door to help 
cover expenses. 

For more information, call 
the GLAS events tape at (415) 
497-1488. ■ 


Bay Hotline 


This month marks the sixth 
year Gay Youth Community 
Switchboard has maintained 
operation to Northern Califor¬ 
nians. This Switchboard offers 
the first, and only, youth-for- 
youth community switchboard, 
thus challenging the needs and 
confronting the issues young 
Gays of today face. 

Correspondence may be sent 
to Gay Youth Community 
Switchboard, P.O. Box 846, 
San Francisco, CA 94101, or 
call (415) 552-6025. ■ 


A Special Gift for Him! 

Now at Jefco's Low distributor Prices. 


Jefco Price 
$ 399 . 


Ref. Price $340. 
Jefco Price 
$229. 


Ref. Price $216.50 
Jefco Price 
$129.95 


V- 




Ref. 
Price 
$135. 

Jefco 
Price 
f $87.90 




jefco Price 
$549. 


Ref. Price $1,475. 
Jefco Price 
$ 889 . 


We Wrote the book on Savings! 

JEFCO, the source. 

Jefco Jewelry Distributors, Inc. 

138 California St. (at Front) 

San Francisco, CA 94111 (415) 397-1232 


Mon-Fri 9:30am-5:30 pm. Sat 10am-4pm 


determination of comparable prices for similar mechandiseappears_ 


Master Charge and Visa Cards Accepted 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 19 















G 


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s 


The most cost-effective 
Cay advertising medium in the region: 

The Bay Area Reporter 861-5019. 


Need a Gay Doctor 
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SUNDAY SHOWCASE 

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It's lighter, brighter, and our 
food is better than ever. 

Our newly remodeled res¬ 
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week. Dinners include our 
popular steaks and chops, 


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Just a little bit hungry? 
Our lunch menu — featuring 
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2 for 1 dinners Mon. to Thurs. with this ad (less expensive entree is free) 



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Pacific Center for Human Growth, seen here at 1984 East Bay Gay Day, 
will be promoting AIDS Awareness Week. (Photo: Rink) 

AIDS Epidemic Grows 
In Alameda County 

Cases Up, Awareness Down — 
‘AIDS Week'Focuses Attention 

by Charles Linebarger 

The Alameda County Board of Supervisors has responded 
to a call by the Pacific Center by declaring Nov. 9-16 AIDS 
Awareness Week. At the same time it was announced, at a 
press conference called by the Pacific Center Oct. 16, that 
the state has approved a supplementary grant of from $10,000 
to $15,000 for the Center's educational and counseling 
services. 


The action by the Alameda 
Board of Supervisors was 
prompted not only by the Pacific 
Center but also by recent statis¬ 
tics on the incidence of cases of 
AIDS in the county. The county 
communicable disease officer in 
a letter to the Board of Super¬ 
visors wrote that ^Alameda 
County, which now counts 80 
cases of AIDS, is at the same 
point in the epidemic curve 
where San Francisco was two 
years ago. If Alameda County 
were ranked among the states, 
the county would rank 11th in 
total number of cases. 

The Pacific Center plans a 
full schedule for AIDS Aware¬ 
ness Week with the emphasis on 
increasing AIDS client support, 
public education, and volunteer 
recruitment and training. And 
according to Jeremy Lhndau, 
AIDS Project Coordinator for 
the Pacific Center, “We plan to 
provide four major educational 
events and have over 40 volun¬ 
teers to meet the needs of the 
AIDS epidemic by the con¬ 
clusion of AIDS Awareness 
Week.” 

The educational forums 
planned include a “Forum on 
AIDS for Third World/People 
of Color” on Monday, Nov. 12, 
at 7:30 p.m. at Bella Napoli, 
24th Street and Telegraph in 
Oakland. “A Forum on AIDS 
for Safe Sex and Risk Reduc¬ 
tion” is set for Tuesday, Nov. 
13, at 8 p.m. at The Steam- 
works, 2107 Fourth Street in 
Berkeley. “Community Forum 
on AIDS” is scheduled for 
Wednesday, Nov. 14, at 
10 a.m. and again at 2 p.m. on 
the UC Berkeley campus (call 
for location). And “Coming Out 
in an Age of AIDS” will be pre¬ 


sented Thursday, Nov. 15, at 
7 p.m. at the Hayward Public 
Library, 835 “C” Street (at Mis¬ 
sion) in Hayward. 

“Alameda County ranks third 
in the state in terms of number 
of AIDS deaths,” according to 
Landau. “Approximately 45 
percent of the individuals who 
have contracted AIDS in the 
county have died of the disease. ” 

Things which differentiate 
Alameda County AIDS cases 
from those across the bay in San 


Francisco are the higher ratio of 
individuals who are people of 
color who have contracted the 
disease, the higher mortality 
rate, and the lower level of ser¬ 
vices offered in the East Bay 
county to AIDS patients. Jon 
Peterson, the AIDS Project’s 
Education Assistant, added that 
fully 30 to 35 percent of the cases 
of AIDS in the county are peo¬ 
ple from the Third World or 
people of color. 

“A lot of people in places like 
Castro Valley think they are iso¬ 
lated from AIDS,” John Du¬ 
pree, the Project’s Education 
Coordinator, said. “But people 
in cities like Martinez are getting 
the disease.” 

Audrey Martin, the Project’s 
Client Advocate, spoke up on 
the position of women in the 
AIDS, health crises. Martin 
pointed out that the number of 
women with AIDS is increasing 
all the time, and that among 
women, Third World people 
and people of color make up 50 
percent of the cases. 

Landau finished the press 
conference by pointing up the 
need for AIDS Awareness 
Week. “Gay people in this city 
(Oakland) still aren’t aware that 
AIDS is a problem here,” Lan¬ 
dau said. He added that the 
switchboard will be answering 
questions having to do with 
AIDS and the new discoveries 
about the disease that are being 
covered in the media and caus¬ 
ing some confusion with the 
public. 

The switchboard will be offer¬ 
ing the latest information on the 
possible presence of the AIDS 
virus in saliva and what all the 
talk about the discovery of the 
AIDS virus means in terms of 
conquering the disease. 

The Pacific Center is now 
looking for volunteers to work in 
its expanding AIDS Project. 
The Center hopes to have over 
40 volunteers to work with its 
AIDS clients and AIDS-related 
clients by the end of AIDS 
Awareness Week. Anyone inter¬ 
ested in working as a volunteer 
with the Project should contact 
the Pacific Center at 841-6224. 
The Center would like more 
people of color or who speak 
Spanish to volunteer their ser¬ 
vices to the project. ■ 


Sonoma AIDS Project Recruiting 
Volunteers lor Counseling, Support 


With the number of AIDS 
eases being treated in Sonoma 
County increasing, The Sonoma 
County AIDS Project is recruit¬ 
ing volunteers to counsel and 
provide support for those resi¬ 
dents diagnosed with this life- 
threatening illness. 

Volunteers will participate in 
a two-weekend training pro¬ 
gram based on the training 
model developed by the San 
Francisco Shanti Project. Steve 
Gomes, a Licensed Clinical 
Social Worker, is heading the 
training staff. The training will 
take place on the weekends of 
Nov. 10-11 and 17-18. Those 
wishing to take the training must 
fill out a lengthy application and 
be interviewed by a member of 
the training staff. 

In San Francisco the Shanti 
volunteers are equally divided 
between men and women. Both 
Gays and non-Gays participate 
in the training and in the pro¬ 


viding of services. The same pat¬ 
tern for volunteers is anticipated 
in Sonoma County. Funding for 
the training is being provided by 
the California State Department 
of Health through the River 
Community Service agency in 
Guerneville. Applications are 
available at this agency. They 
will be sent to interested volun¬ 
teers who call the AIDS Hotline, 
579-AIDS. Volunteers will be 
asked for a $50 donation to cover 
a part of the cost of room and 
board for the residential train¬ 
ing program. Scholarships are 
available for people with low 
and moderate incomes. 

The first training program 
will include approximately 20 
volunteers, 5 staff members, and 
8 to 10 consultants. It will begin 
on Saturday morning and con¬ 
clude in the late afternoon on 
Sunday. Currently there are 
about 30 AIDS patients being 
treated in the county. ■ 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 20 










































OAKLAND 


Royal Summit: 
Meet the Monarchs 


PULCHRITUDINOUS 

MUMSY! 

(A Lovely Nose?/ 

The Lovely Little Mother’s 
“Evening of Auction and Enter¬ 
tainment” at the Bench & Bar 
on Sunday, Oct. 14, decidedly 
proved several things. 

First: That auction was un¬ 
equivocally her and Ed 
Paulson’s last roup for this year. 
(They are exculpably tired.) 

Second: Drag pantomine 
won’t be extended the courtesy 
of a respectful death, and keeps 
returning whether it’s wanted or 
not. (This particular entertain¬ 
ment segment, however, was 
just a cantle better than the 
customary amphigory.) 

Third: Lengthly, drawn-out 
cants aren’t necessary in raising 
“hella” bucks. (Even Little 
Mother was surprised at the 
final amount.) 

Fourth: Mr. Gay Alameda 
County, Joe, doesn’t seem to ap¬ 
preciate that his elected position 
entails some responsibility and 
work. (He refused to sell raffle 
tickets in Hayward because his 
name wasn’t on the flyer. When 
it was pointed out that, indeed, 
his name was on the advertise¬ 
ment, he still refused to sell 
tickets.) 

Fifth: If the right combina¬ 
tion of people and merchandise 
are juxtaposed, not much pala¬ 
vering is needed to produce a 
substantial final figure. (Some of 
the items were started for bid¬ 
ding at $100.) 

Sixth: Even with the house 
lights out, the disco lights on — 
including that irritating mir¬ 
rored ball — and the danseuses 
gamboling, the two in charge of 
the finances and bookkeeping 
managed (thanks to the candle 
from Taco Tony) to conclude 
the necessary paperwork and 
return home at a decent hour. 

To not acknowledge the 
entertainers would be a remiss 
of duty. Lady Fuji did Diana 
Ross doing Billie Holiday; Lady 
Johnny and troupe did Man¬ 
hattan Transfer doing Tuxedo 
Junction; Lady Cathy (still my 
favorite) did Julie Andrews do¬ 
ing Jazz Hot Lady; Nova did 
Julie Andrews doing Thorough¬ 
ly Modern Millie; Ian was 
himself and played his guitar 
and sang; Camille did Dionne 
Warwick. A lot of the hornora- 
ria was donated back to the cof¬ 
fers of the auction. That’s nice. 

The financial breakdown of 
this auction resulted thusly: 
Auction kidding $1,487.70 

Donations 192.66 

Raffle 251.00 

A strange “Polish” auction 26.00 
Total *1957.36 

Kudos and plaudits to all who 
assisted, all who participated, 
and all who paid their money. It 
was good to see Rick Woolley up 
and about, giving much needed 
countenance throughout the 
evening. The proceeds will 
benefit the East Bay AIDS 
Fund. 

Me thinks that 1985 will bring 
yet another series of auctions 
from the undisputable champs 
of fundraising. 

BAUBLE CONSEQUENCES 

(A Winning Mose!) 

ACIE’s prize buttons have 
not been forgotten. Those dia¬ 
dems embracing the line draw¬ 
ing of the teddy bear and pen¬ 
guin, and featuring a number in 
the lower section will result in 
prize money for a lucky few. The 
numbers were drawn, and here 
are the results: #123 wins $10; 
#103 wins $10; #18 wins $10; 


NEZ PAS 

#07 wins $25; and #238 wins 
$50. 

Contact the powers that be 
from the Court of Fire and Ice 
(Don and Cha Cha) for your 
long-awaited prize money. 

CRUCIBLE et MORTAR et 
PESTLE 

lA Pleasantly Surprised Mosel 

An unprecedented meeting 
was held at the Paradise on 
Wednesday night, Oct. 17. 
Emperor and Empress VI, 
Doug and Billy, gathered to¬ 
gether representatives of Big 
Mama’s, Spoiled Brat, and Turf 
Club from Hayward along with 
delegates from Bench & Bar, 
Lake Lounge, Revol, Paradise, 
and Town A Country. The Ju¬ 
bilee couldn’t attend because of 
illness; Ollie’s was inadvertent¬ 
ly missed in the invitations; two 
other bars weren’t asked be¬ 
cause of their continued dis¬ 
interest in the happenings of the 
Gay community in Alameda 
County. Other interested parties 
attending were Jim, King of 
Hearts of All California; Em¬ 
press I Suzie; Emperor of Ala¬ 
meda Chuck; and dynamic, la¬ 
borious Carolyn. 

To say that the Monarchs 
were on the hot seat is putting it 
rather mildly. To say that they 
can’t handle their own, would be 
misleading. To say that every¬ 
one was victorious would be an 
understatement. All cards, if 
you will, were laid upon the 
table and everyone who wished 
to cuss, discuss, and construc¬ 
tively criticize were allowed their 
time. 

Some shortcomings of the 
previous reigns, as seen by Doug 
and Billy, were most certainly 
recognized. Other foibles were 
brought to their attention and 
acknowledged. It would be to¬ 
tally unfair to the past Emperors 
and Empresses to put forth here 
the discussions that the evening 
contained because, not only 
were they not there, but the in¬ 
tent of the meeting was for the 
current reigning Monarchs at¬ 
titudes in working with the 
essential bars in Oakland and 
Hayward. 

Many fine outcomes were 
established and there seemed to 
be a unity unlike I have ever 
seen before. The idea of that 
split between Oakland and Hay¬ 
ward existed only in the minds 
of one particular court and we at 
the meeting unanimously decid¬ 
ed to give the idea a posthumous 
burial dated for that Court’s 
stepping down. If it becomes 
necessary for Doug and Billy to 
be out of town, it will be ex¬ 
pected that members of their 
court will represent them and 
continue the Court’s work while 
they are away. The Court hopes 
to establish a calendar of events 
so that fewer conflicting dates 

Benefit Rnminage 
Sale for AIDS Group 
At Russian River 

A benefit rummage sale, 
sponsored by the Russian River 
AIDS Support Group, will be 
held at the River Community 
Center, 15999 River Road in 
Guemeville, Oct. 27 and 28 
from 9 to 5. Proceeds from the 
sale go directly to people with 
AIDS. Donations of saleable 
goods will be accepted at RCS 
Friday, Oct. 2(>. For pickup or 
information call (707) 874-2810 
or (707) 8()9-(K)54. ■ 


will result than have in the past. 
The Court will establish the 
practice of having one charity- 
abetted function at least once a 
month, with said charity being 
other than Alameda County Im¬ 
perial Empire. 

Both Monarchs are very eager 
to erase the opinion of the “gen¬ 
eral populous” that the ACIE is 
an organization of Drag Queens 
doing drag shows in order for 
them to buy new dresses to 
travel out of town. As Empress 
Billy put it: “My definition of 
ACIE is a social, fundraising 
group out to help the entire com¬ 
munity, not just the Gay Com¬ 
munity.” 

Starting out with two strikes 
against it (the Investiture con¬ 
flicting with the Beaux Arts Ball 
and two errors on the investiture 
poster — no “y” in Hayward; no 
tickets for sale as advertised) all 
left the meeting with a feeling of 
confidence and renewed stimu¬ 
lation that this reign just might 
be a little — a lot? — different 
from the previous ones. 

NEZ’S NOTES: 

• Overheard in the tea-room at 
B<&B: Ed Paulson, “You’re not 
wearing any underwear.” Joe 
Garza, “No, but if things keep 
going as they are, I’ll be able to 
afford some.” 

• Paradise Bar and Grill now 
serves breakfast Monday 
through Friday from 7 a.m. to 
11a.m.; lunch starting at 
11 a.m. and served all day long; 
dinners are Monday through 
Saturday from 6 to 11 p.m. 
They have Happy Hour daily 
from 4 to 7 p.m. with a special 
H.O. menu. 

If something doesn’t fit, don’t 
force it. Get a larger hammer! 
I can smile on that. Love, ■ 

Nez 



Rev. Larry If hit sell 


New Pastor, 

New Location 
For Diablo MCC 

The Rev. Larry Whitsell is 
the new pastor of Diablo Valley 
Metropolitan Community 
Church in Concord. Prior to 
moving to the Contra Costa 
area. Rev. Whitsell was Assis¬ 
tant Pastor of Metropolitan 
Community Church of Tampa, 
Florida for two years; and 
before that, he was associated 
with the Metropolitan Commu¬ 
nity Churches in Montgomery, 
Alabama and St. Louis, Mis¬ 
souri. Rev. Whitsell succeeds 
Rev. Bob Cunningham, who re¬ 
signed earlier this year. 

Diablo Valley MCC also has 
announced a new location for its 
worship services and weekly ac¬ 
tivities. Effective Nov. 11, all 
church functions will be held at 
2247 Concord Boulevard in 
downtown Concord. For wor¬ 
ship times and additional infor¬ 
mation, phone (415) 827-2960. 




t>AvE’ s * 


IN RENO 

By the time you’ve found 
a room, checked out the 
guidebooks, taken a cab, 
cruised the field — You 
could have been having 
a wonderful time at 

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special video and BATH¬ 
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lockers, pool, sauna, 
whirlpool. sundeck, TV 
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sound and bar, parties 
every holiday, weekly 
drawings, generous park¬ 
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IN RENO 

There’s no place like it, 
so why go elsewhere? 


24 hours a day. 7 days a 
week in the 24-hour city. 

DAVE’S RENO RESORT 
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on motel rooms or bathhouse 






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1010 THE ALAMEDA SAN JOSE CA 408-275-1242 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 PAGE 21 



































Speciol Halloween Benefit 
& Costume Competition 

Wednesday, October 31st at 8:30pm- $20.00 
Includes: 

• The 8:30 performance of “After Dark" with 1 free drink. 

• $2.00 from every ticket sale to benefit the S.F. Aids Foundation! 

• Costume Competition after the performance. 

• Grand Prize: 2 round-trip air fares 

to Stockholm on Finnair!* 

* More prizes and lots more fun! 

•(Restrictions apply.) 

%F/NNH/R. 


NOW THROUGH NOV. 17! 

Tuesday thru Friday at 8:30, Saturday at 8:30 & 11:00 
Tues.-Thur. $15.50, Fri. & Sat. $17.50 
Reserved tables and seats 
Tickets at the Alcazar Theatre Box Office, 
BASS, Ticketron and other major agencies. 


650 Geary Street, San Francisco 

CHARGE BY PHONE: (415) 775-7100 


Fine French Food 

Personalized, with panache, for our good friends and neighbors. 
Distinctive Dinners: Nightly 6:00—10:00, except Tuesdays 
Bountiful Brunches: Saturdays and Sundays, 11:00—3:00 


THE WILLOWS 

708-710 Fourteenth Street 
(Market at Church) San Francisco 


For 

Reservations 

431-5266 


WIN! 

2 ROUND-TRIP TICKETS 
TO SWEDEN ON FINNAIR 
AND HELP BENEFIT THE 
S.F. AIDS FOUNDATION, TOO! 


"WOW! 

I was just knocked flat! 

Now THAT'S Entertainment." 

-Bill Harris, Entertainment Tonight 

"STUNNING, 

sometimes breathtaking visual extravaganza 
. . with costumes, sets and lights that 
will knock your eyes out." 

- Murry Frymer, San Jose Mercury 


"A CORKER! 

A lavish, luscious, 
leggy revue. .." 
-Pierce Carson, 

Napa Register 


Jerry Friedman presents 



• The Quintessential Image and After Eleven: stage 
performance, Theatre Rhinoceros, 2926 16th St., S.F., 
8:30 PM, cover. Theatre Rhino opens its season with 
two one-act plays, The Quintessential Image by Jane 
Chambers, and After Eleven by Victor Bumbalo. 

• Finders Keepers and The Window Shopper: stage 
performance, Studio Rhinoceros, 2926 16th St., S.F., 
8:30 PM, $7. The Studio opens its season with a play 
by Jay Byron Laws, with Real Life Romance by J.H. 
Ross. 

• Hissy Fits: comedy, Valencia Rose, 766 Valencia 
St., S.F., 10:30 PM, $5. With Doug Holsclaw, Suzy 
Berger, Ellen Brook Davis, Mario Mondelli, and Laurie 
Bushman. 

• Meet the Candidates: cocktail party. Atlas Savings 
and Loan, 1967 Market St., S.F., 7 to 9:30 PM, $6. 
Sponsored by the Golden Gate Business Association 
to meet candidates for the San Francisco Board of 
Supervisors. No speeches, no host bar and hors 
d'oeuvres. Call 956-8677 for reservations and more 
information. 

• Bay Area Lawyers for the Arts: 10th anniversary 
celebration, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 
Van Ness and McAllister, S.F., 7:30 PM, $20. Private 
showing of Diego Rivera: The Cubist Years, awards 
ceremony, refreshments and hors d'oeuvres. Call 
775-7200 for more information. 

• Double Exposure: music, Marne's, 389 Bay St. at 
Mason, S.F., 8:30 and 10 PM, $6. 

• Sylvia Plath: A Dramatic Portrait: stage perfor¬ 
mance, Studio Eremos, 499 Alabama St., S.F., 8 PM, 
$5. A three-woman play compiled and adapted from 
Plath's writings by Barry Kyle. 

• The Stickband: music, QT, 1312 Polk St., S.F., 9:30 
and 11 PM, 12:30 AM, free. A fusion of jazz, funk, 
and progressive rock. 

• Playing on an Impulse: stage performance, Valen¬ 
cia Rose, 766 Valencia St., S.F., 8 PM, $5. Starring 
Judy Sloan in a one-woman show. 

• Bad Mothers: stage performance, Julia Morgan 
Theater, 2640 College Ave., Berkeley, 8:30 PM, $7. 
The Plutonium Players in the further adventures of 
Ladies Against Women. 

• Jane and the Family Jewels: stage performance, 
Valencia Rose, 766 Valencia St., S.F., 9 and 11 PM, 
$6. Starring Jane Dornacker. 

• Patience: stage performance. Presentation Theater, 
2350 Turk St., S.F., 8:30 PM, $10 and $12. The 
Lamplighters in its 222nd production of Gilbert and 
Sullivan. 

• Little Shop of Horrors: stage performance, Warfield 
Theater, 982 Market St., S.F., 8 PM, $15, $20, and 
$22.50. The New York musical based on Roger Cor- 
man's sci-fi cult film. 

• Once is Never Enough: stage performance, People's 
Theatre Coalition, Fort Mason Center, Bldg. B, 8 PM, 
cover. The Asian-American Theater Company opens 
its 11th season. 

• Jazz: dance class, Pride Center Auditorium, 890 
Hayes St. at Fillmore, S.F., 6 to 7:30 PM, free. Begin¬ 
ning jazz taught by Ron Petersen. Wear gym clothes 
or loose clothing. 



• The Black Party in 3-D: Halloween comic book fan¬ 
tasy, Trocadero Transfer, 520 4th St., S.F., 10 PM un¬ 
til, $ 1 5. With Thelma Houston singing her new single, 
3-D glasses presented at the door. Call 495-0185 for 
more information. 

• Black and White Men Together: Halloween Party, 
First Unitarian Church, 1187 Franklin St., S.F., 9 PM 
to 1 AM, $8. Door prizes, prizes for the most outrage¬ 
ous attire, photo booth, no host bar. 

• Fraternal Order of Gays: Halloween party, FOG 
House, 2038 22nd Ave., S.F., 8:30 PM, $8. Haunted 
house, witches brew, costume prizes. 

• Halloween Party: The Boot Strap, 147 N. Aurora 
St., Stockton, 6 PM to 2 AM, free. Prizes for best 
costumes. 

• Ministry of Light: fall extravaganza, Le Camembert, 
Shoreline Highway, Mill Valley, 11 AM to 4 PM. Silent 
auction and raffles. A portion of bar profits and all raf¬ 
fle and auction proceeds will go to the Ministry of Light, 
a non-judgmental ministry with the Lesbian/Gay 
community. 

• Night of Hell: Halloween masquerade ball, New 
Generic, 2 Clinton Park, S.F., $5. Classic and modern 
horror fil,ms, live performance by Nell Stewart of 
Function/Disorder, N.Y.C. Costume judging and prizes 
awarded at midnight. Call 558-8112 for more in¬ 
formation. 

• Exotic Erotic Ball: Halloween extravaganza. Pier 45, 
S.F., 8 PM to 2 AM. Costume contest, breakdance ex¬ 
hibition and contest, exotic acts and dancers, music 
by Big City, The Looters, and Mojo. 

• The Quintessential Image and After Eleven: stage 
performance (see Friday listing for details). 



Stranger things will happen than this unlikely < 


• Finders Keepers and The Windowshopper: stage 
performance (see Friday listing for details). 

• Gay Comedy Night: comedy, Valencia Rose, 766 
Valencia St., S.F., 10 PM, $5. With Marga Gomez, 
Linda Moakes, Karen Ripley, Teresa Chandler, and 
Annie Larson. 

• Car Wash: to benefit the San Francisco AIDS Foun¬ 
dation, Union 76 station, Market and Duboce Sts., 
S.F., 9 AM to 6 PM, cars $3, trucks and vans $5. 
Sponsored by the Touchstone Society. 

• Sylvia Plath: A Dramatic Portrait: stage performance 
(see Friday listing for details). 

• Playing on an Impulse: stage performance (see Fri¬ 
day listing for details). 

• Bad Mothers: stage performance (see Friday listing 
for details). 

• Jane and the Family Jewels: stage performance (see 
Friday listing for details). 

• Little Shop of Horrors: stage performance, 7 and 
10 PM, $20, $22.50, and $25 (see Friday listing for 
details). 

• Patience: stage performance (see Friday listing for 
details). 

• Once is Never Enough: stage performance (see Fri¬ 
day listing for details). 



• A Safe Light: stage performance, Ollie's, 4130 
Telegraph Ave., Oakland, 8:30 PM, $5. Written and 
directed by Adele Prandini. 


• San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus: 6th birthday din¬ 
ner party and cabaret, Green Room, Veteran's War 
Memorial, S.F., 7 PM, $15. Costumfes encouraged, 
awards presentation, entertainment by the chorus. Call 
864-0326 for more information. 

• Gay and Lesbian Outreach to Elders: tea dance for 
Lesbians over 60 and their women friends, San Fran¬ 
cisco Home Health Services, 225 30th St., S.F., 3 to 
6 PM. Call Sheryl Goldberg at 626-7000 for more, 
information. 

• The Quintessential Image and After Eleven: stage 
performance (see Friday listing for details). 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 22 




























• Gay Comedy Open Mike: comedy, Valencia Rose 
766 Valencia St., S.F., 8:30 PM, $3. Tom Ammiano 
and Monica Palacios will co-emcee. Performer sign-uD 
at 7:30 PM. a W 


TUESDAY 30 


• San Francisco Hiking Club: day hike, Trail of Dis¬ 
covery/Pacifica, meet at 8:45 AM at Rolling Pin 
Donuts, 497 Castro St., S.F. Lunch in Linda Mar. 

• A Safe Light: stage performance (see Sunday listing 
for details). 

• Samantha Samuels: music, 132 Bush, 132 Bush 
St., S.F., 6 to 8 PM, cover. Sam is coming home again. 

• Val Diamond: music, Marne's, 389 Bay St. at 
Mason, S.F., 8:30 and 10 PM, $7. 

• In Search of. . . and Older. . . Wiser: playreading. 
Room 300, Bldg. C, Fort Mason, S.F., 7:30 PM, $2. 
An evening of one-act plays by Jeannie Barroga. 

• Food as Fashion: costume competition, OPTS, 489 
3rd St., S.F., 7:30 PM to 1 2:30 AM, $ 10. Restaura¬ 
teur/food critic Stanley Eichelbaum, architect Piero 
Patri, and comedian Jane Dornacker will judge cos¬ 
tumes for edibility, fashion design, newsworthiness, 
and artistic statement. To benefit Meals on Wheels. 
Call 543-1822 for more information. 

• International Folk Dancing: dance class, Nova 
Academy, 347 Dolores St., S.F., 7 to 9 PM, $2. No 
pre-registration necessary. Call 552-8413 for more 
information. 


WEDNESDAY 31 


• Masquerade Ball: Hotel Atherton and Lounge, 685 
Ellis St., S.F., 8 PM to 2 AM, $1. Prizes, raffle, free 
buffet. Costumes required, to benefit the San Francisco 
AIDS Foundation. 

• Frujt Punch: radio, KPFA (94 FM), 10 PM. Jon Sugar 
interviews Sister Boom Boom and poets Thom Gunn 
and Pat Parker. Music by Timmy Spence and Charlie. 

• The Quintessential Image and After Eleven: stage 
performance (see Friday listing for details). 

• The Vera Charles Steamer Trunk Ball: Halloween 
at Marne's, 389 Bay St. at Mason, S.F., 8:30 PM, $15. 
With Jeremy Kramer and Tom Ammiano. 

• Samantha Samuels: music (see Tuesday listing for 
details). 

• Jane and the Family Jewels: stage performance, 
9 PM, $5 (see Friday listing for details). 


THURSDAY 1 


tage 

766 

nez, 

and 

oun- 

5ts., 

$5. 

snce 


i Fri¬ 


tting 


and 
I for 

3 for 

: Fri- 

3 

130 

and 


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Call 


3 for 
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• Finders Keepers and The Windowshopper: stage 
performance, $6 (see Friday listing for details). 

• We Three: music, Valencia Rose, 766 Valencia St., 
S.F., 8 PM, $5. Seattle-based trio of women in a cap- 
pella stylings of traditional folk songs, jazz, and their 
own compositions. 

• San Francisco FrontRunners: run around Stow Lake, 
begins at 10 AM at the Stow Lake boathouse, Golden 
Gate Park, S.F., one to five miles. 

• Different Spokes: ride to Marin Cheese Factory, 75 
miles. Call 552-8942 for start time and location. Also, 
a Fairfax/Bolinas ride will be held, 35 miles. Call 
552-3567 for start time and location. 

• San Francisco Hiking Club: day hike to Mount 
Tamalpais/Pantal Ranger Station, meet at 9:45 AM at 
the Safeway at Market and Church Sts., S.F., under 
the large sign..Bring lunch and water, rain will cancel. 

• EastBay FrontRunners: run in urban Oakland, meet 
at 9:30 AM in front of the Lake Merritt crew boat¬ 
house. Call 526-7315 or 527-9167 for more in¬ 
formation. 

• Tropical Nights: music, El Rio, 3158 Mission St., 
S.F., 4 to 8 PM, cover. Salsa, Samba, Funk, and Jazz. 
The last concert of the season. 

• Sylvia Plath: A Dramatic Performance: stage per¬ 
formance (see Friday listing for details). 

• Drop-in VD Clinic: sponsored by the Gay Men's 
Health Collective, 2339 Durant Ave., Berkeley, 7 to 
9 PM, free and confidential. Testing and treatment for 
gonorrhea, syphilis, NGU, scabies, lice, etc., also 
counseling and referrals. Call 644-0425 for more 
information. 

• Little Shop of Horrors: stage performance, 3 PM, 
$13.50, $15.50, and $18.50 (see Friday listing for 
details). 

• Once is Never Enough: stage performance, 3 and 
7 PM (see Friday listing for details). 


•* All Join Hands: Gay square dancing, dancers from 
every club join hands at 2140 Market St., S.F., 5 to 
7:30 PM, donation. 



• The Times of Harvey Milk: film, Castro Theatre, 429 
Castro St., S.F., 8 PM. West Coast premiere in a 
benefit for the Shanti Project in honor of its 10th 
anniversary, and the Harvey Milk Film Project. Gala 
celebration to follow in the Green Room of the San 
Francisco War Memorial. The film opens at the Lumiere 
Theatre Nov. 2. 

• Bella Abzug: will address her concerns with election- 
year politics at a luncheon, Marine's Memorial Club 
ballroom, 609 Sutter St., S.F., 11:30 AM, $45. A 
benefit for S.F. supervisorial candidate Pat Norman. 
Chronicle columnist Warren Hinkle will make introduc¬ 
tory remarks. Call 621-1780 for reservations and more 
information. 

• Hissy Fits: comedy (see Friday listing for details). 

• The Quintessential Image and After Eleven: stage 
performance (see Friday listing for details). 

• Finders Keepers and The Windowshopper: stage 
performance, $6 (see Friday listing for details). 

• Gwen Majors: music, Clementina's Baybrick Inn, 
1190 Folsom St., S.F., 7 to 9 PM, R&B. 

• Samantha Samuels: music (see Tuesday listing for 
details). 

• Jean Ritchie: music, Julia Morgan Theatre, 2640 
College Ave., Berkeley, 8 PM, $6. 

• Writing Workshop: for seniors 60 and older. Opera¬ 
tion Concern, 1853 Market St., S.F., 7 PM. Sponsored 
by Gay and Lesbian Outreach to Elders. Call George 
Birimisa at 431-6254 for more information. 

• Jane and the Family Jewels: stage performance, 
9 PM, $5 (see Friday listing for details). 

• Western Star Dancers: beginners square dance 
class, VMCA, 220 Golden Gate, 2nd floor, S.F., 
7:30 PM. Call 864-6134 for more information. 


The Bay Area Reporter welcomes organizations, 
businesses, and individuals to submit items for its 
weekly calendar. Placement in the calendar is free and 
the sole responsibility of the editors. Deadline: 5 PM 
on Thursdays. 


ta 9 e • a Safe Light: stage performance (see Sunday listing 

for details). 



\4m 

Prawns 


Its all right here waiting for you. 

Our light, beautifully presented Calamari 
and other exotic seafood salads- 
perfection, / ^== ==== == i—^ 


Our hearty, combination Creole of prawns, 
scallops, shrimp, crab and clams is a 
generous blend of savory ocean offerings. 
Some say this is Heaven. 

,/ai ffi 


But there’s more at the 
Half Shall Seafood Bar & Grill, 


This is the seafood restaurant that sizzles 
with the exciting and the extraordinary. 


Welcome 


The Half-Shell, Seafood Bar & Grill 
64 Rausch Street, off 
Folsom between 7th and 8th Streets 
415.552.7677 


Monday-Friday Ha.m.-IOp.m. 
Saturdays 6 p.m.-IO p.m. 


A lunching + dining + 
drinking place where 
San Francisco gathers to 
enjoy house specials like 
Smoked English Haddock, 
Norwegian Salmon and 
Soft Shell Crab. 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 23 




































BARRY FOSTER 
JUDY FARFITT 
LESLIE PHILUPS 
ZENA WALKER 


PETER NICHOLS' 


HEATHER WRIGHT 
PATRICIA HENEGHAN 

DMECTEDBY 

MIKEOCKRENT 

DESIGNED BY 

MARTIN JOHNS 

LIGHTING BY 

JOE DAVIS 


RTS & ENTERTAINMEN 


A matinee and an evening 
provided the chance to catch up 
with England’s current hot play¬ 
wright, Michael Frayn. He’s 
won four awards for Best Com¬ 
edy of the Year, the last for his 


VAUDEVILLE THEATRE 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 24 


never guess Noises Off and 
Benefactors were written by the 
same person. Each has its own 
brand of wk and excels in its 
field, and both demand strict 
timing, which is supplied by 
their shared director, Michael 
Blakemore (Privates on Pa¬ 
rade), but they are poles apart 
in style and content. 

Noises Off is a backstage 
farce about the production of an 
onstage farce which is touring 
the provinces. It’s seen from 
various angles in its final re¬ 
hearsal and two performances 
several week apart. All theatri¬ 
cal types except Gays are 
brought into the play, and 
everything that can go wrong 
does. The second act is the fun¬ 
niest, showing what goes on be¬ 
hind all those slamming doors. 
The last act, if a slight letup, 
could hardly be called a let¬ 
down. 

Benefactors is' a contempo¬ 
rary drama about the inter¬ 
twined lives of two couples — a 
successful architect and an un¬ 
successful journalist — and their 
wives. The architect is planning 
to tear down slums for a hous¬ 
ing project which, beset by bu¬ 
reaucracy, keeps high-rising out 
of control. It becomes a hot 
political issue which threatens to 
divide both families, like the 
divided set which represents the 
brown and gray world in which 
they live. 

After watching the Noises 
Off cast knock itself out in the 
afternoon, it was refreshing to 
see the people of Benefactors 
discuss things intelligently and, 
for the most part, quietly — two 
such different children of the 
same immensely gifted parent. 

★ ★ ★ 

Little needs to be added to the 
praise that’s been heaped on 
Tom Stoppard’s The Real 
(Continued on page 39f 


Mainstream British 


Theater 


There’s Lots to See, and the 
Price is Right 


Part II of Two Parts 


by Steve Warren 


Y ou can go to the theater every night for a week in London for 
the cost of one full-price ticket to a Broadway musical. With 
the current strength of the dollar, prices are running less than 
half what they are in New York, and tickets to all but a very few 
shows are available on the day of performance at the half-price 
booth on Leicester Square. 

Two that are not discounted are London’s most successful 
musicals, both examples of the theater trying to keep itself healthy 
by pricing itself out of existence. Each in its way gives an audience 
its money’s worth, but I can’t praise either unreservedly. 


The main problem with 
Singin’ in the Rain the night I 
saw it was Roy Sone, who was 
filling in for vacationing star 
(and director) Tommy Steele. 
Sone understudies both Steele 
and co-star Roy Castle, so 
there’s no excuse for his being so 
ill-prepared, especially in the 
duets, when it was apparently 
planned in advance for him to be 
performing that week. 

Based on the MGMusical 
classic, the show is to Hollywood 
what 42nd Street — also a cur¬ 
rent London hit — is to Broad¬ 
way. The story of how sound 
changed Tinseltown to Tonsil- 
town — probably the only new 
joke in the script — is still amus¬ 
ing, with the bitchy, screechy¬ 
voiced star getting her comeup¬ 
pance in the end. Considering 
that the plot also deals with the 
invention of lip-synching, it’s 
dangerous to have any vocals 
pre-recorded — and here again 
the understudy blew it. 


About half the songs and 
dances are from the movie. “Be 
a Clown’’ from The Pirate re¬ 
places “Make ’em Laugh,” with 
Donald O’Connor’s incredible 
dance number made a bit easier 
for Castle. The costumes and 
some of the choreography of 
“Fascinating Rhythm” are 
lifted from A Chorus Line. 

The sets (Terry Parsons, de¬ 
signer) and such gimmicks as 
rain, a train, and filmed bits 
carry the night for London’s 
lovers of old-fashioned musical 
comedy, but the show will need 
an overhaul when it tries to cross 
the ocean this season. 

★ ★ ★ 

One train is presumably not 
enough for the rock-and-roll set, 
so Starlight Express has an all¬ 
train cast — that is, they’re all 
people, but they’re on roller 
skates so they can play trains. 

You have to see it to believe 


will tour the States as an arena 
show — a la Holiday on Ice, 
Disney on Parade, etc. — 
rather than heading for Broad¬ 
way. That makes sense, if a 
traveling version of the complex 
set can be built at a cost that 
won’t be prohibitive. 

Due to the physical demands 
of the show, there’s a high rate 
of cast changes nightly. I think 
I saw the original “Poppa,” Lon 
Statton. Whoever he was, he 
had an extraordinary voice. 

It takes almost half of the first 
act to introduce all the charac¬ 
ters and set up the simple plot of 
a rivalry among steam, diesel, 
and electric trains, steam being 
our heroes. There’s incidental 
girl-train-meets-boy-train, pas¬ 
senger vs. freight train, and 
“May the Starlight Express be 
with you” nonsense, but it all 
boils down to the whirring of 
machinery and skate wheels in 
a show that’s all flash. 


The score of this rock opera is 
recognizably by Andrew Lloyd 
Webber, with lyrics this time by 
Richard Stilgoe. The range of 
music is shown at the top of Act 
Two when a breakdance is fol¬ 
lowed by a country ballad. De¬ 
spite a weak beginning, there are 
half a dozen good songs. 

Call it a show, call it the 
Roller-skating Olympics, Star¬ 
light Express is packing them 
in in London. I liked it better 
than Cats, which I didn’t like 
much at all. 


first Broadway hit, Noises Off, 
and his Benefactors is a leading 
contender for this year’s best 
drama. 

If you didn’t know, you’d 


STAGE 




















































Extraordinarily wise and sensitive 
brilliant.” - USA Today 


One huge surprise hit.” 

- Seattle Post-Intelligence 


THE FILM WHICH IS ALREADY CAPTURING THE CRITICS 

THE TIMES OF 
HARVEY MILK 


W* 


“Immensely moving. Combines real emotional urgency with a most 
compelling grasp of the documentary craft.” - Village Voice 

“Warm, well-made ... a story with urgency, passion and, finally 
indignation.” - The New York Times 

“Tears as well as cheers Both sobering and heartening .. . packed with 

truth, tragedy and indignation.” - US Magazine 

A passion-filled, deeply moving film of 
intelligence and balance.” - Los Angeles Times 


A Film by ROBERT EPSTEIN and RICHARD SCHMEICHEN / A TC Films International Release 1984 

Narrated by HARVEY FIERSTEIN 


GAIA BENEFIT PREMIERE HONORING THE TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF SHANTI PROJECT 

Thursday, November 1,1984 Castro Theatre 8:00 PM 
Celebration Party Following in The Green Room of The War Memorial Building 


-TICKETS: 


$10 Premiere 

$25 Premiere and Party 

Above Tickets available at Headlines and 
Gramophone stores. 


$100 Patron: Two tickets. Premiere, Pre-film Buffet 
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Seating, Gala Celebration, Program Listing. 
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EXCLUSIVE NORTHERN CALIFORNIA PREMIERE ENGAGEMENT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, LUMIERE THEATRE. 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 25 












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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 


If They Could See Her Now 


by Dianne Gregory 

S hirley MacLaine says it’s not 
true what people think — 
that she’s a perpetual human 
dynamo. Her show at the Or- 
pheum both bears out that state¬ 
ment and gives its lie. 

In two hours of non-stop 
song, dance, drama, and schtick 
MacLaine celebrates herself, her 
varied entertainment career, 


monologues from three of her 
movies: Some Came Running, 
The Turning Point, and 
Terms of Endearment. She 
does this amidst chat and song 
about her movie career, how out 
of 40 movies she played 11 
hookers and many dishrags and 
doormats, and how her roles in 
her last - two movies have 
changed all that. 

“We’re not supposed to be 


'And the dance numbers . . 

were active and sweaty, proving 
(MacLaine) can still hoof it with 
the best of them.' 


and what it took her to get here 
from there. She is literally on the 
stage the entire time, making 
costume changes either in front 
of the audience, masking what 
she’s doing with casual chat and 
artful costume design, or in a 
flash of elbows and knees on the 
darkened stage back among the 
violins. She gives us her all. In 
this she is a perpetual human 
dynamo. 


victims and doormats in Fein- 
stein Land,’’ she said. 

The dramatic monologues 
were powerfully evocative. You 
could hear a pin drop as Mac¬ 
Laine was reduced to tears by 
unfeeling nurses in a scene from 
Terms of Endearment, or as 
she told her friend Emma off in 
a scene from The Turning 
Point. 



“I cannot do away in my life 
with live performing,” Mac¬ 
Laine said at a press conference 
before her show opened. “Even 
if I get too old to kick my legs 
up and stuff, I’ll kick ’em half¬ 
way up.” 

But, even though MacLaine’s 
dancing is something she has 
done well for many years and 
can do better than most today, 
the numbers she performed were 
not the athletic events of which 
she was once capable. And she’s 
never been known for her sing¬ 
ing, with good reason. She can 
carry a tune, which is more than 
some people in the entertain¬ 
ment industry can say, but that’s 
about it. Her voice warbles, and 
the high notes were painful at 
times. 

The strength of her perfor¬ 
mance, and of this stage of her 
career, is her acting ability — 
which has eclipsed her ability to 
dance. Two sections of the show 
illustrate this point. 

One section was given over to 


And the dance numbers — 
illustrating the style of three 
famous choreographers — were 
active and sweaty, proving she 
can still hoof it with the best of 
them. But you could tell Mac¬ 
Laine was pacing herself. 

“You remember the dance 
number from The Pajama 
Game called “Steam Heat,” of 
course. Well, we’re not gonna do 
it,” she said. 

But that’s okay. MacLaine is 
so alive, so warm, that she ex¬ 
udes the old Broadway message 
of Get Up and Live. The show 
is about her, but what she really 
means to do with it is give us all 
a shot in the arm. 

“We are not victims of the 
world we see,” MacLaine said 
at the press conference. “We are 
victims of the way we see the 
world.” 

If they could see her now. I 

Shirley MacLaine 

Orpheum Theatre 
Through Nov. 4; 474-3800 


PAGE 26 













































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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 27 




















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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 28 


HH 


Thanks, and We Deserve It 


by John F. Karr 

T heatre Rhinoceros got its 
new season merrily under¬ 
way last weekend with two 
laugh-each-line comedies, Jane 
Chambers’ The Quintessential 
Image and Victor Bumbalo’s 
After Eleven. The evening 
began on a high note with the 
presentation to Beth Allen, 
Chambers’ lover, of the Best 
Production award for last sea¬ 
son’s Chambers play A Late 
Snow. Quipped Allen, “Jane 
would have said, ‘Thank you, 
and I deserve it.’” 

W e all deserve these two com¬ 
edies. Neither one is a stick- 
your-head-in-the-sand affair, 
but there’s serious drama down 
the road. For now, relax and 
have a good time. Rhino’s back, 
and in good form. 

★ ★ ★ 

Taste is prevalent here, for if 
neither of the plays is earth- 
shaking, they’re both well- 
crafted works by established 
talents, consistently well-acted. 
Chambers’ play (the last she 
wrote before her terminal ill¬ 
ness) finds talk show hostess 
Margaret Foy (Carrie Collier) 
preparing to interview world 
famous photographer Lacey 
Lanier (J. Renee Gilbert). Foy 
prompts the studio audience on 
taping procedure: Nothing can 
go wrong, unless a lens falls off. 
“Oh God,” she whispers to 
herself, “wouldn’t that be just 
like life?” 

That’s the tip-off, and of 
course, things go wrong. The 
obvious is true — Lacey is a Les¬ 
bian. But that’s the least of it. 
There are enough skeletons rat¬ 
tling around the closets of this 
soundstage to keep a daytime 
soap cliffhanging for a week. 
Chambers unearths them all in 
a half-hour, and throws in a 
chiller finale, too. 

Gilbert is a deadpan delight as 
the nonplussed, not to be side¬ 
tracked Lanier, and Collier 
grows ever more delightful the 
more “plussed” she gets. 

The Quintessential Image is 
what they call a curtain-raiser. 
Its left jabs, though, show the 
need for a little curtain-raising 
in life. You’ll be so busy laugh¬ 
ing you won’t notice it creeping 
up behind you. 


Victor Bumbalo does the 
same in After Eleven. He gets 
you laughing on the right and 
then throws a quick jab at the 
left. The story concerns two 
slightly over-the-hill lovers who 
have rented a hustler. In time¬ 
worn tradition, one wants it, the 
other doesn’t. 

“Happy Hunks” supplies the 
hustler, because Francis (Gerald 
Duff) want to have “a few 
laughs before the tits drop.” He 
urges Kenny (Richard Elliot) to 
put on something hot, which 
makes the sedentary Kenny 
wish Gay men could just send 
their clothes out to fuck. 

They spar comically for some 
time, and although I laughed at 
the jokes, I wondered, why were 
we watching this? It must be the 
oldest plot in Gay theater — two 
lovers rent a hustler. And then 
this, too, crept up behind me. 

When the hustler arrives — 
and he is a hunk — tables turn 
so quickly somebody should 
have sent out for a lazy susan. 
Imagine if Fred and Ethel 
Mertz were both men, sent out 


for a hustler, and got one who 
came with a script written by 
Tom Stoppard. The old story 
takes quite a lovingly relevant 
twist. Laugh all you want — 
until you meet yourself on the 
stage. It’s lightly handled, never 
preachy, but who expected Fred 
and Ethel Mertz to be con¬ 
temporary? 

John Simpson’s hustler is the 
first hunk I’ve seen who could 
also act — he nearly steals the 
show with his eyes alone. Gerald 
Duff is desperate he’ll never hit 
the sack, and Richard Elliot as 
Kenny shows there have never 
been more shades to woebegone 
or conniving. 

The set, by Judith Ogus, is 
underdressed. R.L. Waugh’s 
lights are excellent. The cos¬ 
tumes, by Lorraine Cathey- 
Barber, are most appropriate. 
Cynthia Wilson directed The 
Quintessential Image with 
assurety. If Ed Turney has 
overstated the case for After 
Eleven, it’s still a diverting 
romp. And a merry top of the 
season to you, Rhino! ■ 

Chambers and Bumbalo 

One-Acts 

Theatre Rhinoceros 
Through Dec. 2; 861-5079 



Changed Direction 


by Bernard Spunberg 

W hy mess around with ex¬ 
cellence? A Safe Light, by 
Adele Prandini, received 
its premier production last 
spring at Theatre Rhino. Re¬ 
written, recast, and redirected 
by the playwright, A Safe Light 
is currently in production at 
Ollie’s, a Lesbian bar in Oak¬ 
land. Last spring the play was 
not perfect. There was some 
unnecessary reliance on mono¬ 
logue, and the production suf¬ 
fered from some shaky charac¬ 
terization. Still, Prandini’s 
drama about three women con¬ 
fronting life, love, and death was 
— and is — tender and sincere. 
The play reveals a gift for com¬ 
pressing powerful, complicated 
emotions into a few evocative 
phrases. Those phrases fre¬ 
quently take flight in soaring 
arches of poetry. Best of all, A 
Safe Light depicts relationships 
among middle-aged Lesbians. 
By focusing on a lifestyle dram¬ 
atized all too seldom, Prandini’s 
work expands our notion of Gay 
culture and identity. 

Prandini’s new draft begins 
with a monologue with which 
the play used to end. A funny 
restaurant scene has been cut. 


Both changes amount to ner¬ 
vous twiddling rather than 
either structural improvement or 
damage. There are probably lots 
more adjustments, but memory 
fails to pinpoint any other 
substantial differences. Memory 
does, however, recall emotional 
impact. Last spring, A Safe 
Light made me cry. This fall, it 
didn’t. 

Prandini’s direction obscures 
dimensions that give her play 
depth. One of the characters has 
poured energy into her art, 
friendship with the central char¬ 
acter, and pre-Stonewall politi¬ 
cal activism. Pran'dini’s words 
convey salty wisdom and 
warmth flowing from a lifetime 
of experience. Louise Minnick’s 
portrayal of the activist has a 
deadpan comic flair that gets 
lots of laughs, but her smooth 
baby face is not that of a middle- 
aged dyke who’s been beaten by 
cops. She’s just a kid. 

Marion Eaton’s portrayal of 
a middle-aged grandmother ex¬ 
presses the joy and pathos of 
love found and lost, but not the 
inner conflict of a mature 
woman taking her first steps out 
of the closet. Under Prandini’s 
direction, Eaton’s justly weight¬ 
ed, believable emotionalism 


skims over rather than outlines 
internal drama. 

Michele Simon’s emotional¬ 
ism is also well-calibrated but 
generalized. A role in Jane 
Chambers’ A Late Snow at 
Theatre Rhino last season 
proved Simon capable of multi¬ 
layered characterization. Under 
Prandini’s direction, Simon’s 
portrayal touches all the right 
points but digs into few of them. 
Simon’s physicality also works 
against her. Her youth, health, 
and vigor are not usually ob¬ 
served in middle-aged worka¬ 
holics perched at death’s door. 

Though Prandini’s changes in 
A Safe Light cause no apparent 
damage, remembered emotional 
impact suggests her earlier in¬ 
spiration was best. The version 
seen last spring was ready to 
lead a life independent of its 
creator. That version now cries 
out for a production with sea¬ 
soned actors right for their roles, 
an imaginative director, and 
enough budget for a real set. 

Adele Prandini is a writer of 
style and substance. She need 
not spend another minute on 
A Safe Light. Her as-yet- 
unwritten plays need her more. 

A Safe Light 

Ollie’s 

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BACK TO BATON 


“Though I speed not, 

I cannot miss.” 

PHILIP CAMPBELL 


I t’s been four years since I last 
spoke with composer John 
Adams, but that first conver¬ 
sation was enough to convince 
me he was embarked on an ex¬ 
citing career. It might have been 
his disarming candor, intelli¬ 
gence, and friendly enthusiasm 
or, simply that we are the same 
age and share the same opin¬ 
ions. But I knew, without hav¬ 
ing heard a note of his music, 
that here was a man with a 
future. 

What pleasure it gives me to 
report that, after a recent inter¬ 
view, I found him the same gen¬ 
tle and gracious person, with the 
same charming, if somewhat 
curious humility. Curious be¬ 
cause most writers would be suf¬ 
fering a bad case of swollen head 
after all the positive and 
sometimes feverish praise he’s 
received during the intervening 
years. 

Time magazine’s Michael 
Walsh called him “The fastest 
rising minimalist' composer — 
and potentially the most influen- 
tial of all,” and Esquire 
magazine in 1984 named John 
Adams “one of the 40 most im¬ 
portant young Americans under 
the age of 40.” Pretty heady 
stuff for a guy who was prepar¬ 
ing a lecture on Verdi’s “Otello” 
for the San Francisco Conser¬ 
vatory the first time we met. 


now, a refugee from the ever- 
weirder Haight. He’s the new 
father of a five-month-old child, 
bemused by his “Yuppie” neigh¬ 
bors and free, at last, of his 
burdensome teaching chores due 
to his position as Composer-in- 
Residence with the San Fran¬ 
cisco Symphony. 

White he’s voluntarily leaving 
that post next season — coinci¬ 
dental with the departure of 
Music Director Edo de Waart 
— he has nothing but praise for 
the program, initiated amazing¬ 
ly enough by the Exxon Corpor¬ 
ation of their own volition. 

“The gap between audiences 
and modern composers is shock¬ 
ing,” he says, “but often even 
fellow musicians are difficult to 
approach.” Adams feels the gen¬ 
erosity of Exxon has helped con¬ 
siderably. As Composer-in-Res- 
idence he is financially able to 
devote all his time to writing and 
the promotion and production of 
his own, and other new writers’ 
work. 

This deep commitment to 
cralt is manifest in his ongoing 
involvement with the Sympho¬ 
ny’s New and Unusual Music 
series which he helped create 
with Maestro de Waart. The 
series opened its fifth con¬ 
secutive season last week and 
will continue through Decem¬ 
ber. John will conduct two out 
of the five concerts while he con¬ 
tinues work on his new score 
“Harmonielehre,” scheduled for 
premiere at Davies Hall in 
March. 

Admitting to something like a 
premature mid-life crisis, he 
says the work is tough going. 
Faced with that peculiarly 
American syndrome of always 
having to top one’s last effort 
and resolutely opposed to only 
writing blockbusters, Adams 
knows he’ll have to withstand 
the cynical observations of 
critics who will demand more 
and more of his talent. 

He recognizes himself in a 


period of crucial transition, and 
he’s still young enough to be 
worried. Disgusted by the treat¬ 
ment his esteemed colleague 
Edo de Waart has received from 
local audiences and critics at a 
critical point in his development, 
Adams wonders at the percep¬ 
tion of de Waart as mediocre — 
“after fine-tuning this orchestra 
into one of the best in the coun¬ 
try” — and realizes this could 
happen to anyone in the public 
eye. 

John is delighted, however, 
by the diversity of audiences at¬ 
tending the New and Unusual 
Music series. 


my programming that very few 
people buy subscriptions,” he 
said. Each concert seems to at¬ 
tract a difference audience. 
“People who flock to see Keith 
Jarrett don’t give a damn about 
Elliot Carter, and those that ap¬ 
preciate a Robert Ashley eve¬ 
ning avoid a Schoenberg re¬ 
cital.” 

There are crossover com¬ 
posers like Steve Reich and 
Philip Glass who seem to appeal 


to most everyone, but Adams 
does not include himself in their 
ranks, saying his own work 
sounds too traditionally “clas¬ 
sical.” 

This may be true of his large 
choral music, such as the gor¬ 
geously exciting “Harmonium” 
but I sense his more “mini¬ 
malist” efforts, such as “Shaker 
Loops,” (available on disc in a 


chamber setting and to be re¬ 
leased in January with full string 
orchestra) will open the eyes of 
previously uninterested au¬ 
diences. 

Andrew Porter, august critic 
for The New Yorker, has nam¬ 
ed Adams the creator of “a flex¬ 
ible new language capable of 
producing large scale works that 
are both attractive and strongly 


fashioned.” He goes on to say 
that “His is a music whose high¬ 
ly polished, perfectly resonant 
sound is wonderful.” 

Of course, John is pleased 
with such reactions, but hastens 
to add it was Porter who called 
“Grand Pianola Music” — one 
of the composer’s personal fav¬ 
orites — “stupefyingly banal.” 

“Look what time has done to 
someone like Gian Carlo Menot- 
ti,” Adams said. “He was once 
everyone’s darling and now he’s 
considered old hat.” 

Regardless of Adams' per¬ 
sonal misgivings, and he admits 
he remains his toughest critic, 
his future looks promising in¬ 
deed. He has his first dance 
score under his belt, “Light Over 
Water” choreographed by Lu¬ 
cinda Childs under the title 
“Available Light” and soon to 
be released by New Albion 
Records. “Harmonium” is 
already recorded and available 
in January on the excellent 


ECM label, which proves him 
capable of writing beautiful 
vocal music. His self-proclaimed 
“bad boy” piece, “Grand 
Pianola Music,” — “It flowed 
out of me with an ease and need 
that was incredible” — con¬ 
ducted by Randsom Wilson 
with Solisti New York, is now 
available on Angel Digital. And 
last, but perhaps most exciting, 
he’s collaborating with wunder- 
kind director Peter Sellars — 
notorious for his Mikado and 
fired from Broadway’s My One 
and Only for being too far out 
— on a full scale opera intrigu- 
ingly titled “Nixon in China.” 

Compared to some, Adams’ 
output is relatively spare. He 
seems to be pacing himself, and 
his conducting activities divert 
energy. But, in the context of a 
four-year span, his work gleams 
with the brilliance of fire that 
has just begun to flare. Adams 
appears easy going, and he tru¬ 
ly is a nice guy, but there is an 
undercurrent of determination 
and common sense that displays 
his Yankee roots and convinces 
me the momentum he’s gather¬ 


ing is not only deserved but 
inevitable. 

After our relaxed and satisfy¬ 
ing conversation I was put in 
mind of a line from John 
Donne’s poem “Negative 
Love,” which John Adams set so 
exquisitely in “Harmonium,” 
“Though I speed not, I cannot 
miss.” It is appropos of John 
Adams, and certainly self-pro¬ 
phetic. ■ 


Adams lives in north Berkeley 

'It attests to the catholicity of my pro¬ 
gramming that very few people buy 
subscriptions/ 

— John Adams 


“It attests to the catholicity of 


'The gap between audience and modern 
composers is shocking/ 

— John Adams 



BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 PAGE 30 
























EVEN IN BABYLON 


Singing and Selling It 


PACHE, OSCAR 
HAMMERSTEIN 

The game of just supposing as 
the sweetest game we know 
ought to be a consensual act be¬ 
tween adults. To many a would- 
be star, however, when the 
things they dream about don’t 
happen to be so, it’s just an 
unimportant technicality. Un¬ 
daunted, they’ll use every cun¬ 
ning tactic of their talent to 
seduce us into consenting to 
their fantasy. Much of the time, 
with a public all too desirous for 
delusion, they’re successful. 

SISTER SURELY 
EXPLAINS IT ALL 

Such a one is Surely Mac- 
Laine, a monument to the im¬ 
portance of being earnest. Not 
really a singer, not really a 
dancer — what does she do? 
Convince us she’s the greatest 
star. 

Surely’s last show was about 
Show-biz, a tight and snappy 
Las Vegas Knock-out. Her cur¬ 
rent show is about herself, a 
meandering, Surely smorgas¬ 
bord. But she’s the sincerest gal 
on earth. It’s heretical to ques¬ 
tion, and foolish to resist her 
sincerity, which binds the shreds 
and patches of the show, gives 


JOHN F. KARR, 


ing young singers on our local 
cabaret circuit is that they make 
it without the tricks of their 
trade, like the flashing strip 
lights that instruct you when to 
clap for Surely. Local kids rise 
or fall on talent alone. 

After Fanny’s closed, I look¬ 
ed around to see where I could 
indulge my enthusiasm for cab¬ 
aret. Joe Ellis has been forced to 
close 132 Bush, a sad event. If 
ever a fellow deserved to run a 
club, it’s Joe. He’ll resurface, I 
hope, and meanwhile there are 
several new clubs. 

Barbara Daitch and Brooke 
Hazard are running the gargan¬ 
tuan complex called Marne’s 
Palazzo, with a huge showroom, 
and Terry Buckley, with the 
capable guidance of Gary Men- 
ger, has returned nightly cabaret 
to the lovingly intimate Buck¬ 
ley’s. Ragg’s offers an occa¬ 
sional show, the Baybrick Inn 
always has live music, and The 
Valencia Rose, of course, offers 
a tumultuous tide of events. 

As the newest, Marne’s and 
Buckley’s intrigued me. Despite 
an ostensible commitment, 
Marne’s has done nothing in 
several months to warm their 
sepulchral room or confine the 
echoing sound. Curtains over 



us pause to ponder song lyrics 
about auras, vibrations, and 
reincarnation, and ultimately 
causes us to embrace her three- 
step hoofing as the entire career 
of Chita Rivera. With this sort 
of sincerity she should be selling 
Reagan on disarmament. 

I relished two particular 
moments. In an embarrassing 
(and inherently racist) nod to the 
Black infusion of Broadway, 
Surely enthused, “Dolly went 
Black coming down her stair¬ 
case.” Won’t Carol Channing be 
surprised when she finds out. 

Then there’s the remarkable 
tale of Surely’s meeting a Perfect 
Master high in the Himalayas. 
He answers her Eternal Ques¬ 
tions with an astounding coup, 
delivering philosophical profun¬ 
dity in pure ^how-biz terms. 
Some smart cookie, that Surely. 

If the best dollar value, wow- 
a-minute show in town is After 
Dark, Surety’s show is a 
celebration for her fans. She’s a 
unique and satisfying star who 
can even use time-worn Broad¬ 
way blitz to raise consciousness. 
How can there be any sin in 
sincere? 

YOU EITHER GOT IT . . . 

One of the pleasures of catch- 


some of the clashing decor 
would help, aesthetically and 
acoustically. A platform stage 
would benefit sight lines, and 
better speakers would burnish 
voices. 

Still, it’s a popular and fun 
spot, where even the largest 
crowds are accommodated gra¬ 
ciously by the owners. They’ve 
played lavish host to benefits 
and welcome performers from 
first-timers to Morgana King. 
With some improvement, this 
could be San Francisco’s pre¬ 
miere showroom. 

Buckley’s, on the other hand, 
is a fraction of the size, and 
lovable for the intimacy it af¬ 
fords the art of popular song. 
Tables have been removed to 
make way for a stage, placed 
handsomely in a mirrored 
alcove, and the sound system 
compliments its artists. It’s 
choice for comfort, intimacy, 
and attention to detail. 

Reginald McDonald was at 
Marne’s recently. He’s been 
highly lauded, and has a melt- 
ingly beautiful voice. It’s a Nat 
Cole smoothy, and his earlier 
repertoire of ballads swept many 
a listener away. The handsome 
young singer is branching out 
now, and that’s causing some 


problems because his lanquid 
approach doesn’t always match 
the demands of the jazzier, 
uptempo numbers. His taste in 
songs is superb, including infre¬ 
quently heard gems like “I’m 
Beginning to See the Light,” 
“I’ll Tell the Man in the Street,” 
and a raft of Arlen tunes (his 
Broadway blues, “Paris Is a 
Lonely Town” has the hysterical 
Harburg rhyme of Utrillo and 
willow), plus contemporary 
ballads. McDonald’s musicali- 
ty is in its apprentice years, 
though, with awkward phrasing 
and scattershot breathing frag¬ 
menting a song’s line. With his 
pleasing stage presence and nif¬ 
ty song-bag he’s enjoyable. 
When his sincerity and pretty 
voice are augmented with a ma¬ 
turing musicianship, he could be 
an artist of stature. 


Ralph Michaels is a Daddy 
of a crooner who appears reg¬ 
ularly at Buckley’s. Some years 
older than McDonald, Michaels 
trades on his maturity. There 
isn’t another singer in town bet¬ 
ter suited to huskily command 
“Come to poppa, come to pop¬ 
pa, do.” I loved his vocal re¬ 
semblance to Johnnie Ray, and 
then he pulled out a handful of 
Ray’s tunes — cause for rejoic¬ 
ing. He loves “those hurtin’” 
country tunes of Connie Francis 
and Patsy Cline, and picks some 
good show tunes as well. He has 
a slightly annoying country- 
western habit of dropping off the 
pitch and scooping back up, 
usually off tune, but I just love 
a big man with a velvet voice. 
Michaels, without pretension or 
an attempt to “sell it,” offers a 
casual parade of caressing tunes. 


NOTES 

Dennis Parker is a refreshing¬ 
ly creative jazzy number with a 
novel voice. More on him soon. 

Kevin Ross is moving to Los 
Angeles. I’m sorry he’s going. I 
always wanted to marry him as 
much as hear him sing, but his 
career beckons. 

And I’ll be dispensing delu¬ 
sions myself Nov. 7 at Buckley’s 
with a one-night return of For¬ 
gotten Baubles of Broadway 
— showtunes you’ve never 
heard, from 1900 through 
Baby. 

Robert Gluck has begun 
another series of Gay writer’s 
workshops. They’re free and 
meet each Tuesday. Call Small 
Press Traffic for details. ■ 


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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 31 































FILM CLIPS 


Crimes of 
Passion 

What We Do For Love 

Ken Russell, enfant terrible of 
the cinema, has created a film 
that will upset a lot of people. It 
deals unflinchingly and uncom¬ 
promisingly with American sex¬ 
ual hangups, a subject we love 
to talk about so long as nothing 
is said. It’s raunchy in its depic¬ 
tions, but examines truths about 
sex few people are willing to con¬ 
front. It’s also dazzling enter¬ 
tainment as only Russell, with 
all his artistic excesses, could 
have dared to make. 

Kathleen Turner is a dress 
designer by day and an eager 
hooker named China Blue by 
night. She seeks thrills and pro¬ 
vides pleasure to men whose sex¬ 
ual needs would otherwise go 
unfulfilled. 

Anthony Perkins is a freaked 
out “minister” who’s trying to 
bring her salvation. He’s a 
weirdo — a guilt-ridden, ob¬ 
sessed man who makes Norman 
Bates look like a Boy Scout. 
He’s a hypocrite who longs for 
sex but is repulsed by it as well. 

John Laughlin is a married 
man with a frigid wife and two 
children who, on a moonlighting 
detective job, discovers China 
Blue has just as many secrets as 
her daytime alter ego. 

Loaded with locker room one- 
liners and keen observations 
about how Americans view and 
handle sex. Crimes of Passion 
deals with how we confuse sex 
with love and vice versa, and the 
numerous ways we fool our¬ 
selves into thinking promiscuity, 
tricking, impersonal affairs, and 
even marriage is an escape from 
the emotional pain that comes 
with commitment and love. 

Turner is staggering in her 
multi-textured portrayal. As 


China Blue, with a flamboyant 
Hans Brinker blonde wig with 
bangs and outrageously cheap 
outfits and voice to match, she 
is at once hilarious yet mesmer¬ 
izing. She might be getting her 
kicks, but she’s also a street 
therapist who has just the cos¬ 
tume and posed attitude to sat¬ 
isfy her varied johns’ requests. 

Perkins carries around a port¬ 
able pulpit and a medical bag 
filled with sexual toys. He wants 
to be redeemed from the lust in 
his heart and the guilt in his 
mind. China Blue is the woman 
he projects his hangups on be¬ 
cause he doesn’t want to save her 
so much as he wants to be her. 
One of his “toys” is a pointed 
stainless steel vibrator that is 
razor sharp. As he gets more and 
more crazed, our knowledge of 
this insidious little gizmo and 
what he might do with it keeps 
us wound up in gritty tension. 

Laughlin, who’s a smooth¬ 
muscled beauty with a face 
that’s in the Christopher Reeve 
mold, represents the average 
American married guy who falls 
for China Blue, not because of 
what she offers but because of 
what she gives emotionally. 
There are certainly visual and 
audio cues/clues a sex partner 
communicates that makes you 
aware they are the one. 
Laughlin and Turner com¬ 
municate this to us as well. 

The photography is sensuous 
and rapturous, and the most 
controlled of any Ken Russell 
film. The music, by Rick Wake- 
man, is sort of Mahler meets 
Moroder, and it works splendid¬ 
ly to evoke the proper moods. 

Crimes of Passion is not a 
masterpiece per se, but a piece 
of master filmmaking which you 
will either love or hate. There 
will be no middle ground. ■ 

{Alhambra/ 

Serramonte) M. Lasky 


American 

Dreamer 

Romancing the (Gem) Stone 

Perhaps the phenomenal success of 
Romancing the Stone means we can 
expect numerous ripoffs, takeoffs, and 
sendups of the comedy-suspense- 
romance genre it created. American 
Dreamer takes the genre and even 
steals some of the cinematic style of 
Romancing the Stone. It still stands 
alone as an unexpectedly delightful 
film that not only keeps the suspense 
it starts with, but maintains the smile 
it puts on your face until the very end. 

Bored, upper middle class housewife 
Jobeth Williams enters a romance 
novel contest and wins a trip to Paris 
for two. Her fuddy-duddy husband, 
James Staley, pooh-poohs the idea as 
irresponsible, but Williams sets off for 
her week’s prize and ends up living the 
very story she created to win the 
contest. 

An auto accident gives her a conve¬ 
nient amnesia attack wherein she 
assumes the identity of the fictional 
character of the espionage romance 
novels penned by Coral Browne, 
whose makeup makes her look like the 
Great Coral Reef. 

W illiams is completely disarming as 
the heroine, Rebecca Ryan, as she 
takes over the real life of the character’s 
actual ghostwriter, Tom Conti, and in¬ 
volves diplomat Giancarlo Giannini in 
her “is it real or is it Memorex” fan¬ 
tasy come to life. 

Conti has that huggable teddy bear 
quality and a woebegone “I can’t be¬ 
lieve this is happening to me” expres¬ 
sion that makes you want to embrace 
him right off the screen. 

The misadventures of Williams and 
Conti are done with a cheeky tongue- 


The Razor's Edge 

Not Too Sharp 

With stilted dialogue that sounds 
like lines from Saturday Night Dead 
and a panoply of cinematic cliches, Bill 
Murray’s version of The Razor’s 
Edge is definitely not the Maugham 
the merrier. 

As Murray himself says in the press 
kit, “Very often, notions of idealism, 
spirituality, and self-awareness are 
relatively intangible.” Murray’s focus 
on the main character, Larry Darrell, 
has him as a jocular, irreverent guy in 
1920s dress and 1980s demeanor. 
There is something so askew in his 
characterization, and in the way the 
screenplay trivializes the other roles, 


The Little 
Drummer Girl 

Spy Movie to Beat 

The Little Drummer Girl is a spy 
drama which is incoherent, cliche- 
ridden, and often downright silly but, 
thanks largely to Diane Keaton’s per¬ 
formance, may become one of my all- 
time favorites. 

Keaton is Charlie, an American 
actress who lives in London and plays 
all the leads for a third-rate English 
repertory company. Does British 
Equity know about this? An inactive 
activist, she’s recruited by Israeli ter¬ 
rorists for a pivotal role in their plot 
to kill a Palestinian leader. They say 

Firstborn 

Life Without Father 

Firstborn might have been called 
Against All Odds because that’s how 
this melodrama succeeds. 

Will Jake (Christopher Collet) be 
able to convince his mother (Teri Garr) 
that her lover, Sam (Peter Weller), is 
“an asshole ... a deadbeat, a loser, 
and a bullshitter”? Will little brother 
Brian (Corey Haim) be thrown out of 
school for fighting? Will the kids run 
away from home or stay and struggle 
to preserve their family? 

Movies that pose questions like these 
often lead audiences to ask one of their 
own: Who cares? But the acting, direc¬ 
tion (Michael Apted) and most of the 
writing in Firstborn are first-rate, able 
to transcend melodrama long enough 
to get such a grip on us that we accept 


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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 PAGE 32 


REVIEWS BY MICHAEL LASKY AND STEVE WARREN 



Jobeth Williams lives it up in American Dreamer. 


in-cheek and at an irresistible brisk 
pace which even the somewhat sappy 
ending can’t mar. 

Director Rick Rosenthal has created 


a style of filmmaking we haven’t seen 
since the 1940s. He makes us glad it’s 
back. ■ 

(Alexandria) M. Lasky 


that you are constantly aware you are 
watching actors in a movie. 

Murray is to marry rich bitch 
Catherine Hicks, but WWI comes 
along to change his total view of the 
world. When he returns from the front 
he decides he must find himself, can¬ 
cels the marriage and the promised 
stockbroker job, and goes off to Paris. 

Then, as all people who are search¬ 
ing for the secret of life do, he goes to 
the highest mountains of India, the 
deepest coal mine, and a fish packing 
house. 

The film crosscuts back to the not 
so pleasant life of his friends in pre- and 
post-Depression America, and covers 
them so superficially they seem mere¬ 
ly set-ups for Murray’s preening. 


she is “bright, creative, underused, 
romantic . . . everything we want.” 
She’s also pro-Palestinian, but that 
doesn’t deter them. 

The recruiting officer is hunky 
Greek actor Yorgo Voyagis, who de¬ 
scribes his scarred body as “a map of 
the Middle East.” If The Little 
Drummer Girl proves anything about 
the Mideast situation, it’s that there 
are gorgeous men on both sides. One 
of the Israelis is played by Jonathan 
Sagalle, who starred in Israel’s first 
Gay film, Drifting. 

Having used sex as a Jure, the Is¬ 
raelis don’t worry that Charlie, who 
borders on nymphomania, might 
change allegiance when they send her 
to infiltrate a Palestinian training 
camp. I don’t know about John Le 


The cinematography relies on pre¬ 
tentious shots like artsy silhouettes of 
war-ravaged landscapes, wall calendar 
images of the Himalayas, and many 
other obviously emotive scenes not 
worth a thousand words. Heightening 
this silliness is a soupy and shrill sound¬ 
track which cues us to note that some¬ 
thing profound has just occurred. 

Theresa Russell is stunning, physi¬ 
cally and emotionally, as the doomed 
Sophie, but the script gives her char¬ 
acter little choice. Denholm Elliot as 
the idle rich Uncle Elliot is without 
purpose, unlike the novel. So what we 
are left with is a fractured adaptation 
of a magnificent novel. 

The only thing this Razor’s Edge 
cuts is the cheese. ■ 

(Northpoint) M. Lasky 


Carre’s novel, but the screenplay cops 
out by not having Charlie kill anyone, 
and by tacking on a phony romantic 
ending. 

The Little Drummer Girl is more 
violent than other filmed Le Carre 
works, The Spy Who Came in From 
the Cold, etc., but not designed for 
action fans. There’s also surprisingly 
little suspense, except in two brief 
scenes. 

For all its flaws, the film is con¬ 
sistently absorbing and extremely en¬ 
tertaining. Charlie comments early on 
that actors “have no center,” but 
Keaton provides The Little Drum¬ 
mer Girl with a center around which 
the other well-produced elements fit 
neatly if untidily into place. ■ 

(Galaxy) 5. Warren 


whatever happens. The plot has blown 
in our psychic ear and we’ll follow it 
anywhere. 

Collet, who played the hustler in 
Torch Song Trilogy during its run 
here, is a red-haired Robby Benson 
type, more sensitive than macho even 
though his 15-year-old character plays 
Lacrosse and has a girlfriend. Garr, an 


actress who evokes strong empathy, 
should move a few notches closer to 
Meryl Streep on Hollywood’s “most 
wanted” list with this performance. 
Weller, atoning for Buckaroo Banzai, 
conveys menace brilliantly as Sam’s 
dark side is gradually revealed, recall¬ 
ing Richard Widmark at his meanest. 

■ 

(Regency 2) ’ S. Warren 


One Night Stands 

Films of Gay Interest This Coming Week 

by Michael Benzry 

Saturday, October 27: (Strand) 
Costume rock opera late show for 
Halloween. Rocky Horror Picture 
Show. Do the time warp again with the 
sweet transvestite from the transsex¬ 


ual galaxy Transylvania who’s mak¬ 
ing a man in the lab. Phantom of the 
Opera. Paul Williams’ modem Faust. 
Tuesday- Wednesday, October 30-31: 
(Castro) Alfred Hitchcock directs. 
Strangers on a Train. Two men meet 
on a train and arrange to kill each 
other’s wives. Gay overtones in the 
murderous relationship add tension to 
the film. With Dial M for Murder. 
Lots of twists as Ray Milland tries to 
do in his wife, Grace Kelly. ■ 






























Sports & fitnesS 


FITNESS EIGHTIES 


DM TUNER 

One of the First People With AIDS 
Comes Out on Fitness 

by Paul Trefzger 

D an Turner has AIDS. He is also into fitness. He’s an activist. 
He has spoken about AIDS at rallies, done public service an¬ 
nouncements, and most notably, he was featured in KICU’s 
(Channel 36) documentary, AIDS: Facts, Fears, and Feelings. 
He’s also great looking, and I was anxious to meet him when he 
agreed to be interviewed. We spoke over Mexican food at the Line- 
Up. I mentioned that in this series of fitness articles it seemed there 
were some predominating reasons for the increasing interest in 
health and gyms. Feeling good was one, having a nice body 
another, but also that this was a good defense against AIDS. 

“It’s a mistake to think that going to the gym will prevent 
AIDS,” Turner said. “Yes, it’s a good idea, along with good eating 
habits and rest, to exercise, but it’s imperative as far as preven¬ 
tion for you to practice safe sex.” Dan emphasized this repeatedly. 



Dan Turner using free weights in his back yard. (Photo: Rink) 


“It's a mistaken notion that 
just working out and/or having 
a nice body will prevent AIDS,” 
Turner continued. “There are 
models who have it. Having a 
well-built body does not mean 
that you’re healthy. It does 
make sense to assume that most 
people who go to the gym are 
health-conscious and have add¬ 
ed resources to take care of 
themselves, but then I was go¬ 
ing to the gym before and after 
diagnosis and it had nothing to 
do with it. 

“Two things I’d like to get 
across,” he said. “One, it’s very 
important to take care of your¬ 
self. I mean eating three meals 
a day, resting — actually relax¬ 
ing, knowing how to relax. 
Everybody has stress. Some 
people aren’t aware of it. There 
are ways of reducing stress. 
Once you’ve been exposed to 
some of the ways of recognizing 
and reducing stress, you’ll be 
able to identify those times when 
you sense it coming on and you 
can have control over it. Two, 
exercise. Try to develop some 
kind of consistent exercise pro¬ 
gram to keep the blood flowing. 
Cardiovascular exercise such as 
running, swimming, and aero¬ 
bics are great for circulation. 


You don’t have to take a lot of 
time each day. You can take fif¬ 
teen minutes in your home. I 
recommend a gym because 
you’re more likely to be commit¬ 
ted. A lot of people say, ‘I don’t 
have time.’ That’s just an ex¬ 
cuse. Fifteen minutes of exercise 
and fifteen minutes of medita¬ 
tion for relaxation is as impor¬ 
tant to a person’s schedule as, 
say, brushing your teeth. It 
should become habitual — a 
part of your daily routine. 

“In my case, they told me, 
‘Do what you feel like. Don’t 
overdo.’ It’s a good idea for 
anyone getting into exercise to 
build up to it slowly. I usually 
exercise an hour before I eat. 
Then it ‘goes to the right places. ’ 
At home with barbells at 125 
lbs., I do presses, curls, and 
pull-ups — four to five sets of 
reps a day. When I go to the 
gym, which lately has been once 
or twice a week, I work my 
whole body. I know I should be 
going three times a week. I try 
to run as often as I can, around 
the neighborhood or at the 
beach.” Dan said he runs just 
short of exhaustion and it’s what 
he called a “comfortable” run. 

“I usually run about fiteen 


PAUL TREFZGER 

minutes twice a week,” he said. 
“I don’t feel that’s enough 
either. In the gym I do a regular 
Nautilus workout with a con¬ 
certed focus on legs. I warm up 
with free weights. I use dumb¬ 
bells for arms. I’m in the gym 
for about an hour and a half, an 
hour ‘on the floor.’ Again, exer¬ 
cise, eating well, relaxation will 
help you, but you’ve got to prac¬ 
tice safe sex. Health will help 
you, but there’s no guarantee. 
Of course, things like smoking, 
drinking, bad eating habits 
won’t help you. To the con¬ 
trary.” 

“In February of 1982 I was 
one of the first AIDS cases in the 
city when I was diagnosed as 
having KS (Kaposi’s sarcoma),” 
he said. “In July of ’81, UC 
Medical Center had established 
the KS Clinic. When the medi¬ 
cal professon here became aware 
that there were people getting 
diseases young men usually 
don’t get and that these men 
were Gay, they started calling it 
GRID (Gay Related Immune 
Deficiency). In six months they 
were calling it AIDS. On March 
7,19821 became the second pa¬ 
tient at San Francisco General 
Hospital with AIDS. 1 was in 
chemotherapy for three months. 
People were then, as now, just 
treating the symptoms. In Au¬ 
gust of ’82 I was one of the first 
ten on Interferon, and I’m on it 
today. Instead of five days every 
other week, however, it’s every 
third week and it’s self-injected. 
I combine traditional and ex¬ 
perimental treatment. I started 
acupuncture at SFGH. I take 
vitamins, multi-vitamins, and 
also vitamin C in doses of twelve 
grams. The acupuncture re¬ 
duces stress and stimulates the 
immune system. My diet is the 
diet anyone interested in staying 
healthy should have: carbohy¬ 
drates, protein, vegetables, 
grains, cooked cereal, dairy 
products, fruit, fish, and 
chicken. I avoid red meat. 

“My AIDS is KS, remember, 
which is cancer, not pneumonia, 
and it’s been easier to deal with 
from the beginning. I believe 
that if you watch it early, you 
can keep it at bay. I came out as 
an activist almost immediately. 

I felt that if I came out with it 
that other people would and that 
would be good for them. My 
friends and I knew that,I wasn’t 
doing anything unusual. Also, 
the activism was for ‘myself. ’ It 
was therapeutic. I became active 
with People With AIDS, San 
Francisco. This organization 
now, I happen to know, is try¬ 
ing with little success to work 
out a program with the gyms, 
particularly the Castro gyms, for 
some sort of arrangement so that 
people with AIDS can use the 
facilities on some sort of regular 
basis, hopefully with a dis¬ 
counted rate because of their 
strained financial status.” 

Dan continued to explain how 
Eastern philosophies influence 
his activism. 

“The Japanese believe cancer 
to be toxins in the body to be 
eliminated,” he said. “ ‘Keep the 
flow going.’ It’s part physical, 
mental, and spiritual. You’re 
encouraged not to hold feelings 
inside. I was encouraged to 
speak and to write and to ‘re¬ 
lease’ in such ways. Cancer is 
considered stagnation. The 
theory was to turn fear away 
(Continued on next page) 


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THURSDAYNBL 


TGWEDNESDAYNBL 


ROBERT E.JAHNIGEN 


JERRY R. DE YOUNG 


Fifth Week Conclusion 


Something’s Missing 


The Tavern Guild Thursday 
Night Bowling League conclud¬ 
ed its fifth week of play with four 
teams sweeping their opponents. 
Schmidt Insurance, led by 
Kevin Keefer’s 478 series, de¬ 
feated the Four Little Pigs, 
jumping from 7th place to 4th 
place. Ed Burnett’s 456 just 
wasn’t enough for the Pigs. 
However, the greatest jump was 
made by defending champion 

Queen Mary’s Pub, which 
vaulted from 12th place to 5th 
place by virtue of its sweep from 
Park Bowl. Billy Wood and 
Charlie paced QMP with 480 
and 477 series, respectively, 
while Ed Barido led Park Bowl 
with a 496. Trax Maniax skip¬ 
ped up to 13th place by means 
of its sweep over The Special as 
Rich Krietsch led Trax with a 
483 while Leon Archibald led 
The Special attack with a 421 
series. Trax Team #1 also im¬ 
proved two positions as a result 
of its sweep over CDC. Dwayne 
Thomas (402) led Trax, while 
Kevin Hurd paced CDC with a 
441. 

League leader Ron’s Records 
continued its hold on first place, 
taking three out of four from sec¬ 


ond place Bracco Distributing. 
Ron’s was paced by Roger Rig- 
ney (531), while Bracco’s Roger 
Spencer had a 514. Robert 
Dorn’s 584 series (including 228 
and 193 games) led The Krewe 
to its three-game win over 
EJESP. Randy Tirri’s 561 

series (including a 205 game) 
just wasn’t enough to keep pace 
for EJESP. The Floppy Discs, 
having to overcome a. 146-pin 
handicap to Febe’s, still man¬ 
aged to take three out of four 
games. Greg Hullinger led the 
Floppies with a 559 series (in¬ 
cluding a 203 game) while Don 

Penniman led Febe’s with a 433. 
The White Horse Cafe jumped 
into 2nd place with three wins 
over Four Play. Doug Griggs’ 
475 led the winners, while Bob 
Heinrich had a 475 in a losing 
effort. The Pig Pins and The 
Four Keeps, both evenly match¬ 
ed, split for the evening. Glen 
Terrio’s 489 paced the Four 
Keeps, while Dan Perez led the 
Pig Pins with a 406 series. 

Action continues tonight with 
several key matches. Ron’s 
Records (15-5) clashes with 
Queen Mary (12-8), while 
Schmidt Insurance (13-7) takes 
on the Little Pigs (11-9). ■ 


What are all those numbers 
without names doing in the 
Monday & Thursday Leagues’ 
team standings? Are they 
waiting for sponsors, or simply 
unable to think of a catchy 
name, or both? With all those 
sharp businessmen out there, it 
seems incredible that such an ex¬ 
cellent opportunity to advertise 
at such reasonable rates, as is 
provided by sponsoring a team 
in a Tavern Guild Bowling 
League, would be ignored. 

Speaking of ignored, have you 
read the first edition of the Inter- 
League Lime Light ? What, you 
haven’t even heard of it? Well, 
that’s not too surprising, seeing 
as how it has been published on¬ 
ly once. If you would care to see 
what type of periodical it is 
though, just ask your captain. 
He was given a copy to share 
with his team members. The 
number of copies available, due 
to limited finances, were re¬ 
stricted to one for each team of 
the three Tavern Guild Leagues. 
The next distribution will be the 
first week of November. Anyone 
having some bowling news, 


juicy gossip, or personal expose 
he would like to have appear in 
the November edition, please 
contact the Wednesday League 
Secretary, Jerry De Young, be¬ 
fore Nov. 1, 1984. 

Now, for our mutual passion, 
to give each Tavern Guild 
League an idea of what’s hap¬ 
pening in the other two, here are 
the highest 200+ scratch games 
bowled in each league as of the 
dates indicated in the Score- 
board. 

• TGWBL-RobMallin (Pilsner 
Potlickers)-255. 

• TGTBL-Roger Rigney (Ron 
Records )-247. 

• TGMBL-Aubrey Palmer 
(Eagle Crk. Midtwn Boys)-235. 

You know, it’s obvious that 
games over 200 are becoming 
more and more, if you’ll pardon 
the expression, common in the 
Tavern Guild Leagues. Some¬ 
thing that may not be quite so 
obvious, though, is that the odds 
of realizing a perfect game also 
improve with each new 200+ 
level. Judging from the above 
three achievements, it won’t be 


too long before a 300 game 
becomes a reality, and indica¬ 
tions are that it’s about as likely 
to happen in one Tavern Guild 
League as in the other. 

In closing, let me remind all 
scorekeepers to be sure to record 
the correct score beside the cor¬ 
rect name if you have two or 
more bowlers on your team with 
the same first name. So far, in 
only three weeks, scores and 
names have been crossed on two 
occasions, and this has caused 
confusion in two separate sets of 
records. May I suggest, hence¬ 
forth, if your team is experienc¬ 
ing this situation, extra care be 
taken regarding beside whose 
name to record the figures. This 
extra effort on your part will free 
your secretary from the drudg¬ 
ery of making extensive record 
modifications. This time can 
then be applied toward more 
positive pursuits, like keeping 
the other teams’ records up-to- 
date. ■ 


SCOREBOARD 


PARK BOWL TAVERN GUILD LEAGUES 


G.S.L. UPDATE 


Would You Like to Coach 
A Softball Team? 


You won’t make $200,000 a 
year, but I guarantee you will 
have a great time with your 
team. 

If you are interested in 
coaching a team in the Gay Soft- 
ball League now is the time, be¬ 
cause there are several openings 
for the 1985 season. By contact¬ 
ing Commissioner Rick Brattin 
at 647-3825, he will put you in 
touch with a sponsor seeking a 
coach. 

If Rick is not available, 
James, his roommate, will be 
happy to help you. Other tele¬ 
phone contact numbers are 775- 
4037 and 753-0740. 

We are not looking for 
“Woody Hayes type” coaches, 
but coaches who enjoy being 


around trim, good-looking, sexy 
men and women. That should 
pique some interest. Give us a 
call. You won’t regret it. 

Fall season enters its fourth 
weekend this Sunday with 
games at Jackson Field, 17th 
Street and Arkansas. Everyone 
gets into play because it’s a sort 
of open call for ballplayers. By 
the way, where are the women 
on these Sundays? Only Kerry 
from the Phone Booth has 
shown up, and she’s looking for 
a little company. 

Don’t forget the next league 
meeting at Chaps, 37511th St., 
starting at 12 noon. You do not 
have to be a member of the GSL 
to attend, only to vote. ■ 


TG MONDAY LEAGUE 
(Week 2 of 25 - as of 10/15/84 
League Average: 709 


1. Grand Central Sta. 7 1 

2. Top Billing 7 1 

3. San Francisco Gym 7 1 

4. Deluxe Pickups 7 1 

5. Gays of Our Lives 6 2 

6. Pilsner Pickups 6 2 

7. Welcome Home 5 3 

8. Renegade 4 4 

9. Team #10 4 4 

10. Team #8 4 4 

11. G. Kelly Drvg Acad 4 4 

12. Men’s Room 3 5 

13. Community Rentals 3 5 

14. Amazing Six Graces 3 5 


15. Eagle Crk Mdtwn Boys 2 6 

16. Ethel Mertz Memorial 2 6 


17. MTH 1 7 

18. Pendulum 0 4 

19. Perfect Petals 0 8 

20. Team #6 0 8 


TG WEDNESDAY LEAGUE 
(Week 3 of 22 - as of 10/17/84) 
League Average 733 

1. Pendulum 11 1 


Think the Unthinkable. 



Then do the do-able. 


The unthinkable is the rejection and isolation that can 
accompany a diagnosis of AIDS. The do-able is a little 
time and concern from all of us. 

Shanti volunteers provide emotional and practical 
support for people with AIDS and their loved ones. 
Volunteers needed now. Call for more information. 



Shanti Project 

Affection not Rejection 
558-9644 


TEAM STANDINGS 


2. Park Bowl 8 4 

3. Plsnr Pntless Sisters 8 4 

4. Pilsner II 8 4 

5. Animals 7 5 

6. Pendulum Pieces 7 5 

7. Cafe San Marcos 7 5 

8. Pilsner Potlickers 6 6 

9. S.S. Tooth Fairies 6 6 

10. Grady’s 6 6 

11. Ram’s Head Bar 6 6 

12. Can We Bowl? 6 6 

13. Sweet Inspiration 6 6 

14. S.F. Eagle 5V& 6.(4 

15. Pilsner tt\ 5 7 

16. Scenic Hyway Tours 5 7 

17. Pilsner Sleaze Balls 4 8 

18. DK’s Unmntnbls 4 8 

19. Team H22 4 8 

20. PWIL/Japan town 3 9 

21. Play With It, Ltd. 2i/ 2 9(4 

22. Pilsner Penguinettes 2 6 


TG THURSDAY LEAGUE 
(Week 5 of 30 - as of 10/18/84 
League Average: 531 


1. Ron’s Records 

15 

5 

2. White Horse 

13 

7 

3. Schmidt Insurance 

13 

7 

4. Floppy Disks 

12 

8 

5. Queen Mary Pub 

12 

8 

6. Bracco Dist. 

11 

9 

7. Four Play 

11 

7 

8. 4 Little Pigs 

11 

9 

9. Pig Pins 

11 

9 

10. Four Keeps 

11 

9 

11. Febe’s 

11 

9 

12. The Krewe 

9 

11 

13. Trax Maniacs 

9 

11 

14. E.J.E.S.P. 

8 

12 

15. Park Bowl 

8 

12 

16. Trax 

7 

13 

17. The Special 

6 

14 

18. CDC 

4 

16 


Bowling scores compiled by Jerry 
R. De Young. 


SFPA SCOREBOARD 

TEAM STANDINGS and PERSONAL ACHIEVEMENTS 


DIVISION ONE 



Brig Guards 

46- 98 

.319 

Stallion International 

90- 

38 

.703 

Maud’s Squad 

42-102 

.291 

DeLuxe Spare Tires 

100- 

44 

.694 




F ebe’s Snow 

83- 

61 

.576 

TOP TWENTY 


Macante’s MARTYRS 71- 

57 

.554 

1. Bill Kazee 

18- 2 

.900 

Ramrod Riders 

64- 

63 

.503 

2. Dave Chua 

25- 4 

.862 

Bear Shots 

60- 

67 

.472 

3. E.Z. 

22- 4 

.846 

Chaps Sticks 

56- 

72 

.437 

4. Rick Moore 

23- 5 

.821 

Maud’s 

53- 

75 

.414 

5. Colin Bradley 

18- 5 

.782 

Pilsner Doughboys 

53- 

75 

.414 

6. Dean Lechner 

23- 7 

.766 

Pendulum Panthers 

46- 

82 

.359 

Ray Peterson 

23- 7 

.766 

Transfer Fast Passes 

46- 

82 

.359 

8. Jim Tingle 

14- 5 

.736 





9. Dennis Hall 

22- 8 

.733 

DIVISION TWO 



10. Charles Dossett 

16- 6 

.727 

F ebe’s 

97- 

47 

.673 

11. Gene Miller 

23- 9 

.718 

Chaps Outlaws 

96- 

48 

.666 

12. Allen Buholtz 

22- 9 

.709 

Eagle Creek Chaos 

94- 

50 

.652 

13. Sam Bridgers 

19- 8 

.703 

Stallion Nightmares 

86- 

58 

.597 

14. Bill Von Prillwitz 

21- 9 

.700 

Transfer Tigers 

85- 

59 

.590 

15. Nick Maheras 

25-11 

.694 

Pilsner Ltd. 

76- 

68 

.527 

16. Ron McKay 

24-11 

.685 

Pendulum Pirates 

71- 

73 

.493 

17. Chuck Lanier 

23-11 

.676 

Ramrod Rascals 

66- 

78 

.458 

18. Barry White 

24-12 

.666 

Guantes de Macantes 

56- 

88 

.458 

19. Pierre Aguilar 

22-11 

.666 

Bear Claws 

49- 

95 

.340 

20. Dave Timko 

20-10 

.666 

■ 


FITNESS 80 s 

(Continued from previous page) 
from myself — the fear of dying 
— to ‘let go’ of the fear. I felt it 
did more good to help other peo¬ 
ple. If you let it get to you, it can 
eat you up. So I ‘direct it away’ 
and treat it as something outside 
of me instead of inside. I don’t 
want to be simplistic. It is a real 
virus. But the secret is how you 
react. Are you going to control 
it or is it going to control you? 
Now, I hope that this doesn’t 


come out wrong. There have 
been some really positive people 
— activists — who have died 
anyway. And they’re not to 
blame. 

“One thing that I apprecciate 
is that I’ve learned to live in the 
present. You become more con¬ 
scious. You become more aware 
of the present, and the quality of 
your life improves.” 

Dan Turner is certainly an ex¬ 
ample. B 

P. Trefzger 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 34 
























MR. MARCUS 


NEXT EVENT: MEN BEHIND BARS II-VICTORIA THEATRE-FEB. 17-18,1985 


PAGE 35 


BAY AREA REPORTER 


OCTOBER 25, 1984 


B.a.r. bazaaR 


Something for Everyone. This lovely androgyne — male on the left, female 
on the right — was seen last Sunday at the Beaux Arts Ball. He/she won, 
too. Did the judges award two prizes? (Photo: R. Pruzan) 


FEATURING: 

A NIGHT OF NON-STOP DANCE CLASSICS 

By DJs: 

LARRY CORY-SAN FRANCISCO 
HENRY WINSLOW-NEW YORK 


A MEN BEHIND BARS PRODUCTION 

In Association with PATS 

PRODUCERS: 

MARK ABRAMSON & JIM CVITANICH 


GRAPHIC DESIGN: 

JOE JOHNS 


SOUND & LIGHTS: 

M&M TECHNICAL PRODUCTIONS 


Free Shuttle Bus Service 

Parking on the pier 

1 block from Powell/Taylor Cable Car 


INFORMATION HOTLINE: 821-3637 


B londes are in! Last Sunday, 
Dean Gibson, sporting a 
beautiful chrome chest plate 
harness, entered the wonderful 
world of leather stardom when 
it was announced by Daddy ’84 
Christian Heran that Dean had 
been elected Daddy’s Boy II at 
the SF Eagle for the SF AIDS 
Fund. The 18 contestants, auc¬ 
tion items, donations, and votes 
all added up to $11,400 for the 
coffers of the AIDS brotherhood 
fund. Needless to say, the 
weatherman cooperated whole¬ 
heartedly for a crisp and sunny 
day in the patio, which was 
bulging at the seams with the 
generous record crowd. Walter 
Mellon and Nick Weiler MC’d 
the event, supported by Alan 
Selby and the show headed by 
Mary Buffet, Mario Simone, 
and the Fourskins. Jane Dor- 
nacker kept the exuberant 
crowd UP throughout the mara¬ 
thon event. Vern Stewart added 
another motorcycle to his toy 
box — boys are too much head¬ 
ache — by purchasing Sonny 
Cline’s bike for $1,750. The 
banjo clock donated by Chuck 
Baumia of the Clock Works in 
Oakland garnered a $250 bid 
and all around, the money was 
flowing into the fund that direct¬ 
ly helps AIDS patients with 
their financial problems. With¬ 
out a doubt, the icons of leather- 
dom Luke Daniel, Ron Moore, 
Colt Thomas, and Sonny Cline 
scored high with the audience, 
and every time porn star A1 
Parker came in view a million 
eyelashes fluttered and hearts 
throbbed in genuine lust. As La 
Kish would say, “Everyone’s 
loins were extremely moist.” 
Donald Sango almost forgot he 
had tickets to the Bruce Spring¬ 
steen concert, he was so enthrall¬ 


ed with Mr. Parker’s — ahem 
— “countenance.” And again, 
kudos to the SF Eagle staff 
under Terry Thompson’s direc¬ 
tion. They picked up the gaunt¬ 
let of the challenge of a packed 
house and pushed out drinks 
WITH pleasurable service and 
always a smile. It was a good, 
but long day, and on behalf of 
EVERYONE who worked on 
this project, I can only say a big 
THANK YOU to everyone for 
attending, but mostly, for show¬ 
ing the community that we can, 
indeed, help ourselves, and we 
do have love for the brothers in 
our community who face such a 
tragic crisis. You were all just 
wonderful. 

Later on that evening, a 
sparse crowd showed up for the 
Tavern Guild’s Beaux Arts Ball. 
A great effort by Mark Friese 
and his committee did not spark 
the community’s enthusiasm, 
but everyone I talked to who had 
attended had no complaints 
about the costumes, the enter¬ 
tainment, or the dance party. 
The ball is not dead by any 
means. Just be prepared for next 
year! 

★ ★ ★ 

Halloween’s not until next 
Wednesday, but the glitz-blitz is 
in full swing already. Last Sat¬ 
urday night, the most macho 
leather queens, gym girls, and 
masculine types converged once 
again for the annual Ballerina 
Ball, an event I’ve never been 
invited to and you know WHY. 
This annual tutti-frutti tryst 
may someday replace the Closet 
Ball. Those who are invited 
usually spend the next few days 
before Halloween with shaved 
chests, no moustaches, trying to 
(Continued on next page) 


* Daddies’ Boys Raise 
$11,400 for AIDS Fund 


The winners of the Daddy’s Boy contest at the Eagle last weekend: (l. to r.) first runner-up Christopher, Jake Banks 
last year’s winner, this year’s winner. Dean Gibson, and Stephen, second runner-up. (Photo: Rink) 


ON THE EVE/SITE OF: 

CMC CARNIVAL ’84 


Pier 45 - Shed C - Base of Fisherman's Wharf 


TICKETS $8.00 

$10.00 at the Door 

Available at Headlines. Mr. S. 

All American Boy. New York Man. 
or your favorite bar. 




































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NOTE: 1808 is a private club for J/O artists and includes the 
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and friendly. 1 808 MARKET STREET 
JACKOFF PARTIES EACH MONDAY 7PM - 11PM 


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! Regular $10 - Use this coupon for $5 off. 


Hrs: 9PM-3AM DAILY; 9PM-4AM FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 


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729 BUSH ST. 781-9468 


Support Your Community 
Make Donor Options To 
UNITED WAY, 
Specify 

PACIFIC CENTER 


This trio of leather titans helped judge the Daddy’s Boy II contest at the SF Eagle last Sunday. The three consecutive 
Mr. International Leather(s) are (l. to r.) Luke Daniel (’82), Colt Thomas (’83), and current titleholder Ron Moore. 
(Photo: R. Pruzan) 



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MARCUS 

(Continued from previous page) 
get the glitter out of their eyes, 
ears, and hair for work on Mon¬ 
day. It’s because of this balle¬ 
rina brawl that the Muscle Sys¬ 
tem Gym has been nicknamed 
the Muscle Sisters. Can you 
imagine George Ash (The 
Trash) in a tutu? And Jim 
Cvitanich and Ms. Peckerhead 
in a flurry of feathers and ballet 
slippers? You got the picture. 
Indeed. 

Anyway, the whole town will 
be celebrating, and South of 
Market is where most of the 
BIG action is taking place. 
Trocadero Transfer swings open 
with its annual Black Party Sat., 
Oct. 27 — this year in THREE/ 
DEE from 10 p.m. ’til Dawn. 
Tickets are $12 in advance or 
$15 at the door. David Bandy’s 
big annual salute at the Galleria 
is definitely a MUST too with 
thou$and$ of dollars in prize 
money for costumes on the same 
night. Don Ramon’s restaurant 
offers cash prizes and dinners 
that same evening. On Hallow¬ 
een night itself, the SF Eagle’s 
annual Leather and Feathers is 
the biggie on the Miracle Mile. 
Over at CHAPS, the Saucy Aus¬ 
sie Kym Whittington says all 
costumes are welcome, with 
$100 for the 1st prize for best 
costume and $50 for the second 
best. Joe Sanders, back in the 
saddle at the RAMROD, will 
host a special Halloween buffet 
all evening with some sizzling 


surprises, and I dare say, it will 
be VERY festive in the macho 
territory. I know you’ll all hate 
yourselves Thursday morning, 
but you only live once. Get out 
and see the wonderful creativity 
generated by this most outrage¬ 
ous Gay celebration. 

FROM THE MERRY 
DISH-MOBILE 

In answer to your many que¬ 
ries, the Gay garage I mentioned 
two weeks ago is NOT the R.L. 
Senter Garage on Folsom. I’ll 
have you know Mr. Senter is a 
friend of the community — 
they’re the guys who keep the 
vehicles running for the Shanti 
Project volunteers and clients — 
and FREE, so stop wondering, 
because I will not tell you the 
garage . . . Late added for Hal¬ 
loween: Dancing and costume 
prize money at the ARENA if 
you want to shake your feathers 
around . . . Speaking of the 
ARENA, the final Bare Chest 
Contest to name Mr. December 
on the 1985 calendar was won 
last week by one of the area’s 
REAL hunks: Bill Robison — 
that calendar will be HOT! — 
and due out in mid-November 
... If you ever have to call Mer¬ 
cury Distributing (the new cata¬ 
log is absolutely terrific), you’ll 
probably get Alex on the line — 
some folks, I hear tell, call him 
Alice in Dildo Land, and he is 
definitely NOT one of the 
models in the new catalog . . . 
David Delay is back in action, 
and has taken over the. respon¬ 


sibilities of the great food at 
’Bush Cafe on the mezzanine 
floor at the AMBUSH — the at¬ 
mosphere seems now to be less 
formal, and a great getaway for 
those intimate moments with 
your current “squeeze” . . . And 
have you noticed how the Castro 
Country florist shop on Castro 
has blossomed out, looking so 
spiffy since Dowager Empress 
II Bella has taken over on the 
sales force? Looks migh-T- 
phyne . . . Last Saturday, some 
of the spiffiest, stiffiest hot dudes 
convened at the 1808 CLUB to 
help Jimmy Miller celebrate his 
40TH. The champagne wasn’t 
the only thing stiff around that 
SAFE-SEX bazaar. You can 
bet, the 1808 CLUB is the 
ONLY action in town these 
days, and the NUMBERS — 
well, you just gotta check it out, 
and there’s a 50% off the mem¬ 
bership fee coupon in this very 
issue of the Bay Area Reporter. 
They say Ringold Alley is be¬ 
coming like Times Square, but 
a SFPD paddy wagon on each 
end of the block is definitely a 
turn-OFF. You’ll love the 1808, 
9, 10 and hooray ... If you’re 
going to be politically correct 
these days, the word is out: It’s 
no longer Drag Queen. They’re 
now called DRESS Queens . . . 
And if you’ve got a penchant for 
outrageous Lesbian humor, 
you’ve got to read the latest issue 
of Pat Califa’s monthly Power 
Exchange Newsleather for Wo¬ 
men. There’s an article this 
month in it, to wit: “A Begin- 
(Continueifl on next page) 



The Dragonslayers, first place group winners at the Beaux Arts Ball last weekend. (Photo: Rink) 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25. 1984 PAGE 36 





































(Continued from previous page) 

ner s Guide to Buying the Politi¬ 
cally Correct Dildo” OR every¬ 
one knows where they go. The 
question is WHAT do they do? 

DISH-CO MANIA 

Congratulations to the 
WATERING HOLE at its spif- 
fy new location on Folsom — 
celebrated its 7th Anniversary 
just this past Monday and Tues¬ 
day. Brian Todd’s got a very 
sharp crew and a disc jockey 
that LISTENS to what his cus¬ 
tomers want and actually plays 
requests . . . The TV stations 
are most positive about the new 
Gay motel for AIDS patients in 
Palm Springs, and only a former 
San Franciscan would think of 
it. Veteran South of Marketeers 
have not forgotten Fred Hardt, 
jovial man about town, bike 
club member, and one of the 


ANYWHERE in ALL Sonoma 
County for this one. Jim Jolly’s 
gown will be a ravishing orange 
and studded with silver pump¬ 
kin seeds, I hear . . . Closer to 
home, that lovable Beau Dod¬ 
son at the SF Eagle will host his 
annual pumpkin carving contest 
too on Monday, Oct. 28, at 
8 p.m. — this one is ALWAYS 
fun, so attack that big gold fruit, 
dudes! If we can’t have UY- 
VARI paintings on every wall, 
let there be Jack-O-Lantern art¬ 
istry. Speaking of Robert Uy- 
vari, strong rumors coming out 
of Wisconsin that he’ll be re¬ 
turning to the Bay Area in the 
not too distant “futch” (that’s a 
Marvin-ism for future). 

★ ★ ★ 

Well, boys and girls (that 
means YOU, Michelle), time to 
wrap this up before my long¬ 
time goombah Tony Lindsey 



. . . there's not a sequin or rhinestone 
to be found anywhere in all Sonoma 
County . . / 


most sincere people you’d ever 
want to meet — he’s the man 
behind the plan down in the 
Springs, and BRAVO! It’s due 
to open in mid-December ... I 
forgot to mention the spellbind¬ 
ing vocal performance of Mario 
Simone, who thrilled the huge 
crowd at Daddy’s Boy last Sun¬ 
day — a song he wrote and sang 
superbly — it brought the house 
down while (he’ll never admit it) 
his other half, Embry Payne, 
was beaming utmostly proud. 
That ever-loving Jon Hedges 
will be producing Mario’s single 
any day now, and it WILL 
probably hit the charts around 
February — watch for it . . . 


has a stroke. For SEVEN long 
years my Tony has gone through 
all this Thursday Torture and 
Trauma and corrected my mis¬ 
spelled words and forked 
diphthongs. He’s held up dead¬ 
lines and nursed my Monday 
hangovers with an expertise Bob 
Ross will find hard to replace. 
In all this time, except when 
Tony was Grand Duchess 
Tanya, he never complained or 
gnashed his teeth (his toenails 
maybe). But another era ends as 
Tony/Tanya rides off to the 
wonderful world of Salt Lake 
City and vicinity — the Mor¬ 
mons are definitely NOT ready 
for this one. So thanks, Tony, 


The array of contestants at the Daddy’s Boy contest at the Eagle last weekend. (Photo: Rink) 


FLASH! NOW OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY! 


FRENCH PORNOGRAPHY! 


GIANT 3 UNIT 


French Legionaires and Black 
Arab Boys! Lust and Desire 
in the Casablanca Bazaar. 

Actually filmed in Morocco! 

“MALE HAREM” 


BLOCKBUSTER SHOW! 


PLUS 


Remember: It will be safer in a Gay 
establishment on Halloween than be¬ 
ing in the streets. 


One of the world’s most beautiful men of tongue- 
wet lips and deep-dark eyes stars in 

FRENCH SCHOOLBOYS 

Filmed on location 
in Paris and Lyon. 

WORLD 
PREMIERE 


Nice message on my answering 
machine from Daddy ’84 Chris¬ 
tian Heran of the RushRiv — 
thanks, dude . . . And speaking 
of the RushRiv, at the Rainbow 
Cattle Co. they’re having their 
annual pumpkin carving contest 
for three days running next week 
— Sun., Mon., and Tues., Oct. 
28, 29, and 30. Over at their 
other dive, the MINE, the Hal¬ 
loween Costume Party on that 
same night has a DYNASTY 
theme and, honey, there’s not a 
sequin or rhinestone to be found 


for all your love and patience. 
Everyone at the B.A.R. will 
miss YOU! 

See you all next week — are 
you ready — and remember: It 
will be safer in a Gay establish¬ 
ment on Halloween than being 
in the streets. Our own Angels of 
Mercy, the CUAV volunteers, 
can’t do it all, so volunteer if you 
want to make it a sane and safe 
celebration. See you ’round the 
campi. ■ 

Mister Marcus 




The Winning Moment. Dean Gibson shed a few tears upon winning the 
Daddy’s Boy contest at the Eagle last weekend. (Photo: Rink) 


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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 37 
























































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BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 38 

it *83f ,c5f, RrlBOTOO 



FRIESE FRAME 


All Hallows Eve 


MARK FRIESE 


T he Beaux Arts Ball this past 
weekend at the Galleria got 
mixed reviews from people 
who attended. Dexter Devoe put 
on a great show, and Sharon 
Redd played to the crowd, who 
were there, giving them her all. 
Bob Ross and Char looked great 
and did a wonderful job, despite 
the obstacles they had to over¬ 
come with the itinerary. 

Tammy Lynn and Alan Hem¬ 
ming were given a party at the 
Kokpit last Monday evening as 
a victory celebration for winning 
Mr. and Miss Tavern Guild at 
this year’s Tavern Guild picnic. 
Everyone had a great time, but 
what other kind of time do you 
have when you are at the, 
Kokpit? 

Well, now that you have all 
your information under your 
belt about the pre-Halloween 
festivities, we should, of course, 
get into the next of the pre- 
Halloween parties. Actually, 
there should be a movement 
among all of the Gay community 
to make the last Saturday of Oc¬ 
tober our official Halloween and 
Gay celebration. 

Nevertheless, the bars all 
around town are geared up 
either for this weekend, the 31st, 
or both, and your favorite bars 
will all be doing something spe¬ 
cial this year, as always. 

At the Ramrod, Mr. & Miss 
Gay San Francisco will be hav¬ 
ing a Halloween benefit for the 
Inter-Club Fund this Saturday 
at 8 p.m., with prizes, of course. 

David Bandy will be having 
his annual festive Halloween 
bash at the Galleria, also this 
Saturday evening, with a special 
appearance by Jeanie Tracy. 
Tix are available at Headlines at 
$25 each. 

Also, the same evening, from 
10 p.m. ’til dawn, the Troca- 
dero Transfer will host its Black 
Party, entitled “Comic Book 
Fantasy. ” The special guest star 
will be “Don’t Leave Me This 
Way” Thelma Houston. Info 
can be yours by calling the Troc 
event line at 495-0185. 

On Halloween night at 8 p.m. 
the Kokpit will host a party and 
asks the guests to bring baskets 
of food (non-perishable items) 
for AIDS patients. There will be 
prizes for the biggest baskets. 

Another important service for 
people with AIDS is the AIDS 
Hospice of San Francisco. Right 
now they could certainly use 


donations and fundraisers to 
continue the valuable service 
they provide. Please help them 
out by contacting Tina Martin 
at 285-5622. 

Look for it here in this column 
in two weeks. A story of junior 
high school love between two 
people most of you know, B.G. 
and F.H. 

A few more happenings for 
Saturday the 27th out in the 
Valencia area that should be fun 
are Witches Night at the Valen¬ 
cia Rose, which starts up at 
10 p.m. with wacky Marga 
Gomez, Linda Moakes, and 
other great comics — guaran¬ 
teed to scare up lots of laughs. 
Also, Esta Noche on 16th St. 
will have its Halloween party 
with fun and prizes. 



A four-week parenting class 
for Gays and Lesbians will be of¬ 
fered beginning Nov. 1, from 
6:30 to 9 p.m., at the Castro- 
Valencia Center, 450 Church St. 
The course will focus on issues 
Gay and Lesbian families face, 
a study of our role models, and 
a networking social. To pre¬ 
enroll, call Jan Baer at 285-4140 
with your name and phone 
number. ■ 


Raggs, at 22 4th Street, will 
be the setting for a cabaret show 
with various performers from 
around town. This is a fund¬ 
raiser for Milton Marks, and 
will happen this Monday, the 
29th, from 7 to 10 p.m., no-host 
bar and a $10 donation at the 
door. 

The Mint will be having its 
Halloween party Wednesday 
night, as will the New Bell, Blue 
and Gold, Pendulum, and Gin¬ 
ger’s will be having a tea dance 
starting at 6 a.m. the day after 
all the Halloween hoopla. 

My buddy from the Bulldog 
days, Marne, is in town for the 
weekend, and if you’re reading 
this, come by and see me at the 
Bell on Thursday night or Satur¬ 
day during the day. 

Happy Halloween to all of 
you. Stay safe, and enjoy the 
parties. But most of all, enjoy 
your friends. ■ 


Gay Greeks 

Hyacinth us, the cultural and 
social group for Gay women and 
men of Greek ancestry, is plan¬ 
ning a December potluck for 
both old and new members. 
Since Hyacinthus has been in¬ 
active for some time, the forth¬ 
coming reunion will give in¬ 
terested people an opportunity 
to discuss the viability and 
future direction of the group. 
For more information write: 
Hyacinthus, Box 14022, San 
Francisco, CA 94114, or call 
Nikos at 775-6143 (10 a.m. to 
10 p:m.). ■ 



Ron Moore, Mr. International Leather ’84, and Vern Stewart at the Daddy's 
Boy contest at the Eagle last weekend. (Photo: Rink) 















































BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 39 


The train roars through in Starlight Express. 


ous alternate endings. Overall, 
the script illustrates the dif¬ 
ference between cleverness, 
which it has, and wit, which it 
aspires to. 

★ ★ ★ 

“This is perfectly dreadful,” 
says a character in Aren’t We 
All? before we have time to find 
out for ourselves. Actually, he 
overstates the case against the 
understated Frederick Lonsdale 
comedy, but what critic can re¬ 
sist such a setup? 

The play harks back to those 
innocent days when “a kiss” was 
all the indiscretion needed to 
cause a scandal and wreck a 
marriage. It’s been revived as a 
vehicle for Claudette Colbert 
and Rex Harrison, who are ex¬ 
pected to bring it to New York 
next spring. He’s been acting 
and aging steadily, while she 
seems to have taken a number of 
years off from both. She sparkles 
like an ingenue — which, thank 
God, she isn’t trying to play — 
while he tries to substitute 


charm for the skills he’s lost, 
such as memorizing lines and fit¬ 
ting into Henry Higgins’ smok¬ 
ing jacket. 

A sub-plot has Colbert trying 
to get Harrison to marry her, 
while the main story is a gentle 
farce about Rex’s son, who is 
caught kissing another woman 
by his wife, who was equally un¬ 
faithful with a man on a trip 
abroad. Nicola Pagett was a joy 
to watch as the wife, doing more 
acting than the rest of the cast 
combined. Michael Gough 
swished too much in the role of 
a henpecked vicar. 

★ ★ ★ 

In the “Off-Off” category I 
saw Bouncers, an original piece 
by the Hull Truck Theatre 
Company, which played a week 
in London as part of an extend¬ 
ed tour which began in the 
“Fringe” section of the Edin¬ 
burgh Festival. 

W ritten and directed by John 
Godbar, it looked at a day and 
night of disco ritual through the 


eyes of the bouncers. Besides the 
title role, the five-man cast also 
played several patrons — male 
and female — and various other 
characters. Their “women,’’ 
with no help from costumes or 
makeup, gave the impression 
that the actors were afraid to let 
their female sides really come 
through. 

The frequently scatological 
script conveyed the message of 
the universality of the experience 
of going out to a bar in hopes of 
getting laid and ending up get¬ 
ting drunk instead. A brief ref¬ 
erence to Gays sharing this syn¬ 
drome merely allowed some 
macho shit to be dumped on the 
speaker. 

I left just before the openings 
of The Nerd, a comedy by 
American actor Larry Shue, 
who appeared in American 
Buffalo in Berkeley last year, 
and Blockheads, a musical 
about Laurel and Hardy, but it’s 
good to have an excuse to go 
back. B 

S. Warren 


This call Is only $2.00 In most of tha 415 area coda. Additional toll 
chargas may apply In parts of tha 415 area coda and throughout 
California. 


Mainstream British Theater 


(Continued from page 24 ) 

Thing, this year’s Broadway 
sensation which has been run¬ 
ning for two years in London. It 
makes a case for romance via 
compromise by exploring such 
alternatives as jealous monog¬ 
amy in the story of a playwright 
and an actress who dissolve their 
respective marriages to form one 
together. 

With his usual wordplay — 
“The days of the digital are 
numbered” — Stoppard argues 
all sides of every question bril¬ 
liantly. He’s only able to arrive 
at conclusions because his char¬ 
acters are more human than 
usual. They’re not Gay, but 
much of their bickering sounds 
awfully familiar. The Real 
Thing is for cynics who believe 
in romance and anyone who can 
appreciate a well-turned phrase, 
even if it contradicts their most 
deeply cherished beliefs. 

★ ★ ★ 

After heady doses of Stoppard 


and Frayn, Passion Play re¬ 
veals what a relatively minor 
playwright Peter Nichols is — 
with the exception of his A Day 
in the Death of Joe Egg. A 
Broadway flop last year, the first 
act of Passion — as it was 
known in New York — is like a 
George Axelrod comedy of the 
’50s childishly updated by the 
addition of dirty words. A faith¬ 
ful husband well into middle age 
inherits the young mistress his 
best friend had left his wife for. 

The second act flirts with the 
idea of Lesbianism as a trendy 
addition to a free spirit’s reper¬ 
toire, then turns heavy. Both the 
newly straying husband and his 
wife have alter egos who share 
the stage with them. The result 
is a complex exercise for the ac¬ 
tors and their director which be¬ 
comes confusing toward the end 
as the two sides of each charac¬ 
ter go off in different directions, 
leaving what may be simultane¬ 


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BAY AREA REPORTER CLASSIFIEDS 


Support Your Community 
Make Donor Options To 
UNITED WAY 
Specify 

NATIONAL GAY RIGHTS 
ADVOCATES 


6 


Support Your Community 
Make Donor Options To 
UNITED WAY 
Specify 

SHANTI PROJECT 


6 


VACATION 

RENTALS 



HOLIC 


A Guesthouse on the Russian River 


P.O.Box 465 • 15905 River Hoad 
Guemeville. Cfi 95446 • (707, 869-3279 


FOR SALE 


LEVOLORS 
45% OFF 

Alexander-Long, Inc. 
621-8305 

4111-18th St. (at Castro) 


NEED CASH — SELLING ALL 
LUXURY FURNISHINGS FROM 
S.F. BAY EXECUTIVE ESTATE. 
ARTICALS LESS THAN 1 MONTH 
OLD. CUSTOM SOFA AND LOVE 
SEAT $450; COMPLETE 5-PC. 
BDRM SET $550; 3-PC LIGHTED 
WALL UNIT $650: COMPLETE 9-PC 
FORMAL DINING ROOM COST 
$3000. SELL $1650. ALSO: STEREO. 
CURIO CABINETS. LAMPS. 
DATSUN 280Z, ETC. CAN HELP 
DELIVER. 

345-7059 


Support Your Community 
Make Donor Options To 
UNITED WAY 
Specify 

LESBIAN RIGHTS PROJECT 


WANTED 


Men, over 28,to model for 
creative, nude (non-sexual) photo 
project. Write: P.Q. Box 1 9073, 
Oakland, CA' 94619. E43 

Car, Cycle, Van from $50 to 
$350.. Will fix. 885-6852 Cash. 

. E43 


CLUBS & 

ORGANIZATIONS 


Man/Boy Love 
News, art and opinions 
Bulletin only $1. NAMBLA-B, 
537 Jones #8418,SF CA 94102 
E43 

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Into J/O, phone J/O, or man-to-] 
man action Join the premier J/O, 
Club with over 2,100 active mem-, 
bers. Write; 

MEN’S WORLD 
P.O. Box 1616, LA, CA 90078 

Stjiy_Healthy! Get off your way— ‘ 


GAG STATIONERY $4; COCKRING $6; IN¬ 
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LIST $1.50 PLUS SASE. SANDERS, BOX 121, 
484 LAKE PAQK AVE., OAKLAND, CA 94610 


&&&&&&& 

hALLOWEEN NOISE MAKERS 
b dEAT your own tamboriric 
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I SANG a pa i r of cymbal s 

391 Ellis st. 673-6313 

2-1980 Kawasaki Classic 1000's, 
1-1980 Kawaskai 550 Ltd., 431- 
2215, Jane or Marlene EB 


GARAGE SALE 

3000 sq. ft. of items 
Daily 9 AM to 9 PM till all sold. 
608 Fillmore, SF. CA eb 


Deco & English Furniture 
Call 346-9618 to see 8-4 


E43 


Russian River Restaurant 
Good income, dynamite location 
Asking 66K. Agt. (707) 869-2892 
E46 

Folsom Area Bar 
Call agt. for info: 664-2444 


FOR RENT 


$65 a week - $15 a night 
For Gays since 1970 
24 hr. desk 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

1139 Market St. 864-9343 


BEST POLK ST. ADDRESS 

SMALL FRIENDLY ROOMING 
HOUSE ATMOSPHERE-GAY BLDG 

THE SHIRLEY 

1544 Polk nr. Sacramento 928-3353 
FROM $65 PER WEEK 


Locally Employed Welcome 



Low Daily and 
Weekly Rates 

ALL GAY 

SAUNA LOUNGE - SUNDECK 
TV m Room or Share Kitchen 

NEAR CIVIC CENTER 


THE 


417 GOUGH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO. CA 94102 
(415)4319131 


NEW! 



e 1984 Edition 

Of 

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featuring thousands of books for gay 
men and lesbians, their families and 
friends. Our new 100-page Whole Qay 
Catalog brings the world of gay and 
lesbian literature as close as your 
mailbox. Order Your Copy Today! 
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Please send me 99* Whole Qay Catalog. I enclose $2. 

Name ... _ 

Address ___ 

.City _ State 


_ Zip 


Send to: 

Lambda Rising 
Dept. BAR 
2012 S Street, NW 
Washington. D.C. 20009 . 


3^2 IVY HOTEL 

daily • WEEKLY • MOMTnLX 
$70 & Up Weekly 

■« 

/ (415)863-6388 

559 Octavia, 5 F . CA 94102 


THEATRE DISTRICT 

WINTON HOTEL 

445 O'Farrell 885-1988 

$20 per night $65 per week 


A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE 

Beautifully furnished rooms in 
Private Home 

Color TV • Phone* Sundeck 
Kitchen Privileges 
$150 wk-$500 mo. 

626 0374 


COMMUNITY 

RENTALS 

• Over 1 300 Apts, flats & 
houses each month. 

• Vacancies in all city areas. 

• 2 convenient offices. 

• Open 7 da vs a week. 

• Gav owned/Gav staffed. 

552-9595 


DONNELLY HOTEL 

Clean - Quiet 

Central to Polk, Folsom, Castro Areas 
$ 60/week & up 

1272 Market Street 
621-9953 


Hayward room $200/mo. 

Pvt. bath. Close to BART. Ideal for 
Hayward State or Chabot College 
886-9440,_E43 

Winfield Street View 
1 1/2 Br. 2 Ba on 2 floors, 
Gourmet K. 700 mo % utils. 
On St. pking. Call 282-5345. 
_ E43 

$395 bright studio w/view, hard¬ 
wood, laundry, sun roof. Vacant. 
566 Fell. 863-4024 _ E 43 - 

Viet. $ 1300. 9 rms, 4 br., nu/dec, 
hdwd firs. 626-6635 E43 

Modern 3 br. tri-level home. View 
of SF skyline and Brisbane hills. 
$1000.468-5447. E43 


Bunk house Apts. 

Office: 419 Ivy Street 
San Francisco 
Mon.-Fri. 1-6 PM 
Or By Appointment 

1 B.R., 554 Hayes, #3 ..$450 
1 B.R., 514 jHayes, #2 ..$400 

6 Rm. Townhouse.$750 

417 Ivy. For 1 or 2 persons. 

Renovated and Secure 
All new AEK. Electric Heat. 

All references checked. 
Must be employed. 

Stove, refrigerator, carpets 
and curtains included. First 
and last months rent 
required. No deposits. 

863-6262 


HOTEL SEQUOIA 

Large, clean and inexpen¬ 
sive rooms with a view. _ 

In the heart of Downtown, near 
Polk and Folsom Strasse 
and Union Square 

GAY OPERATED 

520 JONES, SF (415)673-0234 


THERESIDENCECLUB 

SAUNA • SUNDECK • HOT SPA 

• COIN LAUNDRY • AM/FM 
CLOCK RADIOS • TV LOUNGE 
•24-HR DESK* PRIVATE/KEYED 
CLUB SECTION FOR PERMA¬ 
NENT RESIDENTS • REFER¬ 
ENCES REQUIRED • 3-MONTH 
SUGGESTED MINIMUM STAY 

• RESERVED OR IMMEDIATE 
OCCUPANCY. 



(415) 552-7100 

600 FILLMORE STREET 

THE HOTEL 

LOCALS’ CHOICE FOR MINI 
VACATIONS • CONTINENTAL 
BREAKFAST* ADULT MOVIES/ 
MINI-THEATRE • RESIDENCE 
CLUB FRIENDLINESS • TOURIST 
HOTEL CONVENIENCE*DAILY 
AND WEEKLY RATES 
CENTRAL LOCATION (POLK 
FOLSOM-CASTRO) 



a pretty posh paltry-priced 
place for pleasant people 

tor particulars phone proprietor 


492 Grove (atOctavia) 
San Francisco. 94102 


CIVIC CENTER HOTEL 

$60/wk & up - $14/day & up 
24-hr Desk - Switchboard 
Great Transportation 

20 12th St. (nr Market & Van Ness) 
861 2373 


ROOMMATES 


NEED A ROOMMATE 

OUR GAY ROOMMATE SERVICE 
HAS HELPED 1000s OF 
GAY MEN AND LESBIANS 

552-8868 


•wE’RE LOOKING FOR A FEW j 
• GOOD MEN MODEL AND MASSEUR | 
I TYPES 21-35 UNINHIBITED. MATURE j 
I AND DRUG FREE. 

626-3118 | 

I BLACK, HISPANICS_NEEDED__ J 

THEWATERGARDEN 

is accepting applications for 
ON CALL and PART TIME posi- 
| tions. Apply in person between 
10 AM-4 PM, Monday thru Friday. 

| Valid picture I.D. will be requested. 
1010 The Alameda, San Jose, CA 


WAITERS, COOKS, 
BARTENDERS 

WE ARE NOW ACCEPTING ^ 
9 APPLICATIONS FOR FULL AND J 
J PART-TIME HELP. 

PARADISE BAR AND GRILL J 
135-12th ST., OAKLAND 
« 834-1222 

6CCCC 


Russian Riv. House, 2bd/2bh, 
Sunny Deck, Quiet, Newly re¬ 
modeled $500/mo. or wkd rate 
(415)863-2490/431-7605 E46 

Move right in! 

Victorian flat w/garage. $780. 
Beautiful floors, 1, or 2 bdrs, 
beautifully done. 1033 Guerrero. 
Don't let the outside fool you. Be- 
ing redone. 863-4024. Bob. E43 

$500-525 1 br. apts. $825 Ig. 5 
rm. flat remdl. Edw., new kits- 
baths. Ph. 221-2788 E43 


City views. 2 bdrm, hrdwd firs, 
new kitchen, Ig. garden, $925 per | 
month. 648-5533 E43 

$600 per month. Remod. Viet. 

1 br. apt. D/W, Disp., W/D, deck, 
w/w cpt., mini blinds. 931-3644. 

E43 

Large 5 room flat, redecorated, 
Levilors, w/w carpet, washer/ 
dryer, dishwasher, central heat, 
yard. B&B Properties. $850 mo. 
343-3634. Bruce.Larson E43 


JOBS 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 40 

r * 3QAS ,3£ 838(0TOO R3THOfl3fl A3flA YA4 


EROTIC FILMMAKER 

NEEDS MODELS IMMEDIATELY FOR THE 
FOLLOWING SUBJECTS: 1.BIG BALLS, 
2. BIG COCKS, CUT AND UNCUT, 3. PRETTY 
ASSHOLES. FACIAL APPEARANCE NOT 
NECESSARILY REQUIRED. IF YOU QUALIFY 
IN ONE OR MORE OF THESE AREAS CALL 
FOR AN APPOINTMENT. 

781-3380 


Bartenders, Barbacks, and misc. 
part time help needed. Apply 
2-5 PM, Sat. Oct. 27, 1984. 
The End Up. E43, 

Phone fantasy service needs 
imaginative men with good phone 
voices. Office help also needed. 
Call between IQ-3, 864-1106. 

.' - ' E43 

EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM 
Low income : gay &-lesbian 
hospitality house, 146 Leaven¬ 
worth, SF. M-F, 9-3. Wayne 
Austin, 776-2102 for appt. 

. E43 

PERFORMERS 

Savages hiring nude performers 
for J/O shows. Call 673-3383. 

' E43 

Progressive co. in S.F. needs per¬ 
son for night janitorial work and 
office cleaning. Also person for 
night sales with good telephone 
voice & who types accurately, and 
computer software person. Good 
ref. required. Send resume to 
Michael Dee, 109 Minna Street, 
#142, SF, CA 94105 E43' 


Model Masseur Types 

All Nationalities Needed 
apply: 

Golden Boy 
Model Agency 
626-1848 - Alexander 


Nice mat. clean-cut GWM student 
go to DVC wants home to share 
w/nonsmkr GWM by mid Nov. 
Con/WC/PH area. Call evenings, 
672-0520_ E43 

Concord area roommate to share 
3 br. home with pool, all conv. Call 
672-1575. E43 

$300 + util & dep. Alamo Sq. Lg. 
3 br. fit. for rm w/GWM 30+, 
346-2606. E43 


Erotic nude perf. for adult gay 
cinema. Apply 729 Bush. 6-8 PM. 

EB 

Exec. Director, Seattle Counseling 
Service' for Sexual Minorities. 
Resume to SCS, Personnel, 1 505 
Broadway, Seattle 98122 by 
11/1/84. E43 

CAN YOU TILE? 

Tiler needed urgently, for pro¬ 
gressive & easy-going work. You 
work days/nights, or as you wish. 
Good pay. Must be honest. Please 
call John: 821-0644 anytime. 
, y: ; - -V v-, E43 

FASHION MODELS 

Male models. G.Q. types 18-35, 
5' 10" and over wanted by legit 
top fashion men's agency. Call 
model mgt. (415) 282-8858. 
Serious only. E46 

COOK - PART TIME 

Two nights. Also taking applica¬ 
tions for all positions. Davids, 
737-Stockton Avenue, San Jose, 
after 4 PM E45 


MEN WANTED 

WITH DEEP VOICES FOR 
TELEPHONE WORK. MUST 
BE BONDABLE 
824-2297 9-6, M-F 


Applications taken now for 
Manager. Expr. and ref. neces¬ 
sary. Call 543-7700. The End Up 
E43 


Sweeping Sidewalks in Front of 
Private Residences. M-F, Part- 
Time, 20 Hrs. per week. Call 
Mon.-Fri., 1 - 6 PM ONLY. 
863-6262 


BODY 

SERVICES 


SPECIALIZED GYM 
INSTRUCTION 

Private instruction for BB. 
Body shaping, weight gain, dieting 
and loss of body fat. See 8/2/84 
B.A.R. (Sports). 

BODY SHAPE 

Courtland Wright_864-0475 





























































































































































BAY AREA REPORTER CLASSIFIEDS 


PHONE SEX 

The men who use our service 
get connected together for a hot, 
erotic gay experience with other 
HORNY GUYS 24 hrs. a day. 
Do it now for LESS THAN $3.00 
an hour. 

(415) EGO-TRIP (346-8747) 


Marc 



Inflation-fighter Perm - 
$40 complete 

Cut and bio — Men and Women 
Men's short cut - $10 

760 Market at Grant 
Rm. 401-6, Phelan Bldg. 
Tuesday-Sat 362-5198 


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WITH EXPERIENCED ATTORNEY 

Walter R. Nelson 3SS-95C3 


| Wanted: Young Latino, Asian or 
blonde for houseboy/masseur. 
Steve 626-4979 E44 

CHOICES DATING SVC 

415-626-3131, 40&-971-7408 

E44 

Lean back - push your tool into 
super talented hands - watch 6' 
video screen - Castro/Market Jay 
863-4479_ E49 

Free Waikiki Trip 793-3894 E43 
Alone, Why Be? 

Dislike going by yourself to dinner, 
theatre, etc.? GWM, 37, good- 
looking, available for legitimate 
escort. Reasonable flat rate. Box 
1 397, El Cerrito, CA 94530 £45 

Hot Men Want 
Bearded Husky Guys 
for 3-ways 
Call 282-6380 

Anytime E43 

PARTY BUDDY 

Stocky, bearded, 40 yo, generous 
WGM seeks masc buddy. Muse 
g/a a plus, heavy duty partier a 
must. Goal safe but not sane fun. 
Any age, race. Drop a line to JJ, 
584 Castro, Suite 439, SF 94114 
E43 

Nudity, j/o & more - slim W/M 
21-35 call 928-3886 E43 


BOOKKEEPING SERVICES 

• Complete Computerized Financial State¬ 

ment for Small Businesses 

• Set-up and Maintain Records 

• Free Consultation • Free Pick-up and 

delivery • Reasonable Rates. 

JOHN LARISA 864-3524 


AFFORDABLE 
LEGAL SERVICE 

BANKRUPTCY $175 
WILLS - CORPS.- PARTNERSHIPS 
LAW OFFICE OF 

SCOTT V. SMITH 
863-1417 


JACK OFF BUDDIES 

Come watch the jizz fly and shoot yours 
too at our big strictly J/O party. Boy 
scout PP games and our famous cum 
shooting contest Wed. and Sat. 8:00 PM, 
583 Grove, SF. $3 donation benefit Gay 
Rescue Mission. 431-8748. 


14 HOURS 

NOB HILL CINEMA 

729 BUSH ST. 781-9468 


. Pm 

A New Way to Play The Oldest Game 


PEOPLE 


Nationwide Computerized Introduction 
for Gay Men ■ Memberships from $20 
Get Your Questionnaire Today! 

109 Minna St., Suite 606 
415-431 -1158 San Francisco, CA 94105 



THE PACIFIC TSi 
EXCHANGES Ij 


LISTEN FREE *24 HOURS 
GAY MEN CALL 826-8800 
TAPEYOURAD 826-7887 


HYPNOSIS 

CAN HELP YOU 

Smoking Too Much? Overweight? 
Sexual/Relationship Problems ? 

Daniel M. Pasutti 

Cert.Hypnotherapist, Ph.D., M.F.C.C. 

431-8361 


MENS TROKLKS 

j N<?w . ndt.ona ieP : fh ; 

■ conscious orrespondenc' 3 org j 
i 1o r men into J 'Q 'oveurisrr. 
jar'd Exhibitionism MS! j 
j Box 42667 S F 94142 


PHONE SEX 

The men who use our service 
get connected together for a hot, 
erotic gay experience with other 
jHQ PNY GUYS 24 hrs. a day. 
Do it now for LESS THAN $3.0q 
an hour. 

(415) EGO-TRIP (346-8747) 


FIND YOUR LOVER 

Past Life and Tarot Readings 
Call Sean 

626-4329 E43 

Phone j/o club 431-8748 E49 

Cruising list. Send 1, get all. Box 
1 5351-LL, LA 90015 E44 

Sergio, please contact David or 
Rose. Concerned over your disap¬ 
pearance since 9-11-84. We hope 
you are well & please contact 
home ASAP. Love, David. E43 

My name is Peter. I'm 26, 6', 143 
lbs. and very good looking. I'm 
looking for guys who are tall, lean, 
smooth and flat. 552-0168 E43 


HYPNO-DYttAffltCS 

Past Life Regressions 
Self-Hypnosis Training to 
Achieve Goals: 

RELAXATION NON-SMOKING J 

QUITTING ALCOHOL 
WEIGHT CONTROL MOTIVATION j 1 

STRESS MANAGEMENT 
INCREASED PERFORMANCE 
SELF-CONFIDENCE 
GROUP PRIVATE 

CLASSES CONSULTATIONS 

JIM JOHNSON 

Certified Hypnotherapist 

362-4264_647-1696] 

Complete front and rear oral ser¬ 
vicing my specialty. Top or bot¬ 
tom. 552-9427 Castro area, eves 
& weekends E43 

Russian River-Guerneville 
Nude photos taken for fun. Need 
good head, j/o, a/p, W/M, 34, 
6'1", 200#. Wayne, POB 1000, 
Lucerne,CA 95458 E43 

LIVE SHOW 

and good times at the right price. 
Savages, 220 Jones 
Call 673-3384 E43 

Eye won bingo in Maywood with 
San Francisco fone book E43 

Sexual fulfillment wanted by 
Reverend Fred 922-9178 E43 

Horny Hung Latin Top 
BB, 5'10", 145, exprt facestr sks 
service by hot muse men. Call 
6-12pm 863-1559 E43 


MASSAGE 


“I promise you one of the best 
massages of your life.” 

weiiLLwi 

I am a Certified Masseur and 
offer an exceptional 75 minute 
massage that combines the best 
techniques of Esalen, Swedish 
and Shatsu. It is both sensuous 
and health-safe. _ 

65 Minute Massage.$40. 

Out Call Massage...$60. 

120 Minute Massage.$70. 

DAVID 673-1308 

Graduate of CA School of Massage. 1976. 

♦ + ♦ ♦ 4 Star Rating in Eric s Word. 


ESALEti MASSAWE 

Individual Sessions 
Weekly Classes 

Hilo Jarvis B63-2B42 

Nonsexual 


BODY FANTASY 

REACH THE POINT OF ECSTASY. AN 
INCH AT A TIME WITH THE HELP OF THIS 
SENSUAL BLACK MASSEUR. 

928-6463 

TRACER CHECKS O K. 


EXPERT MASSAGE 

HANDSOME ORIENTAL 

BODYBUILDER 


KEN 


668-8877 


^ MEET THAT T 
SPECIAL GUY! 

Relationship Renaissance 

Discreet • Ages 20 - 60 

the quality service 
for quality men 
since 1974 



Tantric massage, bind swimmer, 
out $50.Rick 431-4859^ E43 

TfRE D OF RfP O FFS ? 

MONEY BACK 
G UARANTE E! 

• Warmly Professional • 

• Ultimately Erotic • 

SENSUAL 

MASSAGE 

SINGLE OR DOUBLE 

MIKE AND JEFF 

567-2345 


LOVE YOURSELF 

Sensuous 
Therapeutic 
MASSAGE 
Tailored to 
Your Needs 
HEALING 
CARING 
$40/hr In Up 
VISA/MC 
IN/OUT 
441-7628 



★ TRANTWC MASSAGE = ★ 

★ ECSTACY + HEALTH! ★ 

2 hrs. bliss balance 7 chakras 
Healing warm oils. Light 
touch in a private 
intimate space of 
pleasure and peace 
sharing and caring. 



LA. (213) 854-1800 
S.F. (415) 775-9169 


$20 • Super massage • Satisfies 
Video • John Allen • 775-2595 

E47 

Complete massage by handsome 
guy. Dwntwn SF. 885-1558, 
Mark. 24 hrs. - E46 

Handsome, personable, young 
man offers sensual, prof, release- 
massage. 863-8876 E43 

SEXY MASSAGE 

Tall, Dark & Handsome, 180# 
37, well hung, discreet, $30 
San Jose • Ian • 247-8634 

E44 

S/M Massage $40 474-5576 

E47 


THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE 
to thoroughly relax, reduce stress 
& pain. Doug 863-5315 E44 


Creative holistic style bodywork. 
Muscle worship. 626-3131 ext. 
511, Max E43 

Spain's David. Become my regu- . 
lar, get royal treatment. 468-5447 
$40-$45. Call!! E43 

COMPLETE MALE 

massage, safe 

Rick 647-6035 E43 

Meditative-Massage 
More Better Than Sex! 

Ring Rahjan 826-9589 


GWM, 32, 145, swimmer's build, 
nonsexual $50. Massage/out. 
P.O. Box 14414, S.F., CA 94114 
E43 

Tired of ripoffs/unsafe areas/filthy 
apts & hand-jobs? For a great full 
massage plus hot all-cum shot 
video: Call Bill at 282-1266. Only 
$40.0011!_ E43 

Sensual massage by 2 loving men. 
Jim/Pete 864-5483 E43 

In the Castro. Expert 75-min. non¬ 
sexual Esalen massage $25. Jim 
864-2430 E43 


MASSAGE THERAPY 


SAFE SEX YOGA 

In tantra, turning on is always good 
for you, if done with respect, sensi¬ 
tivity and love. Warm, sensual contact 
in a ”womb pool” gradually fills our 
bodies with vibrant sexual energy. 
Whether or not toe choose to release, 
the experience leaves us completely 
rejuvenated. Can you handle l'/s hours 
of pleasure Call me at 626-7696. 
Session fee: $35. 


MODELS AND 
ESCORTS 




HOT, HAIRY AND BLACK 

6', 170*, MASCULINE BUILD, 

9"/THICK, AVAIL. FOR SEVERAL 
OCCASIONS AND FANTASIES. 

928-NINE 

24 HOURS CHECKS O.K. 


ROGER IS BACK! 

SAFE AND SANE S/M 
BUILT, INTELLIGENT, 
AND DISCREET 

(415) 864-5566 



Who says a masseur can’t be 
friendly, built, clean, hung, hand¬ 
some and fun. Had a hard day 
and need to be pampered. 

FULL MASSAGE • 40/50 

ANDY 24 Hrs. 673-1141 


OUT TO RELAX? 

Want someone professional and friend¬ 
ly. I give a full body massage in the 
nude. I am a Norwegian 'man, 28, 
Lt. Bodybuilder and swimmer. Hand¬ 
some and clean cut. Certified. 

885-6309 $30 in 24 hrs 


ON TOP OF NOB HILL 



A FULL BODY 
MASSAGE - IN 
THE NUDE. 
BIKERAND 
SWIMMER. 

| CLEAN-CUT. 
24 HOURS 


EX-NAVY MAN* HANDSOME HUNK 

KARL 474-3194 


SERIOUS?INTO RELAXING? 

Very handsome Swedish man will give you a 
full body massage - naked. 30 yrs. old, 
defined, fuzzy chest (Teddy Bear type). 

A $100 massage for the awful low price of 

$30 IN and $40 OUT. 

885-3346 24 HRS. 


SHIATSU - HEALING ART OF 
ACUPRESSURE BODYWORK. 
SWEDISH - OIL TECHNIQUE, 
SENSUOUS, RELAXING. 
LICENSED IN/OUT 

SUNG _ 863-7840 

Enjoy the Enema & Massage 
Todd • 759-9512 

E43 

Let me rub U the rite way. 5'9", 
140. Michael, 626-9035 E43 

A Fun Complete Massage 
621-7781 Karl E44 

Muscles sensuously relaxed by. 
athlete. Jay 621-6331 E43 

Wanted in S.J. for Massage 
Blond model, 18-25, swimmer 
build, 2 guys (408) 225-5455 

E44 

RICK MAPEL 

gives the Bay Area's Best 
Massage. Relaxing, soothing, re¬ 
juvenating. Nonsexual $20/$30. 
H: 641-5045 E43 

HOT YOUNG ITALIAN 

SAFE NURSE 

gives sensitive, erotic 

PROSTATE 

Massage. Tony, 621-7242 


Therapeutic massage $20/$30 
Professional, Nonsexual 
Paul, 928-6464. Certified. 

E43 

Great massage, sensual, safe, 
sensitive, 776-8413, Jon E43 

OAdr/V-f .c’i: 

BAY AREA REPORTER 



Versatile/Top 6'1" 522-9829 

E44 



KEITH MAVERICK 
441-3886 


OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 41 






























































































































































































SAY AREA REPORTER CLASSIFIEDS 


MEN, MEN AND 
MORE MEN 
The Best in 
Phone Fantasy 
(415) 821-9952 

Hot Cops Muscle Men 
Hot Tops Sweat 

Daddys Jock Straps 

Daddy’s Boy Bondage 
Truckers W.S. 

Leather SandM 

and much, much more 
CREDIT CARDS 

DIAL-A-DADDY 


STRAIGHT 
CHUNKY IRISHMAN 

THICK CUT 8” 
Kurt 864-3728 
$25 Anytime 


• Yng handsm & masc 863-6536. 
8" E43 


Har>dsome Guy Loves Your 
Wild Fr to Take Him 
As Many Tinges As You Can 
• Tim, 885-0852 • 

E43 


• Dick of Death • 626-2968 Drew 
E43 


Master's Master 

Leather Master, very muscular, 
XXX hndsm, Tom of Finland looks, 
intelligent, tall, 36. S&M, Disci¬ 
pline, Punishment, It to hvy C&B & 
Nipple Work, VA, Humil, Submis¬ 
sion, Spanking, Riding Crops, 
Pain/Pleasure, Daddy & more. Int'l 
model. $125 out only. MC/Visa. 

Frank (415) 861-5549 
Photos/Travel info: $10 to "Frank 
Holt," Suite 486, Box 15068 (584 
Castro) S.F., CA 94115. E43 


with toys & playroom 
into anything 

558-8686 Wvhi 


S/M - Titwork - Whips - C&B 
Blond BB - 35 - Jim 621-0297 

E44 

Handsome hairy hung 33 6'2" 
170# hard hairy well-defined body. 

Trim br hair beard/moust 
647-9220 Steve — E44 

Goodlooking and Natural 
very well-built man 
John 775-8755 E43 

Friendly Leatherman 
Biker type 29 S&M FFA B&D 
and Fantasies. In or Out. 
Elliot 861-5428 E43 


BORG 

SUPERHUNG 
HOT GERMAN STUD 

861-8034 


STEVE 775-1978 

GDLKN'G GUY IN OUT 


E43 


TOP STUD 

Hung Big & Thick 
22, 5'9", 130#, outcalls only 

LEE 543-9570 $75 

_E43 

• SILICON VALLEY • 

• 2 FOR 1 • 

2 Very Hot Guys 
for your pleasure 24 hrs. 

No fats. No Sm. 

(408) 247-6690 Mike and Jon 
$75 up E43 

Colt's Roger Hickcock - titleholder 
861-2373 #507 _ E43 

HUNGRY MOUTH 

DEEP THROAT 

Serves All! 

Call Bud 282-6380 

24 hrs in/out E43 


BLONDE BIKER 
T ALL T4S SWIMMER 
HANDSOME 30. FRIESDLS 
EVENINGS AND WEEKENDS ONL> 
$60 80 

DAVID 922-9971 


BIG ORIENTAL 
BODYBUILDER 

5'7", 180#. 48C, 31W, 17A 

TOM (415)751-7883 




HOT MUSCLES 

by Mike 

5'2", 165, a, ' 
48" ch, 31" w, 24" t, 17" c 
626-2968_ E43 

Handsome, well-built man is 

HUNG/HUNGRY 

to plow into you. 

Safe oral, anal, FF. 
Versatile. 31, 5'11", 160. 
$75. Wes 921-4469 


Brian, unCut, hot, 6'2", 180, hairy, 
anytime, 431-4991, $40 E43 

HANDSOME & HUNG 

Muscular guys. Dave 563-9921 
__E43 

Bare bottom spanking for naughty 
boys, 861-6038. E44 

Jim, 19, beautiful & smooth, PO 
Box 6355, Oakland 94603 E43 

He man bi wghtlftr x-tra long and 
fat rod 285-4319 E43 



WELCOMETO 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Others imitate, none.equal . 
The one and only, original 
RICHARD OF S.F. 

FIRST AND FOREMOST 
SINCE 1968 
With the West Coast's 
Outstanding and Discreet 
MALE MODELS 
Handsome - Masculine 
Versatile - Well Endowed 
Clean-cut. Well-Groomed 
Lowest rates >n town for 
the best models m town. | 
MALE COMPANIONS 
All Arrangements 
Discreet and Confidential 
Our Models and Companions 
are Screened tor Your Health, 
Security, and Peace of Mind 
SO WHY TAKE CHANCES. 

WE DON'T 

FRESH NEW TALENT 
No Agency Rejects or 
Tired Retreads. 

IF YOU CALL US FIRST. 

YOU'LL BE SATISFIED LATER 

• SERIOUS ONLY PLEASE • 

• WE VERIFY ALL CALLS • 
SAN FRANCISCO IS MORE FUN 

IF YOU SHARE IT. 

RICHARD OF S.F. 

(41 5) 821 - 3457 


Biker for Hire 

What do you want? 922-9746 

E44 

I B HIKE - Very handsome 
bisexual. Clean cut, friendly,! 
Norwegian man, hung nice.k 
Nice solid body and good buns. S 
^Sexy, light bodybuilder andg ? 
■ swimmer. Versatile. 

fc 775-5341 j 


SUPERHUNG 

DOMINANT, HOT STUD 

Exclusively tor those wanting <i m.m 
TLAYCIRL DISCOVERY" 

DEREK 928-4255 

Leading 5 an I rani /sc o Model,Escort 


| Lonely little Boy. I 
| Looking for Daddy.f 
I Bobby 775-36191 


U-Get-What-U-Want 

DICK 885-6028 £43 


Oral or Bottom 
Paul, eves 929-1945 


E46 


SOPHISTICATED 

GENTLEMAN 

Well-groomed companion/escort for 
gentlemen. Hot daddy too. Caring to 
kink. Blond, husky, intelligent and 
mature. We can even talk. 3-ways 
available w/yng. Doug. Sensible fees. 

COLIN 775-3619 


Don't Send for a Boy . . . 

To Do A Man's Job. 
Competition Body Builder 
6'4", 230#, 35yr, 54c, 20a, 30w 
Handsome, defined muscle for 
Posing, Flexing, J70. 

$100, out only, Visa/MC 
Todd 621-1066, call back req'd 


E43 


S&M 

fPhone Sexjl 
346-8747(1 


11" x 7V2 " 

Goodlooking Cuban, 27, 

6 '1", 185-, muscular, cut. 

ROBERTO 863*4399 


Hairy hunk with a big fat dick. 
Chuck 431-5990 E 43 

SWIMMER HUGE DICK 
College jock, 20, muscular, 
smooth, friendly, top $125. Pix 
avail. Randy 849-9369 E43 

Blond, bl. eyes, moust., 26 yrs., 
5'10", 150 lbs., muscular, hot. Gil 
552-3957 anytime $40 E43 

BB SUPERSTAR 

52c, 20a, Bill 221-3333 ext 221 

. _ £43 

DAMIAN EX-MARINE 19. 
Comp. b.builder, 58"c, 19"a, 
29"w, hung. Leave phone #, 
message. Out calls only. 539- 
1662, S.F. E43 



HOT BLACK MEN 
441-0545/24 HRS. 


E43 


HANDSOME YOUNG MEN 
from around the world. 18 to 29. 
Service to all San Francisco area. 
Seibu Modeling (415) 397-6510 

_ 1 _E43 

Hot, horny, uncut Italian, 28, 5'8", 
125#, $60. Jed 864-1633 E44 



BILLY - 567-5244 

5'9"-130-29-BI/BI eyes 

$80 ln/$100 Out. Checks OK 


★ SF’S BIGGEST ★ 

No B.S.! Huge, long, thick tool 
with big, shaved low hangers 
swinging heavy from muscular, 
hunky body, 29, hot, 
big man’s tits. 

★ MATT (415) 567-5445 ★ 


Dominant Chicano 
Short, smooth - Ed 863-9524 
E45 

HANDSOME PORNO STAR 
9" topman in films for Falcon, 
Mustang, Closeup, Nova. Joe An¬ 
drews 431-4312 E52 

SUPER HUNG 

Tall, Tanned and Handsome 
Safe. Roger, 826-0453 

____E44 

HAIRY DADDY 

TAKES CARE OF YOU 

Muscles, Massage, and More 
Handsome, Hung, Healthy Man 
Andy 648-5451 

E43 



24 hrs. 


• DADDY’S BOY! • 

makes U shoot 4 the stars 
w/best Fr/a - Gr/p ever! 
Hndsm, hairy, yng Ital. 24 hrs 
2 serv U. Luvs AM/lunch 
Castro Area 
LEO 863-7738 


6'4", 195#, hairy X-Army sgt. 
Chuck 431-1579 E 44 

Eduardo: Boyish Mexicano 
Short, Smooth, masculine; avail¬ 
able for most scenes and fantasies: 
863-9524. Very clean and healthy. 

E45 

BIG BUTT tall hairy blue-eyed 
Daddy Chad 86T-701 4 E 44 


Uncut Italian-Puerto Rican 

9 INCHES, THICK 
GOODLOOKING, FRIENDLY 
29, 5'9", 145# 

$60 Anthony 928-3391 


GOLDENBOY 

Model Agency 

Beautiful Young 


Service to Hotels & Homes 

In & Out Calls 

Personal checks OK with good ID 
MC/VISA Accepted 

(415)626-1848 

Alexander 

APPLICANTS NEEDED 


$20 • Hot athlete • Hung nice. 
• Bill, 441-1054 • Massage, etc. 

:.E43 

WELL HUNG 

Older men welcome. 550-0675 
E43 

HUNG LIKE HORSE 

Unct Eric 408-336-5077 

E48 

J/O & Exhib. Bob 928-5826 E52 
349-6192 for Attr, Muse 

LEATHERMAN 

E43 

• Collegiate Type • 
Extremely Goodlooking 

Competitive Swimmer with a 
Tight Muscular Build 
Loves getting French 
Washboard Stomach 

• Jack 775-9049 • 

E43 



TWO FOR YOU 

CLAY - Tall, Hot Bottom 
REX-Tall, Hung Top 
We Perform or you Join Us 
$120 AND UP 

EVES. AND WKENDS ONLY 

863-3276 

L.10% DISCOUNT WITH COUPON 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 42 




i 























































































































































BAY AREA REPORTER CLASSIFIEDS 


MOVING AND 
HAULING 


SINCE 1973 

CAL P.U.C.T.-140305 
INSURED P.L. & P.D. 



ELECTRICAL 

CONTRACTOR 


I SERVICE CALL WORK 
I FAST RESPONSE 
I EMERGENCY REPAIRS 
I ON-TIME, QUALITY WORK 

Cristopher 
Electric 
(415)626-2314 


EXPERT CARPENTRY 

Have a bunch of small jobs 
or a large one Call us in. 

25 years of friendly experience. 
Estimates Free 

647-1984 


..GRANNY'S 14 NOW 
ALIEN MOVING! 


MOVING 
& STORAGE 

LICENSED AND INSURED 

(415)974-6772 

CAL .TJ12 7686 MO VISA.. 


14 HOURS 

NOB HILL CINEHA 

729 BUSH ST. 781-9468 


WE’LL TAKE 
YOUR LOAD 

A Relocation Service 

Call Art 
282-8085 


CAL PUC #T142874 

(415) 929-8609 
(415) 469-8072 



‘The Professionals” 

GEMINII 
IVIOVERSI 


We can move your office, home or apt. at affordable rales. 
Fully insured, provide free estimates and packing svcs. 


FITZGERALD 

ELECTRIC 

Commercial 

Residential 

285-1370 or 282-3720 

State License 402757 

TILING AND PLUMBING 

at its best, with 20 years to prove it. 

Tile tubs - all 3 walls $450 

(incl remove old wall + new) 

New one-lever showers $185 

Xtract-fan thru wall $250 

FREE ESTIMATE • 24 HOUR EMERGENCY 

821-0644 


AKT TRUCKING 
& MOVING 

B Licensed & Insured 

CAL. T#141868 

1948 Union St. 
921-5333 


Scanlon Moving 

18' w/Lift - $45/2 Men 
Pickup - $35/2 Men 

648-7386 
648-2758 





SUNSHINE MOVERS 


Lowest Legal Rates Pianos 
24 Hr. 7 Day-Packing Service 
Fully Insured • CALT 140575 

rnnn Call ieremylfo. met ESTIMATE 

vibes 821-9440 


HAULING ON WITH RON 

Reasonable Rates 285-9846 

EB 

One Big Man, One Big Truck 
15/hr. Fred 626-7685 

E45 

Lotus Hauling to the dump. $55 
fee & man. Call 626-3131 E43 

PayLess Express 
Lo rates, 24 hrs. 387-6049 

E43 

Lotus Moving 626-3131 E43 


UPKEEP AND 
RENOVATION 


THE 

PAPERHANGERS 

Wallpapering, Wall Prep, Painting 
References available. 
(415)641-5222 


■LI.«llllfllllHlilliaiillMIIIIIBIIIMillliaillllWlM 

PEACHES PAINTINGS 

LOW COST INTERIOR EXTERIOR PAINTING g 
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP ( 

FREE ESTIMATES a 

Jim/Ken 
863-8306 


Upholstery Connection 



CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY 9t f 
FREE ESTIMATES 
FREE PICKUP dr DELIVERY 

Steve Copeland 

2325 Third St., #206 • S.F. 94107 

863-5596 


AFFORDABLE 

COMPLETE 

HOUSECLEANING 

Residential • Apartments 
Homes • Flats • Offices 
Walls • Windows • Stoves 
HONEST & RELIABLE 

We work Saturday & Sunday 

Arrangements Day or Eve. 

RICHARD'S MEN 
821-3330 

CARPETS STEAMCLEANED 


PAINTING 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR 
Quality Craftsmanship 
Complete Painting Service 
RC RENSTROM 673-1079 


Housecleaning. Exp. Refs. 
Donald, 863-9053 E43 

HOUSECLEAN - 24 HOURS 
ODD JOBS - 7 DAYS/WEEK 

Bonded. A-1 References. 

Bill, 527-1110, by appointment. 
Serves Entire Bay Area 

E48 

Housecleaning. Exp. Refs. 

Call Richard 548-4450 

E43 

APT. - HOUSESITTING 
Mature businessman, plant-pet 
care. Ex refs. No fee. 626-3131 
Ex. 260, Iv. message E43 


ROOFING 

• LIC.340040 

• 20 YEAR TAR AND GRAVEL 

• 30 YEAR SHINGLES 

• ROOF DECKS/GARDENS 

• GOOD PRICE, GUARANTEED WORK 

• FREE ESTIMATES 

PETER 775-1616 24 HRS. 


PLUMBING 
TO YOUR NEEDS 

24 Hour Emergency Service 
• Reliable • 

From a whole house to small jobs. 
Quotations Free 

647-1984 


CUSTOM 

UPHOLSTERY 

We can recover your good, old 
furniture at Zi the cost of new. 
We also custom manufacture 
furniture and accessories. 

Designs Unlimited 

( 415 ) 552-4202 


^-CABINETMAKERS 

D E F Gj eric & 

vl_ > DANIEL 

FURNITURE 431-7180 


Floor Refinishing 

Installation - Repair 

BOBDIRSA 861-3241 #662 



G.B. LIVERY 

BRITISH LIMO RENTALS 

Daimler, Rolls, Bentley 

268-0141 or 929-7997 

(COMPETITIVE PRICES) 

Painting & Drywall 

. Z/nfetic t / Zxleuvi 

■’t/p/ot , 4 ZaM*ina 

■rf/ai/et . J ftefaa J Ma// /Pteft 

626-5332 SPi nC e ^4972 

Landscaping /pruning/sprinklers/ 
rock gardens/fences/7 yrs exp. 
621-5126 John E45 

ROOFING 

Asphalt shngls reroofing and 
repair. Ron, 626-2142. E43 


SERVICES 



PROFESSIONAL 
PIANO TUNING 
SERVICE 
(415)431-4924 


Create an Oriental garden. 
Designs for decks or courts. 
(415) 420-9961 


E43 


PIANO TUNER 

Expert tuning, repairs, evaluations. 
Call Tricks of the Trade. 

864-4981 . E43 



Precision Tuning 
John Walters 


s > 921-2586 


mm mm mm mm net m < - mum i m 




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The above three lines are more 
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Deliver or mail with payment to: Bay Area Reporter, 1528 15th Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 


BAY AREA REPORTER OCTOBER 25, 1984 PAGE 43 

















































































































































































































DANCING NIGHTLY 


MARKET 


THIS WEDNESDAY 


OCT. 31 


7:00 P.M., $4 


NOTE: THIS WEEK'S EPISODE OF DYNASTY, NORMALLY SHOWN WEDNESDAY AT 9 PM, WILL BE 
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